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Gerard Mermoz "Gérard Mermoz" (UK)
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Artists on Art: From 14th to 20th Century
Artists on Art: From 14th to 20th Century
by Robert Goldwater
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars a must for art lovers, 9 Aug 2014
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very useful collection of writings by artists.


St. Ives
St. Ives
by Patrick Heron
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars ST Ives in Japan, 9 Aug 2014
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This review is from: St. Ives (Paperback)
interesting to see St Ives presented to a Japanese audience, with some Japanese texts included.


Critical Writings: v. 2
Critical Writings: v. 2
by Adrian Stokes
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Acquired taste, with its rewards…, 9 Aug 2014
A collection of rather obscurely written essays. Requires a particular turn of mind and perseverance.
An acquired taste.


British Studio Ceramics
British Studio Ceramics
by Paul Rice
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £26.95

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars British studio ceramics: a, 30 July 2012
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If what you are looking for is a historical account that relays and consolidates a narrow perspective on British studio ceramic history, you will not find anything to object to in this book. The works illustrated and described correspond more or less to the works the author has been engaging and dealing with as a collector and gallerist.
If, however, you think that a book about British studio ceramics should explore alternative to the consensus established on the reputations and values promoted by Bernard Leach and the St Ives school, the book will seem rather narrow and parochial -- not to say insular in a nationalist sense -- in the way it lessens or, rather, ignores the significance of alternative developments on the continent (with their emphasis on color and textured glazes ), and fail to consider how the course of ceramic history in Britain may have taken a different turn, had certain experiments carried out in France by people like Carriès, Delaherche, Dalpayrat and others -- available in the collection of the V & A, through a bequest made during WW1, but not displayed or publicized -- had been made known to studio potters and to the general public in the UK.
Having acknowledged these severe limitations the book has its purpose, for reference, but needs to be challenged in its assumptions, if you want to acquire an international rather than an insular perspective on British studio ceramics..
No revision of British studio ceramic history, however, can be inspired by this fundamentally conservative account; except as a reaction against it.


Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War
Mayflower: A Story of Courage, Community, and War
by Nathaniel Philbrick
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars The impossibility of peaceful cultural co-existence, 15 Feb 2011
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I bought this book to acquire an overview of the subject for a project about the Mayflower; and to get a version of history which, hopefully, would go beyond the safe clichés associated with the pilgrims and would avoid (neo)-colonialist bias, in the face of what was to develop into a genocide.
The book was informative and opened up interesting perspectives about the circumstances and motivations of the struggles which led to the demise of the Indian populations.
It also highlighted the precarious conditions under which the first settlers lived till they found ways of developing the capacity to cultivate their own food (ironically, learning the art of survival from the Indians they eventually wiped out).
The book offers a good introduction to the subject to someone totally new to it, in the form of an eminently readable narrative.
The presentation of how leaders of the two sides and their kins acted towards each other and towards the situation as it appeared on the ground was enlightening.
I guess that readers will form their own opinion about the moral of the story according to their own allegiances and ideology.
It is a shame that the establishment of the white settlers was achieved at the cost of suppressing the Indian populations and wiping out their culture.
One cannot imagine what sustained inter-cultural collaboration based on mutual respect would have produced, had the European not felt superior in the beliefs, their rights and their greed.
The anecdote recounted at the end (on the last page) suggests that a thread of humanity could, in some situations, manifest itself, amidst a struggle for power and survival according to the Darwinian laws of the 'jungle' and according to the principle of the survival of the fittest.


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