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Antony Bartlett (the Unitied Kingdom)
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Coaching for Performance: GROWing Human Potential and Purpose: The Principles and Practice of Coaching and Leadership (People Skills for Professionals)
Coaching for Performance: GROWing Human Potential and Purpose: The Principles and Practice of Coaching and Leadership (People Skills for Professionals)

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Covers the basics very well before heading off on a flight of fancy, 12 Nov. 2013
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I read this book because I am drawn to the GROW model, and the author does give a good exposition of it, but it was the distinction made between end-goals and performance goals that I found most powerful and useful. I enjoyed reading about the history of coaching, how it emerged from more technique-based sports-coaching via Timothy Gallwey and his “The Inner Game of...” books. I also love the idea of the coach raising awareness and responsibility and helping with the transformation from hierarchy to self-responsibility.

However, I could definitely do without all this talk of a “transpersonal” dimension to things. Suggesting this is where meaning is to be found is in my view an unwelcome privileging of the “transpersonal” over other more tangible aspects of being. And to suggest that some approaches (e.g. humanistic and transpersonal) are better than others (e.g. cognitive and behavioural) flies in the face of all the empirical research pointing to outcomes which are statistically inseparable... or if it is intended normatively, then I'm not convinced the reasoning isn't circular.

So yes, I got a lot out of this book, but my overall experience was sullied.


Rich Dad Poor Dad
Rich Dad Poor Dad
Price: £5.18

4.0 out of 5 stars A charming parable, simple and extremely readable, 26 Sept. 2013
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This review is from: Rich Dad Poor Dad (Kindle Edition)
Let's not get too carried away here - not many people are ever going to be capable of the kind of real-estate genius Kiyosaki describes himself making a killing with - otherwise the growth-margins achievable would quickly fall back towards the long term average. Nate Silver says "After adjusting for inflation, a $10,000 investment made in a home in 1896 would be worth just $10,600 in 1996. The rate of return had been less in a century than the stock market typically produces in a single year" - if you want a view of risk which is both bullish and healthy I thoroughly recommend his book - The Signal and the Noise - instead.

Apart from this small amount of hot-air, what we have here is an absolutely charming parable, simple and extremely readable, with lots of intresting, sensible and down to earth advice, which stresses the importance of the right kind of learning and thus paints itself as the begining of a journey rather than a complete system. Well worth reading.


The Signal and the Noise: The Art and Science of Prediction
The Signal and the Noise: The Art and Science of Prediction
Price: £6.64

4.0 out of 5 stars Definitely worth a read, 26 Sept. 2013
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A good read and very well written, each chapter has a interesting story to tell about something (e.g. baseball, the weather, earthquakes, poker) and it's made me re-assess my attitude to risk. At the start it sounded like it might have something profound and world-view-altering to say, but for me it was merely very good. The footnotes are annoying on the Kindle version having to jump around, most are just citations but there's some gems in there too so I couldn't not allow the flow of my reading to be disrupted in this way. The citations make the book look slightly better researched than it is: as it happens the last book I read was The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, and Silver has clearly misunderstood Kuhn's perspective. Bayes theory is very important, but confidence intervals certainly still have their place too - meta-analysis eventually sorts out the problem of published results not being replicable. I would have like to have started crunching some numbers myself, but obviously it's not that sort of technical books. Still a very worthwhile read.


Panasonic KX-TG6461ET DECT Corded and Cordless Phone Set With Answer Machine - Black
Panasonic KX-TG6461ET DECT Corded and Cordless Phone Set With Answer Machine - Black
Offered by liGo
Price: £64.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Call barring, 11 Sept. 2013
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Advertised as having call barring, but this feature is in effect useless because there is no way to bar all calls for which the number is withheld. (Number-withheld callers must be the most common type of call one might wish to bar, and barred callers could still disturb you by witholding their number, so what's the point?!)
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 12, 2013 10:21 AM GMT


Keysonic ACK-540U+ Black Mini Keyboard with Integrated Smart Touchpad UK Layout
Keysonic ACK-540U+ Black Mini Keyboard with Integrated Smart Touchpad UK Layout
Price: £24.96

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars hmm, 13 May 2012
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Lasted a year and a half before the left-shift key started performing a left-arrow operation in addition to its usual function. But hey, it's done the job nicely until now, and I like it enough to be ordering another one as a replacement.


