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Rupi's Dance
Rupi's Dance
Offered by jim-exselecky
Price: £15.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who else sounds this good after 35 years?, 5 Sep 2003
This review is from: Rupi's Dance (Audio CD)
In a recent interview, Ian Anderson said that one of the things that kept him going, after 35 years in the music business, was the determination to show that his best work was not behind him. Well, for those of us whose musical education began with such stellar albums as 'Thick as a Brick' and 'Passion Play' in the 1970s, these albums set a standard of musical literacy and sophistication that will always be impossible to match. And there have been times, over the years, when Anderson's artistic muse seemed to have deserted him.
But then suddenly in the mid-1990s, he produced two astonishing records - 'Divinities' and 'Roots to Branches' - that possessed all the virtues of the best Tull music from the past. Ian's next solo effort, 'Secret Language of Birds', continued in the same vein, and also contained some of his loveliest acoustic songwriting.
His latest album, 'Rupi's Dance', should silence the critics once and for all. The whole album finds Anderson at the peak of his creative and artistic powers, both as a songwriter and as a musician. The overall sound of the album is dominated by the infinitely subtle, clever, and varied inter-weaving of flute and acoustic guitar, with a string quartet and accordian thrown in for good measure. Each song is packed with melodic inventiveness and variety, and the melodies on some of the songs, such as 'My old black cat' and 'Lost in crowds', are particularly haunting and reminiscent of Ian's best songwriting from the 1970s.
Anderson's music defies all attempts at categorisation. It has been described as a blend of blues, jazz and celtic/english folk music, but this implies that it is a hybrid whereas it is really much more than that. Ian certainly draws on these and other influences, but he transforms them into something completely distinctive and original. Quite how he manages to do this has always been a mystery to me, but I suppose that is the nature of musical genius - it is innate and not dependent on outside influences. It's truly a blessing that he has given us so much great music over the years. That he should still be doing so after three and a half decades in the business is simply amazing.


Rupi's Dance
Rupi's Dance
Offered by jim-exselecky
Price: £15.99

21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who else sounds this good after 35 years?, 5 Sep 2003
This review is from: Rupi's Dance (Audio CD)
In a recent interview, Ian Anderson said that one of the things that kept him going, after 35 years in the music business, was the determination to show that his best work was not behind him. Well, for those of us whose musical education began with such stellar albums as 'Thick as a Brick' and 'Passion Play' in the 1970s, these albums set a standard of musical literacy and sophistication that will always be impossible to match. And there have been times, over the years, when Anderson's artistic muse seemed to have deserted him.
But then suddenly in the mid-1990s, he produced two astonishing records - 'Divinities' and 'Roots to Branches' - that possessed all the virtues of the best Tull music from the past. Ian's next solo effort, 'Secret Language of Birds', continued in the same vein, and also contained some of his loveliest acoustic songwriting.
His latest album, 'Rupi's Dance', should silence the critics once and for all. The whole album finds Anderson at the peak of his creative and artistic powers, both as a songwriter and as a musician. The overall sound of the album is dominated by the infinitely subtle, clever, and varied inter-weaving of flute and acoustic guitar, with a string quartet and accordian thrown in for good measure. Each song is packed with melodic inventiveness and variety, and the melodies on some of the songs, such as 'My old black cat' and 'Lost in crowds', are particularly haunting and reminiscent of Ian's best songwriting from the 1970s.
Anderson's music defies all attempts at categorisation. It has been described as a blend of blues, jazz and celtic/english folk music, but this implies that it is a hybrid whereas it is really much more than that. Ian certainly draws on these and other influences, but he transforms them into something completely distinctive and original. Quite how he manages to do this has always been a mystery to me, but I suppose that is the nature of musical genius - it is innate and not dependent on outside influences. It's truly a blessing that he has given us so much great music over the years. That he should still be doing so after three and a half decades in the business is simply amazing.


Rupi's Dance
Rupi's Dance
Offered by jim-exselecky
Price: £15.99

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Who else is this good after 35 years?, 4 Sep 2003
This review is from: Rupi's Dance (Audio CD)
Ian Anderson said in a recent interview that one of the things that kept him going, after 35 years in the rock music business, was his determination to prove that his best work was not behind him. Well, for those of us who have been fans of Ian and Jethro Tull since the band's heyday in the 1970s, the stellar albums of that period - from Aqualung (1970) to Minstrel in the Gallery (1975) - set a standard that will always be impossible to match. And there was a period in the 1980s when Ian's creative energies seemed to have deserted him.
But just when even the most devoted Tull fans were starting to lose hope, Ian confounded his critics by producing two astonishing masterpiece albums - 'Divinities' and 'Roots To Branches' - in the space of eighteen months in the mid-1990s. These albums possessed all the classic qualities of the best Tull albums of the 1970s, and in at least one respect - the quality of Ian's flute playing and arrangements - they actually surpassed the band's best efforts from those years. Ian's subsequent solo album, Secret Language of Birds, continued in the same vein, and in addition contained some of his most beautiful acoustic songwriting to date.
The sequel to that album, 'Rupi's Dance', should finally silence the critics once and for all. From beginning to end, this album is an emphatic declaration that Ian Anderson is back at the peak of his artistic and creative powers, and a reminder that he never really went away. Every song on this album is packed with haunting, beautiful melodies, and the arrangements - dominated by the infintely clever, subtle and varied inter-weaving of flute and acoustic guitar parts - are as inspired as the best Tull music from the 1970s. The stand-out tracks for me are 'My old black cat', 'Not Ralitsa Vassileva' and 'Two short planks', but in reality the whole album finds Anderson operating consistently at the height of his creative powers, both as a songwriter and a musician.
Ian Anderson's music is completely unique and defies all efforts at categorisation. It has been described as a blend of rock, blues and english/celtic folk music, but this implies that it is a hybrid of different musical styles, when in fact it is so much more. Ian certainly draws on these and other influences, but he goes on to transform them into music that is completely original and distinctive. Quite how he does this has always been a source of mystery to me, but I suppose that is the nature of musical genius - it is innate and not dependent on particular influences or stimuli. That he has given us so much great music over the years is truly a blessing; that he should be still doing so after three and a half decades is simply amazing.


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