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J. Leech (Staffs, United Kingdom)

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What is Life? (Canto Classics)
What is Life? (Canto Classics)
Price: 5.19

5.0 out of 5 stars An eminent scientist examines consciousness, 19 Jan 2014
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One section of this book shows a brilliant scientist exploring the mystery of the senses and of consciousness. No amount of scientific data and theorising can explain the phenomenal experience of seeing the colour yellow or hearing the sound of a cello. Schroedinger draws our attention to the gap between the physical and the conscious.


The Calligrapher's Garden
The Calligrapher's Garden
by Hassan Massoudy
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.40

5.0 out of 5 stars Excelent, 21 May 2013
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very beautiful calligraphy/art and very inexpensive in view of all the colour work
I very strongly recommend this book to lovers of calligraphy


The Art of Colour Calligraphy
The Art of Colour Calligraphy
by Mary Noble
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars excellent, 4 Mar 2013
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This is the perfect book for a calligrapher who wants to develop the use of colour in calligraphy.
Highly recommended.


Reality: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
Reality: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
by Jan Westerhoff
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reality, A Very Short Introduction, 4 July 2012
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This is an excellent introduction to some very difficult philosophical concepts but written with a light touch to make them accessible to the general reader who is willing to stick at it and do some thinking.


Understanding Phenomenology (Understanding Movements in Modern Thought)
Understanding Phenomenology (Understanding Movements in Modern Thought)
by David R. Cerbone
Edition: Paperback
Price: 16.99

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomenology made clear, 3 Jan 2010
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This is an excellent introduction to a difficult subject but David Cerbone does a briliant job of making it as clear as is possible.
I think you need some background in philosophy to begin with but, granted that, you could not have a better way in. The book's introduction sets out the main topics. Then, chapter by chapter, Cerbone takes you through the key ideas of the main thinkers in this area: Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre and Merleau-Ponty. There is also a chapter explaining some objections to phenomenology and a discussion of how effective they are. Overall a first-rate book. If you were ever afraid of being overwhelmed by jargon and gobbledegook if you started to read about phenomenology, this is the book for you. I have learned a lot from it.


Elizabeth's Women: The Hidden Story of the Virgin Queen
Elizabeth's Women: The Hidden Story of the Virgin Queen
by Tracy Borman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 16.32

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 'Elizabeth's Women' by Tracy Borman 450pp hardback, 26 Oct 2009
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This was very detailed and written in an accessible style. It was interesting to learn about the interlinking of the families and the consequent threats to Elizabeth's position from so many (female) contenders in the royal line. This is why it would have been SO USEFUL to have had some family trees at the beginning of the book.The illustrations were good, containing some (to me) new material - for example the locket ring owned by Elizabeth I and the 'recently discovered portrait of Henry VI and his children'. There is some repetition both of information and interpretation. Some proof reading might have avoided the misquotation on page 333 'I know I have the body of a weak and female (sic) woman' ('feeble'). The final two chapters seem to be composed of a catalogue of the young women who flouted Elizabeth and the increasing tetchiness with which she dealt with them: I think it would have given more human interest if, perhaps, we could have had more detail about the minutiae of everyday life and some indication of other political stresses on her. There are, of course, many comments prefaced by 'if' and 'perhaps' but the text is backed by quotations from contemporary documents and contains a section of reference notes and an index.I recommend it as a new slant on a well known historical figure and the period.


Unknown Soldiers
Unknown Soldiers
by Mark Leech
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Unknown Soldiers' suitability for discussion groups, 5 Jan 2003
This review is from: Unknown Soldiers (Paperback)
It is refreshing to read a novel which doesn't feel it has to begin like a film with attention-seeking action. Instead the writer exploits the strengths of the medium with evocative subtlety. As in several very recent novels (for example such widely differing works as 'Hotel World' by Ali Smith and 'My Name is Red' by Orhan Pamuk) the views of the dead are expressed alongside the living. This is not overdone in 'Unknown Soldiers' but is integral to the structure. There is an interweaving of convincing, realistic detail and 'magic realism', aptly mirroring the attempts in the aftermath of war to reclaim normal life and relationships from years of upheaval and nightmare. We are presented with two diametrically opposed approaches to the same events: the clash between the bureaucracy of officialdom and the subjective pain of the individual. What fascinated me was the enigma of Celine - is her obstinate fidelity to a cause motivated by love or duty? Is she, in the modern phrase, 'seeking closure'? - a compelling necessity in the opening years of this century just as much as in the last. Finally, there is the image of the ghosts of the past still talking to us. One of the most evocative descriptions is of the twists of paper fluttering across the mud of old battlefields - reminding us of the voices which cannot be silenced completely. Reading groups could well find this novel a rewarding subject for discussion.


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