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ECO310.B - Delonghi Icona Pump Espresso/Cappuccino Maker ECO310B. As shown
ECO310.B - Delonghi Icona Pump Espresso/Cappuccino Maker ECO310B. As shown

76 of 82 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Nice espresso machine for the price, 15 Nov. 2009
Nice product, well built and nicely presented. Looks lively in our kitchen!

The Icona is a good, middle-of-road espresso machine which warms up quickly, has a big reservoir and good steam capacity too for frothing milk. The filters in the group set (the bit that holds the coffee) are delognhi's cream-enhancing design; that means espresso with a good crema. They can be dismantled for cleaning every couple of weeks or so.

It whistled and squeaked a bit for the first week, but seems to have settled down nicely now.

Used it with everything from shop-ground coffee to pods and not been disappointed.


Newton's Wake: Novel
Newton's Wake: Novel
by Ken MacLeod
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Flimsy, 24 Mar. 2007
This review is from: Newton's Wake: Novel (Paperback)
I brought this after being pleasantly surprised by 'Learning the World' from the same author. I wish I'd read these reviews first! MacLeod introduces and occasionally even develops some nice ideas and concepts, but never really follows through. In some respect it's rather reminiscent of Charles Stross's works, being built around the ideas and aftermath of a singularity, and is just as incomprehensible. The use of pseudo-glaswegian dialect doesn't really help, either - it's easily read, but pointless complication. After a promising start, it seems as though the author has suddenly realised he's going to go over his page limit, and from then on, everything feels rushed and compressed, or at very least lost and looking for the punchline.


Learning The World: A novel of first contact
Learning The World: A novel of first contact
by Ken MacLeod
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid if not too imaginative, 24 Mar. 2007
A rather engaging novel, if not too visionary, this is a interesting exploration of the tensions and troubles brought on by impending first contact. Read it as Sci-fi and you'll be disappointed; it has none of the epic quality of Alastair Reynolds's books, and little of the (black) humour or toys of Iain M. Banks. Read it as any old paperback and it's a good study of the troubles of living together in a multi-cultural world, transposed onto an unexpectedly occupied solar system.


Below the Convergence: Voyages Toward Antarctica 1699-1839
Below the Convergence: Voyages Toward Antarctica 1699-1839
by Alan Gurney
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Amazing voyages,, 3 Sept. 2006
An interesting attempt to describe Antarctic expeditions and travel from 1700 to 1840, this book quickly becomes very irritating. Chronologies are confused, stories are interrupted with other narratives and the whole thing seems not to have been proof-read or spell checked. The only saving grace are the maps, without which the book would be absolutely incomprehensible. Worth it in the sense that very few other books cover this part of exploration history, it's not a book for the faint hearted or those without some background knowledge.


Mawson's Will: The Greatest Polar Survival Story Ever Written
Mawson's Will: The Greatest Polar Survival Story Ever Written
by Lennard Bickel
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.32

19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not a bibiliography or expedition description, 25 Mar. 2006
If you were expecting or looking for a description of the 1913 Australian Antarctic Expedition, you won't find find it in this book. Nor is it a biography of Mawson. There's little personal background, not a single map, very little in the way of references or information. I'm still not even sure if the degrees of temperature that are described are Fahrenheit or Centigrade; call me pedantic, but it makes a difference! It's nowhere near the quality of Roland Huntford's 'Shackleton', for example, which was the inspiration for wanting to know more about Mawson.
Once I'd realised that it wasn't the book I was hoping for, I found it an interesting attempt to look into Mawson's head, and at what goes on psychologically during a long expedition, and the effects of physical collapse on an exhausted person. But it's still a little too much conjecture and assumption for my liking. Mawson's own 'Home of the Blizzard' might give a more detailed picture of what happened.


The Physics of Blown Sand and Desert (Dover Earth Science)
The Physics of Blown Sand and Desert (Dover Earth Science)
by R A Bagnold
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The classic work on blowing sand, 23 Dec. 2005
First printed in 1941, slightly edited in 1953 and based on research going back many years before then, this is a definitive and classic work. Look at any journal today in the fields of sedimentology, glaciology or almost any branch of geophysics, and in that journal there will be a reference to this. The reason it survives as _the_ reference work is evident on reading the book; very few science texts are so accessable or readable. Bagnold's analysis is clear and well thought out, and it is a testament to the foundation that he laid that his work is still being built on, not discredited or ignored.
Bagnold addresses the hows and whys of drifting sand, looks at snow in passing and turns to desert dunes before stopping to consider 'singing sands'. The background to his work is also well worth reading, and can be found in 'Sand, wind and war; memoirs of a desert explorer', which also deserves to be reprinted.
An essential reference work for geophysicists dealing with sediment transport, but also a good read for those interested in the application of science to understanding the world around them.


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