What You Can Change and What You Can't: Learning to Accept What You Are: The Complete Guide to Successful Self-Improvement
What You Can Change and What You Can't: Learning to Accept What You Are: The Complete Guide to Successful Self-Improvement
by Martin E. P. Seligman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.08

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book. I feel I understand the human condition better for having read it., 18 Aug. 2010
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I found this to be an excellent book. I feel I understand the human condition better for having read it. Many of the chapters focus on a single difficultly, e.g. Anxiety, Phobias, Depression, Anger, Weight, Alcohol. Seligman describes what is known about each, and considers the outcomes of various treatments based on scientific studies which he references (without this intruding on the main text's readability). He is honest about it when he goes beyond the evidence and ventures his own opinion. As an example of the kind of question he considers: In treating alcoholism, should the goal be total abstinence, or controlled moderate drinking?

It's best to point out this is not a book about Positive Psychology, as that is what Seligman is probably best known for. And yet probably very relevant to Positive Psychology all the same - not much point in studying human strengths without some sort of primer on human weaknesses.

I found the book very readable, comprehensive and enjoyable (for some reason I struggled with "Authentic Happiness" by the same author).

Just in the chapter on dieting I would have liked more detail, or suggestions for further reading at the popular science level of this book (as I've already said, there are plenty unobtrusive references to original research). It's still a great chapter though, and in my view this stuff about dieting can't be repeated enough in our weight-obsessed culture:

- You can lose weight in a month or two on almost any diet.
- Most people gain almost all their weight back in four to five years, with perhaps 10 percent remaining thin (there are about a dozen well-executed long-term studies involving thousands of dieters, and all of them show basically the same dismal result).


50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions About Human Behavior (Great Myths of Psychology)
50 Great Myths of Popular Psychology: Shattering Widespread Misconceptions About Human Behavior (Great Myths of Psychology)
by Scott O. Lilienfeld
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.49

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exactly what the title says!, 28 July 2010
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An informative and enjoyable read - somehow those pages just kept on turning. Well argued and well referenced (unobtrusively). Now I'm noticing these myths as they crop up in everyday life.


No Title Available

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Colours, 30 Mar. 2010
Be warned that colours may vary wildly from those shown in the images (which I understand are for "guidance only"). I really did think I'd been sent black rather than the French Navy I ordered, by mistake.


Big Book of IQ Tests: How Smart are You?
Big Book of IQ Tests: How Smart are You?
by SULLIVAN
Edition: Spiral-bound

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Does not contain IQ tests, 16 Aug. 2009
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May be an excellent puzzle book, but the term IQ test has a very specific meaning in Psychology. These tests have not been normalised by giving them to a large number of people. No attempt has been made minimise the amount of cultural knowledge that is advantagous in taking the test - rather the author seems proud of the fact the book includes crosswords and crypto-grams. And the table for mapping test scores to suggested IQ scores starts at 100. 100 is supposed to be the average IQ. This book should not have been published under such a mis-leading title.


Isle of the Dead
Isle of the Dead
by Roger Zelazny
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully written and self contained., 23 Jun. 2001
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This review is from: Isle of the Dead (Paperback)
This is my favourite Science fiction story - there's a lot of other good stuff, by the way, in Zelazny's Amber series - but I've never come across a story of novel length by any author that is quite as self contained, flows as well, but still has something new and captivating on every page, as Isle of the Dead. It is often said of Zelazny that he writes (wrote) of technology as if it is magic, and magic as if it is technology, and both are to be found here in abundance and harmony, along with two very complex but believable alien races. But despite these lofty themes, it is still very much a human story, it's the narrator - Francis Sandow's way of giving us his unique perspective (insight?) of life and the human condition.


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