Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop Black Friday Deals Week in Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Amazon Fire TV Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Paperwhite Listen in Prime Shop Now Shop now
Profile for Philip Cowhig > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Philip Cowhig
Top Reviewer Ranking: 415,242
Helpful Votes: 61

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Philip Cowhig "Carbo-fuelled triathlete & Dad-bot. Audio-books are for training runs or long sessions on the turbo trainer." (UK)

Page: 1
VonHaus Heavy Duty Steel Boltless Workbench Worktable Metal Shelving Racking Massive 600 Kg Capacity: Free 2 Year Warranty
VonHaus Heavy Duty Steel Boltless Workbench Worktable Metal Shelving Racking Massive 600 Kg Capacity: Free 2 Year Warranty
Offered by DOMU UK
Price: £49.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Few niggles, easily fixed, but 5 stars for value and solidity., 2 Aug. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
5 stars for value for money and solidity. It is not seriously heavy duty but fine for a home garage or workshop. It is a bit fiddly to construct; I expect it is easier with two people than one but no big problems. A rubber mallet helps. The steel seems a little thicker than the tall 5 shelf unit, also from Von Haus, which I have also constructed. As others have mentioned, it helps to open up the slots on the uprights a little with a strong flat screwdriver. This eases the entry of the tabs. Mine arrived only with plastic feet - nothing for the tops of the uprights - but this doesn't bother me too much. The MDF surface just sits on top and moves around a little - easily fixed by drilling a hole in each corner and securing with cable ties. The MDF does not look very hard wearing and I'll look to put a protective mat on it. Despite these niggles it's 5 stars because you get a lot for the money.

Game of Death (2-Disc Platinum Edition) [1973] [DVD]
Game of Death (2-Disc Platinum Edition) [1973] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Bruce Lee
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £9.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Most of the time, that's not Bruce!, 4 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A real curiosity. I came to it just knowing it was put together after Lee's death, but the fight scenes were supposedly good and of course he has the yellow jumpsuit.... It is a pretty rubbish film in many respects and - SPOILER - most of the time Lee's character is played by a double. Any serious Lee fan will know this or spot it right away, and in some cases the attempts to disguise this are laughably clumsy. And the funeral scene is arguably in poor taste. The plot is not sophisticated and just serves to stitch together the footage that they had of Lee with other fight scenes in which he is "disguised". I managed to ignore this, turning my brain as far off as I could, but when I got to the final showdown in the "pagoda" (which makes little sense given the modern building to which the "plot" has relocated the action) I had a sudden shock of realisation when the real Bruce Lee finally appeared - so more charismatic and skillful than the body double. It is worth it for the fight scenes at the end, but you may prefer to fast-forward to those.

D-Link DHP-W310AV/B PowerLine AV 500 Wireless Extender
D-Link DHP-W310AV/B PowerLine AV 500 Wireless Extender

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hassle to set up, but it does work., 4 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I would not advise buying this if you are starting a Powerline network from scratch - and you probably won't be, as this is just for extending an existing D-Link Powerline network.

In my case I already had three D-Link Powerline units (about 2 years old) installed but need a 4th (my house is quite big and the walls are v thick). Long story short: I got it working with my existing three plus this one, but it was a lot of hassle. Seems to work fine now.

Long version: like many other reviewers I found that the documentation and software tools were not particularly helpful. I didn't try the help line because I had already read they were not much use. Installing the new unit (this one, that I'm reviewing) went fairly smoothly, following the simple instructions, although I had to do the "press button and dash to another room, press another button" routine more than once before the new unit was connected to the network. Once working, I was ready to sit back and enjoy my awesome home network when the complaints came flooding in - "internet was down" in the rest of the house. i.e. two of my original units had lost connectivity. I tried resetting these in various ways (power off, power on, press buttons to re-connect) in situ, but no luck. The D-Link software is supposed to detect all the active units on a network and let you configure them, but it doesn't. I am not a networking expert and didn't want to mess with the config too much anyway. My best guess is that the act of connecting the new unit changed the network security key and the others stopped connecting. In the end, as I think someone else suggested, I relocated all my units in the same room, near the router, avoiding power extension cables, and, one by one, performed a re-set (poke paperclip in hole) on the two unresponsive units. After that I did multiple attempts at re-establishing connectivity by means of pressing buttons and waiting. After a few attempts one connected, and then the other just seemed to remember how to work. Spookily, despite a re-set, it started working again with the wifi router name and password from before the re-set - that saved me a job but was a bit surprising. I re-located each unit back to its original spot and they all kept working

Performance is ok. There are plenty of warnings in other reviews that this system cannot cope with more than 2 or 3 units. My experience - 3 days on - is that it can. The only thing that's obviously compromised is streaming BBC iPlayer to a Smart TV, which on a couple of occasions has been so slow as to be unusable. While I was trying to figure that one out, it started working again. I have Virgin media broadband at >100 Mbs (in theory if not in practice) and iPlayer didn't hang up like that before, so I'm pretty sure it is the network and not the broadband. Based on a set of repeated tests with different devices and various bits of the network temporarily switched off, I can see that the LAN may work a bit faster with fewer Powerline units active in the network, but it's not conclusive. It also seems that one of my wifi units is often faster than a LAN connection just a metre or so away. It may be down to the hidden intricacies of the house wiring, it is hard to say. Overall I can't draw any clear conclusions. If I hit problems again I think I'll remove one of the LAN-only units and rely a bit more on wifi.

