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Blair & Iraq: Why Tony Blair Went to War - An Investigation (Kindle Single)
Blair & Iraq: Why Tony Blair Went to War - An Investigation (Kindle Single)
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Different Take, 28 Jun. 2016
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Steve Richards is unusual among political commentators. He knows what he is talking about because he has been there and done it. He makes his own judgements and is not overswayed by the political agenda of his rather dubious employers. I used to read him assiduously in The Independent before the Russian takeover. He may still have connections with the 'i' but since that was taken over its political stance has been become slightly to the right of Nigel Farage and I wouldn't touch it with the proverbial ten-foot-pole grasped in asbestos gauntlets.

To return to Blair and Iraq. The timing is perfect, given the arrival of the long-awaited Chilcott report in the next few days. I suspect his conclusion is different from the Chilcott view, even after redaction. Richards' argument is that Blair's agenda was not a crazed crusade but the logical consequence of his determination to make Labour electable again. He and his New Labour cronies believed that the public would not back a party that was anti-American and could not countenance armed intervention. Clearly, then, he put both those failings right in Iraq - and made Labour unelectable for a generation.

Perhaps Richards will expand the book in the wake of Chilcott. As it stands, this is the beauty of Kindle Singles - a book exactly as long as it needs to be.


【2016 New Releases】Mpow® 3 in 1 Clip-On 180 Degree Supreme Fisheye + 0.65X Wide Angle+ 10X Macro Lens for iPhone 6s / 6s Plus, iPhone 6 / 6 Plus, iPhone 5 5S 4 4S Samsung HTC
【2016 New Releases】Mpow® 3 in 1 Clip-On 180 Degree Supreme Fisheye + 0.65X Wide Angle+ 10X Macro Lens for iPhone 6s / 6s Plus, iPhone 6 / 6 Plus, iPhone 5 5S 4 4S Samsung HTC
Offered by Patox
Price: £10.99


Plays and Stories: Arthur Schnitzler (German Library)
Plays and Stories: Arthur Schnitzler (German Library)
by Arthur Schnitzler
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Great price - great product!, 9 Jan. 2016
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Hard to find collection at a great price.


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Great service and great price!, 8 Nov. 2015
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Great service and great price! Exactly the product I was looking for.


Operation Mincemeat: The True Spy Story that Changed the Course of World War II
Operation Mincemeat: The True Spy Story that Changed the Course of World War II
Price: £5.69

5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling, with a deep understanding of spycraft, 24 May 2015
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I had seen the author's TV work and knew I was in for a treat. I can't think of another similar book written with such profound understanding of the spying business or learning so lightly and elegantly worn. Superb.


China Blue (The Dudley Sisters Saga Book 3)
China Blue (The Dudley Sisters Saga Book 3)
Price: £1.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I loved the period detail., 16 May 2015
The third book in the Dudley Quartet takes the third sister, Claire, into Occupied France. It's a love story but also has action and suspense. I loved the period detail. I especially liked the involvement of the Canadian airforce. I hadn't really thought about their involvement in WW2, so this was something new for me.


Fire HD 6, 6" HD Display, Wi-Fi, 8 GB (Cobalt) - Includes Special Offers
Fire HD 6, 6" HD Display, Wi-Fi, 8 GB (Cobalt) - Includes Special Offers

5.0 out of 5 stars A step up, 21 Feb. 2015
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A replacement for an earlier model - that's the only reason I bought it. But Kindle Fire has come a long way in the last two years and this is a far better experience.


Don't Point That Thing at Me
Don't Point That Thing at Me
by Kyril Bonfiglioli
Edition: Paperback

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What you get if you mix P G Wodehouse with Derek Raymond, 8 July 2014
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I confess I had never heard of Bonfiglioli, but there has been press lately because Johnny Depp is making a film and Penguin have therefore republished his Mortdecai trilogy, of which this is the first, originally published in the UK in 1972.

Despite the splendiferous name, Bonfigioli was English and his main influence was clearly Wodehouse, with a strong dash of Derek Raymond. Charlie Mortdecai is the second son of a baronet and relies heavily on his manservant. The valet or 'thug' is called Jock Strapp, which gives you a flavour of what follows. Charlie is an art dealer and therefore dodgy. There is a stolen Goya involved in things somewhere, and that gets him to America on a diplomatic passport but results in him being stalked across the mudflats of Morecambe Bay.

The plot is neither here nor there - though I love the final flourish by which Charlie leaves his fate up in the air. What matters is the tone, which is maintained throughout, seemingly without effort. Some of Charlie's observations and one-liners are laugh-out-loud funny. Every para is read with a smile or a grin. The good news is, there are two more volumes to acquire and read. The bad news, it's only two, plus what seems like a prequel and one novel left unfinished when Bonfiglioli died in 1985. It was finished by Craig Brown and I vaguely recall it now. I'm not sure I'll bother with it, though.


The Hanging Shed (Douglas Brodie series Book 1)
The Hanging Shed (Douglas Brodie series Book 1)
Price: £2.29

4.0 out of 5 stars Good start to a new series, 23 Jun. 2014
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It's 1946, Brodie has spent the months since being demobbed in London doing a spot of casual freelance journalism. But he's called to Glasgow by old school pal Hugh Donovan who has got a bit of a problem. He's been found guilty of murdering a little boy and is due to hang in a couple of weeks.

Donovan used to be the best looking lad in his age group. Not now - trapped in a burning cockpit, he's become a monster, hooked on painkillers. Brodie hasn't seen him since they were in late teens. They stopped being best pals when Donovan took Brodie's girlfriend. It's her son Donovan is said to have killed.

The Hanging Shed is more Richard Hannay than Inspector Rebus but it moves along nicely and has moments of interesting reflection. On balance I think the key element of the storyline, the whys and wherefores of the boy's death which I obviously won't reveal here, is too easy. It's in all the papers and it's the first idea every new crime writers reaches for. Which means you kind of expect it from every new crime writer.


Capital
Capital
Price: £0.99

4.0 out of 5 stars State of the nation, 27 Feb. 2014
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This review is from: Capital (Kindle Edition)
John Lanchester has attempted a forensic, fictional analysis of London and therefore Britain, because in the first decade of the 21st century London was the only part of Britain that counted, at the time of the great bank fraud collapse. It's a brave attempt but inevitably some bits work better than others. His Asian and Zimbabwean immigrants are more attractive than the Eastern Europeans. Amazingly his investment banker is the most appealing character of all. I loved the terrorism subplot, the quiet death of Petunia, and hated the conceptual art device. But that's the thing with a state of the nation novel, especially one this long. No one is going to like it all, it cannot maintain quality throughout, and much as I enjoyed it I cannot give it a full five stars.


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