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Latif Jones (UK)

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Oxford Sentinel U Lock Large
Oxford Sentinel U Lock Large
Offered by bikes4life limited
Price: 21.76

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Useless, 9 Jan 2014
This review is from: Oxford Sentinel U Lock Large
Purchased this from a bike shop of questionable ethical standards; within a month it required a range of cunning strategies to get the key to turn (banging, shaking); within two months, it lay spavined on my kitchen table, spent and useless, a wretched husk, a waste of metal. Avoid.


Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism
Islam and the Moral Economy: The Challenge of Capitalism
by Charles Tripp
Edition: Paperback
Price: 21.21

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book that sets the standard for future scholarship, 16 Mar 2008
This is one of the very few books chronicling the Muslim world's take on modern capitalism, and it is by far the best. The various responses to economic modernity from the Muslim world are meticulously documented and studiously referenced, and laid to paper with effortless skill and clarity. The book demonstrates a remarkable amount of scholarly work from an expert in the field.

The first three chapters examine the social problems in advanced industrial societies and Islamic intellectuals' responses to these issues, including to the questions of money, social solidarity, property and Islamic socialism. The latter two chapters chart the development of 'Islamic economics', Islamic banks, and Islamic anti-capitalist critiques. The entire book is exceedingly well-referenced and unusually incisive for a scholarly work of this scale.

The blurb carries a quote from James Piscatori calling the book "a finely observed and trenchant study", and notes that: "There could be no surer or more informed guide than this to the scholarly and public debates over the centrality of development, social need, and justice to the evolving 'common sense' of Muslim societies". Piscatori is absolutely correct - it is rare to find a work, on any topic, as informative as this.

'Islam and the Moral Economy' will be the first port of call to those interested in the responses of Islam (or religion in general) to modern capitalism, as well as those looking for good studies of 'Eastern' responses to capitalism. Tripp treats those he cites with the respect and detailed analysis often missing from Western scholarship; as a result, one learns a great deal about little-known, but important, Arab and Asian intellectual thought. A plethora of social issues and questions are raised and discussed, making this far more than a book purely about economics or religion.

This book is highly recommended, and clearly sets the standard that future work on the topic must strive to meet.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 17, 2012 2:24 PM BST


A Child from the Village (Middle East Literature in Translation)
A Child from the Village (Middle East Literature in Translation)
by Sayyid Qutb
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 19.14

5.0 out of 5 stars A long-overdue edition, 16 Mar 2008
This is an excellent edition of Qutb's autobiographical work, which charts the slide to modernity in twentieth century rural Egypt. It will be of interest to anyone interested in Egyptian modern literature or Qutb's early writing. The translator's introduction is explanatory and well worth a read. It's worth noting that this hardcover edition demonstrates very high quality binding and paper.


The Intellectual: The Positive Power of Negative Thinking...
The Intellectual: The Positive Power of Negative Thinking...
by Steve Fuller
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not recommended, 8 Mar 2008
Luckily, I didn't buy this book - I read it in my university library. It's not at all what I expected from the title and description (although later, having heard Steve Fuller debating, I was not surprised).

Fuller discusses 'truth', 'power', 'thinking', etc. but makes no attempt at all to define these terms - let alone to engage with the varied and interesting debate surrounding these ideas. He does not bother to generate any arguments, expand the boundaries of knowledge, engage with real debates and ideas, or even present existing theories in an interesting way. His 'arguments' are loose, winding, and often either ridiculous or exceedingly obvious. Where you can find a train of thought, which is rare, it is a subject that has inevitably been discussed at length, and with far greater eloquence, elsewhere. As a result, much of the book is tedious, outlandish, and at worst, nonsensical. I find it difficult to understand why anyone enjoyed this book. I can only imagine that they were swayed by the self-satisfaction and smugness that Fuller attempts to extend to his readers.

This is not a serious book, and I do not recommend it at all. Anyone with a very basic knowledge of philosophy will recognise it to be completely nonsensical. And beginners would do far better elsewhere.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 12, 2008 11:23 PM BST


From Time Immemorial: The Origins of the Arab-Jewish Conflict Over Palestine
From Time Immemorial: The Origins of the Arab-Jewish Conflict Over Palestine
by Joan Peters
Edition: Paperback
Price: 11.15

47 of 66 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Exposed and worthless, 6 Mar 2008
'From Time Immemorial' is not about putting forward "one side" of the argument, or being 'biased'. That would entail having the facts, and spinning them a certain way. This book, as other reviewers have detailed at length, entirely invents facts and consists of an elaborate hoax. All respected historians have panned the book. It received a terribly poor reaction in Israel itself.

It's unfortunate that people feel they must 'support' this book because it furthers 'their' cause. All reasonable people seek peace in the region, and a fradulent thesis that wipes out an entire people will do nothing towards that end. Reading this book is an insult to many years of serious scholarship and writing on the issues of the region, by people of all nationalities (including many Israelis and Palestinians).

This book is only useful as a study in ficticious fraud; but if you plan to conduct such a study, I strongly suggest a visit to the library instead.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 4, 2013 7:01 PM BST


Sony MDR-ED21LP Groove Shaped Earpiece headphones
Sony MDR-ED21LP Groove Shaped Earpiece headphones

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best 'phones out, 11 July 2006
Having tried pretty much all the earphones on the market, I can safely say that these are the best overall by far.

The fit is comfortable, especially when you've been using them for a few days, and they literally never fall out of your ears. The sound is excellent, with bass and high-frequency levels both very well represented (which is unusual for earphones). They're sturdy and sustain continual use without breaking. Lastly, the price is excellent for the quality, and means you're not blowing a huge amount of money on earphones that can easily be lost or broken.

I've been using these earphones for about five years (though the modern design is slightly changed). I've had to replace my earphones twice and each time, after trying everything else out there, I've come back to these. Reliable, superior and inexpensive.

A minor caveat - if you're used to sharing earphones, these aren't the ones to buy as they mould themselves to your ear shape. Plus, they go pretty deep, and you'd probably want to avoid ear infection.


An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory
An Introduction to Literature, Criticism and Theory
by Dr Andrew Bennett
Edition: Paperback

17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb, 5 Dec 2005
This book offers a real insight into the vast world of literary criticism and theory: it delves into fundamental subject areas, asking questions like, 'What is the text? Where does it begin?' Bennett & Royle consistently keep our interest (no mean feat in a book of this scope) and write concisely, intelligently and fluently. Case studies are used, so the theory really comes into play. I would recommend this book to anyone starting a course on literature or merely with an interest in the texts that make up our world. Particularly useful are the 'Further Reading' footnotes at the end of each chapter, which will advise you on texts to read according to what you found interesting about the subject. This is a relatively short book, but covers all its subject matter well and references other works which can provide a deeper insight. Don't expect to use this as a complete reference book; you will need to do some more reading, but as a comprehensive summary of modern literary theory this book is perfect.


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