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Humphrey Hawksley (London)

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The Prince of Risk
The Prince of Risk
by Christopher Reich
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 15.27

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Edgy, high concept, 31 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Prince of Risk (Hardcover)
Prince of Risk is superb. Bobby Astor is a hedge fund manager who lives on the edge. The hardware comes out in the discovery of a trained killer and weapons cache by Special Agent Alex Forza who is also Bobby's ex-wife. The opening is the murder of Bobby's estranged father who's CEO of the New York Stock Exchange, and the tipping point is the value of the Chinese currency -- on which Bobby has bet his shirt. Christopher Reich has woven these strands into a tense, page-turning and credible thriller capturing similar ground with finance and China as Clancy took with the Soviet Union and submarines in the 1980s. The new wars that will directly impact our lives will be fought with money, computers, hired guns and real-politique. The insight Reich shows in Prince of Risk is genuinely chilling.


The Geneva Option
The Geneva Option
Price: 2.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Crime and blood minerals, 29 Jun 2013
This review is from: The Geneva Option (Kindle Edition)
Adam Lebor penetrates deep into the workings of the United Nations in a way rarely tackled in a commercial thriller. He spotlights the horrific mineral war around the African Great Lakes which has killed millions in recent years, while supplying metals such as gold, tin and coltan to our cell phones and lap tops. Lebor achieves this with real characters in real situations. At times the blood boils because of reality of what he decsribes. A great achievement.


Traitor's Gate
Traitor's Gate
by Michael Ridpath
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 11.89

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Knife-edge moral choices, 29 Jun 2013
This review is from: Traitor's Gate (Hardcover)
Amid colourful and well-drawn characters, Michael Ridpath dissects divisions within the British and German governments in 1938 as war looms over Europe. As Traitor's Gate unfolds we see the blur and conflict of loyalty to country, friends, family, institution and personal values. None is clear. The conversation between Conrad de Lancey and the British ambassador to Berlin, Sir Nevile Henderson is enough to raise the hairs on the back of your neck in fury. This masterful novel is drawn from fact -- not least that in September 1938 Hitler was hours away from being ousted in a coup. But it never happened because Neville Chamberlain sued for peace.


The Economics of Killing: How the West Fuels War and Poverty in the Developing World
The Economics of Killing: How the West Fuels War and Poverty in the Developing World
by Vijay Mehta
Edition: Paperback
Price: 14.49

4.0 out of 5 stars Brave, provocative and in need of answers, 29 July 2012
This is a brave and original piece of work. By his own admission, Vijay Mehta chose a provocative title for The Economics of Killing in which he blames Western democracies for fuelling 'war and poverty in the developed world'. The research is meticulous and bolsters his argument, and whether you agree or not, Mehta makes a charge that goes to the heart of modern strategic policy making.

What exactly is this institution known as the military-industrial complex? Is it a force for good, an umbrella of benevolent power that revived Europe after the Second World and has allowed East Asia to flourish. Or has it allowed a few to get very rich, while seeking out wars and exploitation in poorer parts of the world.

The writing is lively and intelligent; the issue deep and important. All of us are becoming more and more entangled in the inter-connected world and Mehta makes clear that if we are to begin to understand what the future holds, we need to have answers to the questions he raises.


Edge of Nowhere
Edge of Nowhere
Price: 0.89

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Textured and gripping, 30 Dec 2011
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This review is from: Edge of Nowhere (Kindle Edition)
Michael Ridpath's short story is a murder mystery that takes us to one of the most isolated and wild corners of Iceland. Against this exotic backdrop comes an array characters from the ravishingly blonde mayoress of the remote town of Bolungarvik to a curmudgeonly suspect of a fisherman who had 'the rock-hard face of a man who spent a couple of decades battling the North Atlantic.' Magnus, the main charecter and former Boston homicide detective, will be familiar to readers of Ridpath's Fire & Ice series. This is suspense short story writing at its finest; much unfolded in very few words. I read over the course of a day on an I-phone.


My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time
My Dirty Little Book of Stolen Time
by Liz Jensen
Edition: Hardcover

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an uplifting gem, 27 Jun 2006
Liz Jensen is great. You never know what to expect and her latest is a gem. Jensen has stepped away from her darkside, portrayed in the fantastic Louis Drax, to give a light, enchanting, funning and infectious love story with a difference.


Q and A (filmed as Slumdog Millionaire)
Q and A (filmed as Slumdog Millionaire)
by Vikas Swarup
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A breakthrough first novel, 30 April 2005
Q & A is brilliant and stunning. From the boarish Colonel Taylor to the vulnerable Shankar, from the brothels of Agra to the seafront in Mumbai, every place and person has that brush and smell of India. I have rarely read anything more human or more accessible on modern India where Swarup touches lightly, yet provocatively on sensitive strands which run through its society. This is where Rohinton Mistry meets a 21st Century Somerset Maugham, portraying extremes of cruelty and kindness with understanding and compassion and without being judgemental. It is a book which hovers for a few days at the back of one's life with a yearning to return to it, while its characters and stories will linger for much longer.


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