The other option would be to throw everything out and start fresh again with new units, but at the moment I don't need to resort to that.

Long, rambling feedback I know, but I hope it may be of help to someone. I certainly came back to this page several times while trying to de-bug my network.

The Looking Glass War (Push Me Plush Series)
The Looking Glass War (Push Me Plush Series)
by John Le Carré
Edition: Paperback

27 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not your average spy story, 15 May 2004
A bleak, unusual and compelling thriller. Fans of le Carre will know not to expect car chases and glamour, but this novel also has little of the complexity, puzzle-solving and intrigue of his better known spy stories.
The plot is fairly simple: a small and out-of-favour military intelligence department in London have a potentially huge discovery on their hands - an unconfirmed and sketchy report of Soviet missiles being stored in East Germany (the period is Cold War, early sixties). In a bid to confirm the discovery - and regain some of their former status and credibility - the department decides to find and train an agent to go over the border, something they have not done for many years.
The majority of the book is taken up with the preparation and training for the mission and the shifting politics and loyalties of those involved. This provides a strange mix of convincing technical detail and le Carre's always excellent character sketches and observations on a certain type of English character.
Without giving too much away of the story, the heart of the book is a study of ambition, resentment, jealousies and fading glories in the intelligence community during this period. The outcome of the mission is almost secondary, but the reader can discern the likely outcome as le Carre carefully reveals the endless possibilities of small details and judgements that can mean the difference between success and failure in this environment.
In conclusion, not your average spy story, not typical le Carre, but still engrossing and worth a read.

by J. G. Ballard
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

12 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars over-rated, annoying, a disappointment, 5 Dec. 2002
This review is from: Super-Cannes (Paperback)
Ballard can be infuriating. For sure he can pick some good themes and stir up controversy like few others, but he can turn out some real pap too, and this is one of them.
I could not believe the plaudits on the cover once I'd finished this. Were those reviewers reeading the same book? I guess it takes all tastes...
This isn't a thriller, because to be a good thriller it would have to be taut, pacy, rational and somehow believable. This isn't, some of the writing is indulgent and lazy. And the characters are such stock cliches that for a while I thought Ballard was going to do something clever with subverting the cliches, but he didn't.
And don't let anyone tell you that this is a novel of ideas - it isn't. Or at least not new or interesting ones. It goes like this: Big business + money = power = corruption. But power and corruption can lead to violence. And power and corruption and violence are sexy, aren't they kids? Hmm, what a problem. But in the end a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do, especially when he's our hero - a seen-it-all middle-aged man of honour, with standard mid-life-crisis accessories: beautiful young wife and old English sports car.
Oh come on.
As you can tell, I was really disappointed by this novel.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 25, 2009 2:59 PM BST

Fix-It Duck (Duck in the Truck)
Fix-It Duck (Duck in the Truck)
by Jez Alborough
Edition: Paperback

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars top notch waterfowl mayhem, 5 Dec. 2002
This is one of those books that I knew by heart within a week of owning it. My son (2.5 years when we first found the book) would have no other bedtime book for a long time. And he would shout out "Fix-it Duck" at the appropiate moments in the story.
Duck is one of those over-enthusiastic fellows who sweeps up his friends (Sheep, Goat and Frog) in a whirl of energy and good intentions, but with a never-ending trail of destruction behind him.
The story is told in easy-reading rhyme and the pictures are delightful, with plenty of little details to spot (handy for parents on endless repeat readings). Even the illustrations inside the front and back covers add to the story. Pay attention to what's happening!

Becoming A Mother
Becoming A Mother
by Kate Mosse
Edition: Paperback

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My wife and every other mother loves this book, 26 May 2000
This review is from: Becoming A Mother (Paperback)
A friend gave this book to my wife, who found it the most useful thing she read in her whole pregnancy. Since then, I've bought it for any friend who's become pregnant and they've all loved it. One said she had to ration herself to only a chapter a day as she didn't want to finish it too quickly.
I haven't read it myself, but my wife says Ms Mosse is supposed to be working on an equivalent for fathers. That, I'd read.

Page: 1