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Andrew Johnson (Shifnal, Shropshire United Kingdom)
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Juju Village Large Heart Pink Wallet Case For Motorola Moto E With Screen Protector
Juju Village Large Heart Pink Wallet Case For Motorola Moto E With Screen Protector
Offered by Juju Village
Price: £5.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Versatile and practical case, 12 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
We bought the case for my daughter's phone to give it some protection and personalise it for her, She loves the design and colour.

On a more practical level the cover seems to be a padded foam which offers some good protection for the phone, the internal cover that encloses the phone is a thin plastic and not as sturdy as a more utilitarian phone glove but it holds the phone securely, I think the basic idea is that the padded case cover will take any impacts from drops. The bi-folding cover is a neat idea, we often see my daughter watching a video on the phone with it propped up inside it's case. Overall a nice looking case and practical.


Canon EOS 60DA ( 19 MP,3 -inch LCD )
Canon EOS 60DA ( 19 MP,3 -inch LCD )

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent for Astrophotography and (with a UV/IR filter) a good all rounder., 12 Feb. 2015
I bought my EOS60Da at an astro fair while my old EOS350D was still working. I did have daylight use in the back of mind when buying the camera because I thought it was odd that Canon would effectively ham string a camera as capable as the EOS60D by making it daylight only, strictly speaking my budget does not run to two cameras.

For Astronomy the camera is perfect the DIGIC IV processor and sensor seem to deliver some very sharp noise free imaging well up to ISO800, I have pushed it out to ISO6400 for panoramic shooting and it was starting to get quite grainy but I do most of my DSO imaging at ISO400 / ISO800 where this is not an issue. The extra IR sensitivity brings out all of the extra reds in many emission nebulae. I noted a marked difference between the images of M27 returned by my EOS350 compared to the EOS60Da, I have even started to pick-up hints of the outer shell of M57 with the Da so overall it's very impressive. Compared to my old DIGIC II EOS350D thermal noise is also much reduced, the 350 showed severe signs of thermal noise from the sensor, battery and processor over 4 minutes exposure so far this not been evident in 8-10m exposures in the 60Da. Addition points in it's favour are the swivel screen with live view which makes checking focus and images even when the scope is at zenith or awkward angles a doddle. The other winner is that the camera comes with a 240v AC adaptor so if you are close to a mains supply, batteries dying half way through a session are not an issue.

For daylight the camera does very well, let's face it you have an EOS60D in there much of which is lost on AP! The extra IR sensitivity is very noticeable on bright days and under tungsten lighting, flower blooms which have a high IR signature for insects are totally misrepresented by the sensor without an IR filter and no amount of WB adjustment resolves this. However, it's not a total loss I have swapped my UV Skylight filters on my lenses for UV/IR filters and the problem is gone. I tried several makes of UV/IR filter but settled on Hoya, unlike their cheaper rivals the Hoya filter does not add a Turquoise colour tint to my wide angle photos and allows me retain a neutral white balance for "Snaps" and video. I expect if you stood my filtered 60Da next to a Standard EOS60D and shot a landscape or wedding you'd see some slight colour differences if you looked critically. But my old EOS350 "Daylight" camera packed up within about a dozen shots of buying the EOS60Da so it has been used for landscapes, general photography and went on holiday with me, other than issues with the cheaper filters (now replaced and binned) I can't say I noticed a big difference.

My Astro and Daylight photos with the EOS60Da are on my Flickr page for those who want to compare, I think I even uploaded a few samples with and without the UV/IR filter on the EOS60Da.

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/atj_photos/


Canon EOS 60Da Body
Canon EOS 60Da Body
Offered by DB Technology srl
Price: £1,036.22

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Astro DSLR and with a good all rounder with UV/IR filters., 20 Sept. 2014
This review is from: Canon EOS 60Da Body (Electronics)
I go into astrophotography about 2 years ago with my old Canon EOS350D, it was a great camera but lacked a lot of refinements that a more modern DSLR has as standard. I always knew I'd eventually replace the 350D, I was getting err99 more frequently but it soldiered on. I was reluctant to splash out on a new camera while the 350D was working (most of the time). Meanwhile I had been looking at OSC CCDs and Astro-moded Canon DSLRs from the EOS1100D up to the EOS650D as possible candidates for replacement. When I saw an EOS 60Da heavily discounted at an astro fair I decided to buy one, just as well because the 350D died several hours later at the show!

