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Mr. J. Horsfall (sheffield, uk)
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Guide to Beekeeping (BBKA Guides)
Guide to Beekeeping (BBKA Guides)
by Ivor Davis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.89

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very good first book, 19 Jan 2013
Having read a few starter bee books and looked at a few more, this is amongst the better. It is up to date (ie has lots of info on bee disease), and is well produced (lots of nice photos). There are a few typo's that need correcting before the second edition, but these are few. It covers all the areas you'll need to know about in your first year or two of beekeeping.

It is a very good book for a starter beekeeper, but should be supplemented with a course and reading some of the FERA information on bee diseases.


Collins Fungi Guide: The most complete field guide to the mushrooms and toadstools of Britain & Ireland: The Most Complete Field Guide to the ... of Britain and Europe (Collins Guide)
Collins Fungi Guide: The most complete field guide to the mushrooms and toadstools of Britain & Ireland: The Most Complete Field Guide to the ... of Britain and Europe (Collins Guide)
by Stefan Buczacki
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 21.70

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not good enough, 17 Nov 2012
As many of the other reviewers have said, this book is a disapointment. The descriptions are too brief, the pictures are too small, the colours of the fungi are sometimes misleading. So as an ID guide it fails in many ways. I understand the need to save space to be able to fit so many species into a single book, but it is not small so why not be a larger book to be a reference at home that is useful? Instead it is rucsack sized book (not pocket) and not as useful as some older less comprehensive books.

I'd recommend not to buy this, but have a look at the other books that are available.


Pandora's Seed: Why the Hunter-Gatherer Holds the Key to Our Survival (Penguin Press Science)
Pandora's Seed: Why the Hunter-Gatherer Holds the Key to Our Survival (Penguin Press Science)
by Spencer Wells
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A bit disapointing, 26 July 2012
I haven't read any of Spencer Wells other books, but I was expecting more from an academic. The parts of the book that were on his specialty were good and well written (the bits on evolutionary genetics, and the palaeontology of Homo species), but the other bits were boring and uninspiring. The part about climate change seemed like someone writing about something he'd only just read about himself (no real insight, or anything to add to the debate).

The lack of consistency really lets it down, as some bits are good. But it didn't leave mean wanting to learn more or read anything of Spencer Wells'.


How To Stay Sane: The School of Life
How To Stay Sane: The School of Life
by Philippa Perry
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy read and useful, 26 July 2012
I'm not one for reading 'self help books', but I bought this for my other half and read it when she was finished. It's only short, and I read it in a day. But that's because it's very readable and interesting. There are some good exercises to try in back too (I haven't done them all yet) to help you stay sane (become more self aware etc). It is well thought out and clearly explains how to get into good mental habits and why you should.

I'd definitely recommend this book to anyone who is having a down period (it's not really aimed at those with serious depression etc) or who has been in the past or has a family member who can have blue periods.


The King of Limbs
The King of Limbs
Price: 8.70

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best Radiohead, 30 Oct 2011
This review is from: The King of Limbs (Audio CD)
It's ok, there are some good songs, but also some dross. Given it is a fairly short album, it can't really support the less good songs. Unless you are a Radiohead fanatic you may want to go to some of the older albums first (I particularly like OK Computer and Kid A).


Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cookery
Madhur Jaffrey's Indian Cookery
by Madhur Jaffrey
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ok, not excellent, 30 Oct 2011
This is a nice simple book about Indian food. The recipes are easy to follow and produce quite nice results. It is a little dated though, especially the fact that it seems to revolve around meat based dishes. There are vegetarian dishes, but they are all in the side dishes section, and probably wouldn't be able to hold up as a main course. Given the large number of vegetarian dishes in India, it could have cover this a bit more. Other than that the book doesn't suffer too much for being over 20 years old (since first printed); the lack of photos (in the imprint I have) does also belie it's age, but is not a problem.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 16, 2013 8:37 AM GMT


The One-Straw Revolution (New York Review Books Classics)
The One-Straw Revolution (New York Review Books Classics)
by Masanobu Fukuoka
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Inspirational book, 11 Sep 2011
This book is not really a 'how to' book, especially for me living in the UK. It is based on a Japanese form of subsistence farming not available to those of different climates and cultures (would an Englishman really want rice to be his main crop?). However, the content of the book is not really designed to make you want to emulate the author exactly, but to consider how you already grow and gather food, and to ask can I NOT do something to make growing the food easier. A very thought provoking idea, not one I intend to take up staright away, but it is definitely something to keep in mind, and possibly aspire to in the future. (This may not make it sound like is an essential read, which it isn't for a relative novice gardener like me).

So consider this book somewhere between a philosophy book, and a regular vegetable gardening book. I would definitely recommend it to any vegetable gardener/allotmenteer, particularly if you are, or try to be, organic.


God Willin' & The Creek Don't Rise
God Willin' & The Creek Don't Rise
Price: 5.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not back to his 'Trouble' days as some reviews had said, 31 Jan 2011
I got this album after reading some of the reviews on amazon saying he was back to his 'Trouble' days - in sound and quality. However it's not really. It is in the vain of his heavily produced and electrified other albums. So if you enjoyed those you will like this. However, I'm not a fan of the overly embellished and electrified guitar sounds, hence the 2 stars.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 22, 2011 1:09 PM GMT


A View of the World: Selected Journalism
A View of the World: Selected Journalism
by Norman Lewis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.39

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent travel writing, 25 Jan 2011
I throughly enjoyed reading this book, the essays cover a number of countries, mainly Latin American and Southern European. The writing really brings into sharp relief the different cultures and ways of doing things around the world. Sometimes these are interesting other times shocking. The essay on the genocide in Brazil was obviously one of the shocking ones, but really draws attention to the treatment of tribal people. Although it is decades since this particular essay it does have resonance with current events and helps to explain the reason why Survival International was set up (it was inspired by Lewis amongst others).

The essays on Ibiza and Naples are more cosy and easy to read, but still compelling.

I didn't know what to expect (not having read anything about the book before I got it), but was a little surprised it was mostly travel writing rather than about indiginous culture. But it was nonetheworse for it. Just know before you buy it not to expect it to all be about tribes, it is often about his experience as a traveler, or local peoples in more developed countries.


Panasonic Lumix TZ8 Digital Camera - Black (12.1MP, 12x Optical Zoom) 2.7 inch LCD
Panasonic Lumix TZ8 Digital Camera - Black (12.1MP, 12x Optical Zoom) 2.7 inch LCD

5.0 out of 5 stars Great functionality, 16 Jan 2011
This is a fairly high spec camera (although not the top of the range - this is the TZ10). At the time of writing (Jan 2011) I think the TZ8 offers good value for the amount of features it has.

To be honest I doubt I'll use the movie function much (I haven't so far), although it is easy to use and seems to give good results. It's the ability to take photos that is the real draw of a camera like this. It has a number of settings as you might expect from a high end camera, and some of these are better suited to those who know about manual use of SLR cameras, but the variety of built in settings cover almost every setting so you don't need to know how to use the manual settings if you don't want.

The zoom is great, the optical zoom goes to x12 (or roughly equivalent to a 300mm zoom on a 35mm camera), the digital zoom doubles this but there is loss of sharpness etc. The anti-shake is fairly good too - but there are limits to everything, so it won't compensate for terrible shake but I doubt anything ever will.

All in all a very good camera, with few if any faults.


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