Shop now Shop now Shop now Up to 70% off Fashion Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Amazon Fire TV Amazon Pantry Food & Drink Beauty Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Listen in Prime Shop now Shop now
Profile for Rosen > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Rosen
Top Reviewer Ranking: 304,593
Helpful Votes: 25

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Rosen (Wales)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2
pixel
A Year in Provence
A Year in Provence
by Peter Mayle
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

5.0 out of 5 stars One of those treasures that's so good you don't want to finish it, 15 Jan. 2016
This review is from: A Year in Provence (Paperback)
One of those treasures that's so good you don't want to finish it. An English couple emigrates to Provence and experiences the pleasures and oddities of rural French life. Okay, it's a bit dated now, but so what? It's well written, witty, often understated, and hugely enjoyable from start to finish.


As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning (Penguin Modern Classics)
As I Walked Out One Midsummer Morning (Penguin Modern Classics)
by Laurie Lee
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Gorgeous writing, 10 Sept. 2015
The autobiographical prewar wandering of a teenager through England and (mainly) Spain provides but the bare skeleton of a book that is fleshed out with Lee's vivid and evocative prose. I luxuriated in every page.


The Swedish Girl (William Lorimer)
The Swedish Girl (William Lorimer)
by Alex Gray
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Dreadful, 28 Aug. 2015
It's quite an achievement to make a police procedural with several murders proceed at such a snail's pace, but the author does it. This torpid progress is the result of padding: flashbacks, much of it irrelevant, detail, also irrelevant, repetition, including inner thoughts, many times over. Although there's a lot of detail of Glasgow's geography, how the flat lay in relation to the neighbour, which is crucial, remained a mystery to me. Three new characters are introduced close to the end, and the forensic psychiatry is laughable. The Prologue is nicely written, and I thought I was in for a good read, but sadly it goes downhill immediately. The dialogue staggers along through the overuse of tags and adverbs (of the type 'she responded tartly'), names are overused instead of pronouns when there's just a man and a woman involved. These faults, and telling as well as showing, would have been pointed up in any book or class on creative writing. The Swedish-English dialogue is very unconvincing. I guessed the main perp a short way in and only went to the end to confirm it. A dismal reading experience.


The Ice Queen
The Ice Queen
by Nele Neuhaus
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dreadful writing, 17 July 2015
This review is from: The Ice Queen (Paperback)
Read about a third because I couldn't stand the dreadful writing any more. Every line and phrase of dialogue has a tag, and often an adverb too - 'Bodenstein said', 'Pia opined thoughtfully', that sort of thing. Info dumps galore. Point-of-view switches from head to head. Far too many characters - new ones introduced with each of the initial chapters. And deliberate teasing of the kind 'Now he had the chance to do it again' - yeah, like what? Do you want me to believe this is the killer? Along with all the others you've done the same thing for? Could have been an interesting plot, but there are far more talented writers out there.


Time to Die (DCI Hanlon)
Time to Die (DCI Hanlon)
by Alex Howard
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but poorly written, 9 May 2015
Quite an interesting plot, and good knowledge of police divisions and procedures, but dreadful writing. Padded out with irrelevant background, displaying too obviously the author's knowledge of London - and his prejudices on every subject. This background is often interposed at length between lines of dialogue, which really slows it up. The point of view swaps all the time. It's littered with unnecessary tags (he said, she said, etc.). Showing AND telling (e.g. 'he turned, frowning. He looked puzzled.') And every point seems to be made at least three times over. As for the plot, would separate crimes in a city the size of London be associated this easily?


Jeeves and the Wedding Bells
Jeeves and the Wedding Bells
by Sebastian Faulks
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars What an absolute hoot!, 11 Sept. 2014
Things have been a bit rum of late so I don’t mind saying that this was just the ticket to raise the old spirits. Us fans have missed the Wodehousian – is that the word I’m looking for? – humour since the old boy popped his clogs, but here at last we have another generous helping of Wooster, B. and his usual lunatic japes. I had the audiobook loaded in the old two-seater, and the narrator was absolutely top-hole, with as many voices as that Rory something-or-other, for both chaps and the fairer sex. As well as the not-so-fair, like Dame Judith. So carpe diem and all that, get stuck in, and if your man wonders what the devil you’re chuckling at – well, I’m sure you’ll think of something.


The Oxford Dictionary Of Slang (Oxford Paperback Reference) (Oxford Quick Reference)
The Oxford Dictionary Of Slang (Oxford Paperback Reference) (Oxford Quick Reference)
by John Ayto
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

4.0 out of 5 stars For this purpose it's excellent. But who was the idiot who placed the ..., 11 Sept. 2014
I use this book mainly to look at synonyms – for example, American or Australian words equivalent to a bit of English slang. For this purpose it's excellent. But who was the idiot who placed the page numbers on the INSIDE margin of the pages? It makes the book very much harder to use, and for that reason I've docked it a star. Incidentally the Oxford Dictionary of Idioms suffers from the same fault, so it's clearly a conscious design decision, not the work of a bird-brained printer.


Silent Witnesses
Silent Witnesses
by Nigel McCrery
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

5.0 out of 5 stars It clearly represents the outcome of a good deal of research, 3 July 2014
This review is from: Silent Witnesses (Paperback)
This book presents a history of forensic science, made highly readable through a succession of (mainly) murder cases. It clearly represents the outcome of a good deal of research. The case history format is an excellent vehicle for conveying the science. The final chapter, on the use of DNA for identification in cases that included the Romanovs, Anastasia, and Richard III was particularly fascinating. There are a number of illustrations, and a good index.


Mystic River
Mystic River
by Dennis Lehane
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A yawn, 17 Jan. 2014
This review is from: Mystic River (Paperback)
This is a good example of a wafer-thin plot stretched and padded out to three times the proper length. The detailed description of feelings of bereavement are prolonged and repetitive. A character walks into a girl's bedroom and sees a photograph of the girl with her father; that's not enough, we need a description of when it took place, what the occasion was, and a long discourse on what the father's smile means. Moments that should have had excitement and pace are dragged down by yet more internal dialogue. Even after the 'mystery' is solved it goes on and on, and then, unbelievably, there's a long epilogue, containing another history of the development of the entire town, which -if it was in there at all -should have come much earlier. I formerly admired this writer, but after this I won't be reading any more of his work.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 13, 2015 10:30 AM BST


Breast Beating: A Personal Odyssey in the Quest for an Understanding of Breast Cancer, the Meaning of Life and Other Easy Questions
Breast Beating: A Personal Odyssey in the Quest for an Understanding of Breast Cancer, the Meaning of Life and Other Easy Questions
by Nick Ross
Edition: Paperback
Price: £30.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Lives up to its title, 27 Oct. 2011
Several voices are heard in this book. There is Mike Baum the person, self-revealing, witty or acerbic, buoyant or dejected. There is Professor Baum, surgeon and academic, seeker after medical truths. And there is Michael Baum, artist and art-lover, philosopher, and humanitarian. With these guides the reader is taken on a journey through the complexities of breast cancer and the controversies and rivalries that surround its treatment. An entertaining and informative read by someone who has contributed so much to the field.


Page: 1 | 2