I went for a 60Da over a dedicated OSC CCD, because all of the CCDs I was looking at could only be used with a telescope, buying a camera that wouldn't take family holiday snaps was never going to wash. I also strongly considered something like a EOS650D with a Baader IR mod and WB correction to get a modern 18Mp DSLR that would do all the family photos and take astro images, Vs an undiscounted 60Da it was the clear winner on cost. Problem was I do enjoy photography and liked the creative features of the EOS60D over the 650 or 700D, some of the neat features on my 350D only existed on the 60D and not on the 650/700D models, also I was a little concerned about warranties on a modded camera, so seeing a 60Da at a just a little more than a modded 650D was the clincher. The camera has all of the features of the EOS60D plus some important additions, first is the increased IR sensitivity and second the camera come with an AC mains adaptor as standard, great for those cold nights when you are imaging close to a mains source as you don't need to worry about battery discharge.

Astrophography:
For Astrophotography the camera is brilliant, the extra IR sensitivity really does bring out the nebulosity in objects that my un-modded 350D struggled with like the Veil and Pelican nebula, even comparing like for like shots of M27 there is a noticeable increase in visibility in the core jets in the centre of the nebula that my old 350D never managed to even hint at. The tillable LCD screen and live view make focussing with a Bahtinov mask a doddle and once set this screen can be rotated home and not used, preserving your night vision as the LCD display on the camera top shows all of the main settings you will need for shutter etc, the only exception is mirror lock-up but this can be added to the custom menu so it can accessed quickly or even set as a custom setting.

Daylight:
As noted above I bought the camera for it's standard EOS60 capabilities and astro capabilities, I don't have the budget for 2 DSLRs. For most things the camera is great, all of my EF and EF-S lenses from my now dead EOS350D work well with the camera and performs well in most conditions. Colour balance is usually fine on cloudy days but the camera struggles with objects with a high IR reflectivity, especially flower blooms. Fortunately this is easily fixed using a UV/IR filter on the lens, I have tried several but I can highly recommend the Hoya UV/IR filter, I have tried a budget brand which is good on telephoto lenses but leaves a heavy vignette on wide angle lenses.

Although Canon state this camera is not for daylight use, I have found that with the right IR filters it performs just as well, if not better than my old EOS Digital camera and has the added bonus of bringing out the detail in many of the astronomical objects that I go hunting for.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 5, 2015 12:53 AM GMT


Hoya 58mm UV and IR Cut Screw-in Filter
Hoya 58mm UV and IR Cut Screw-in Filter
Price: £57.02

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Restores true colour in my Canon EOS60Da when used in daylight., 20 Sept. 2014
After a lot of pondering I decided to fork out for one of these for my Canon EOS 60Da to replace a cheaper budget brand UV/IR filter that I was using. I was reasonably happy with the budget filter's performance in correcting the additional IR sensitivity in the EOS 60Da on bright days or at long focal lengths but it left a noticeable blue/green cast to photos especially when used in shade or cloudy conditions and with wide angle lenses. Having used and been impressed with Hoya filters in the past I gave this a shot to see if there was any improvement. The first thing I noted was the build quality was far superior and placed next to the budget UV/IR on a white surface the Hoya filter is almost clear when viewed straight on and although it shows a very slight viewed from an angle it is not the strong turquoise of the budget brands. The filter passes the "TV remote test" where the EOS 60Da or an astro modified camera will see the IR LED on the remote brightly lit when active without the filter and not at all with it.

In use the Hoya has a very slight turquoise vignette at the edge of the frame at 18mm using a kit 18-55mm lens which quickly vanishes as you zoom in unlike the budget brand which has a heavy green cast, visible even through the viewfinder at all ranged on the 18-55mm lens! The overall picture colour / white balance was using the Hoya was excellent and true to the conditions and gave a brighter picture overall, one reviewer says the Hoya looses about 1/2 f stop and I would concur.

In summary the Hoya, even discounted is 3x the price of a budget filter but in terms of attenuating excess IR in an astro-modified camera and retaining daylight colour balance it's well worth the cost.


Kodak Mini Pocket Waterproof Video Camera/ZM1 3X digital.1.8 inch LCD - Grey
Kodak Mini Pocket Waterproof Video Camera/ZM1 3X digital.1.8 inch LCD - Grey

1.0 out of 5 stars Neat idea badly executed., 15 Sept. 2014
On the face of it this is a neat compact camera, it takes nice pictures and video for it's size and is handy. We bought one for my daughter and she loved using it to take photos and video with it.

Sadly this is where the story ends I don't know where the durable claim comes from the flip out base is plastic, fiddly and snapped with my daughter using it in 6 months. the USB charge socket is a royal pain as it needs to be plugged direct to a pc or USB hub and has all of the weight of the camera on it wobbling and vulnerable to knocks. The latch to deploy the USB socket is right next to the micro-sd card, and touching this latch fires the sd card out of the slot and I do mean fires! The SD slot has a spring inside capable of launching the micro-SD card into low orbit the retaining latch is barely strong enough to hold limp asparagus let alone a ballistically tensioned SD card. Even being aware of this does not help as the sd card gets fired from the camera at almost any time, the result is that despite putting hands in place etc to catch the card we are now on card no 3 after 18month and although micro sd cards are reasonably cheap the mounting replacement cost and lost photos means this camera is about to be consigned to landfill.


BestDealUK 58mm UV IR Infrared UltraViolet Cut Blocking Lens Filter for DSLR DC CCD
BestDealUK 58mm UV IR Infrared UltraViolet Cut Blocking Lens Filter for DSLR DC CCD
Offered by Ultra Sales Global
Price: £14.71

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good UV/IR blocker for Canon EOS60Da using telephoto lenses, 18 July 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In a moment of weakness I bought a Canon EOS 60Da for astro photography as well as daylight photography, despite warnings from Canon that the EOS 60Da is not really a daylight camera. Unfortunately my venerable EOS 350D "backup" camera died within hours of purchasing the 60Da so I have been using the 60Da for normal photography. Overall the EOS 60Da works well as a conventional camera but as with most modified camera's with extra IR sensitivity for astro imaging it struggles in bright sunlight and especially with flower blooms which reflect a lot of IR, notably purples and pinks.

This filter has essentially fixed the problem at a fraction of the cost of a Hoya, B+W UV/IR or even an Astronomik OWB filter I now get good colour balance for daylight photography without having to set custom white balance or trying to sort it out post processing. Very effective and good value, I will be buying a couple more for my other lenses.

Update: My original tests and reviews were carried out with a 70-300mm USM Zoom lens under strong sunlight, I still hold to the comments made at the time, the filter does attenuate the IR to a point where colour balance is restored at high colour temperatures. However, several months on and having tried this filter in different conditions and with a wide angle lens I have been forced to re-appraise it and buy a Hoya UV/IR for my 18-55mm lens. The issue at low focal lengths is that green / blue tint is very noticeable as a strong vignette on a bright day at 18 - 24mm and on a cloudy day / shade the whole picture takes on a heavy turquoise cast, for this reason I have reduced my initial rating to 3 stars. It can be corrected in processing to some extent but the vignette remains visible. Having now splashed out on a Hoya UV/IR the difference in quality is quite marked. I will still be using this filter on my 70-300mm but for all other non- telephoto work I'm going to have stick with the Hoya.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 22, 2014 1:21 PM BST


Turn Left at Orion: Hundreds of Night Sky Objects to See in a Home Telescope - and How to Find Them
Turn Left at Orion: Hundreds of Night Sky Objects to See in a Home Telescope - and How to Find Them
by Guy Consolmagno
Edition: Spiral-bound
Price: £22.49

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent beginners guide, 22 May 2014
In these days of goto mounts and digital imagery from Hubble and terrestrial images it's easy to forget that the Mk1 eyeball and a basic understanding of where things are in the night sky are the basics of astronomy. This book sets out the basics of how to use a telescope and find your way around the night sky as clearly as any other guide that I have seen. There are plenty of excellent finder charts to help you observe many of the fascinating objects that are out there but equally importantly it set's expectations by giving examples of what you are actually likely to see through an eyepiece with different types of scope rather than presenting a Hubble image typically used in planetarium software which you are unlikely to see with the naked eye. As one reviewer has commented this book should either be included with every new "starter scope" or at the very least be required reading I certainly refer a lot of newbie astronomers to it as a starter.


LINDY CR2025 Battery (2 pack) - Panasonic Lithium Coin Cell 3V
LINDY CR2025 Battery (2 pack) - Panasonic Lithium Coin Cell 3V
Offered by Prime Furnishing
Price: £1.04

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does the job, 19 May 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It was case of pay silly prices for Polar to replace the battery on my Heart monitor or do it your self.

Both batteries arrived quickly, expiry date is March 2023 in the ones I received and for 70p plus some time I have a working watch again - bargain.


I-Spy In the Night Sky (Michelin I-Spy Guides)
I-Spy In the Night Sky (Michelin I-Spy Guides)
by Michelin Tyre PLC
Edition: Paperback
Price: £2.50

4.0 out of 5 stars A good guide and incentive for younger observers, 12 Feb. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this for my son who likes to view the stars when I have the scope set-up. I did wonder if the style would continue to appeal to the 21st centaury console playing generation but it has gone down well. The brief but simple explanation of various objects is enough to pique curiosity and awarding "points" for objects seen, places visited etc seems to provide my ardent little Mario & Sonic fan an incentive to want to put down the console and come outside to not only see what's up there but to ask to see some objects. I was initially concerned this was going to lead to a box ticking exercise but we've been back to a few since because he liked seeing them, I may need to find another telescope!


Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas
Sky & Telescope's Pocket Sky Atlas
by Roger W. Sinnott
Edition: Spiral-bound
Price: £12.91

5.0 out of 5 stars Never far from my Telescope, 12 Feb. 2014
As a field guide I find this book excellent and it is in constant use when I go out stargazing or am planning a stargazing session, even with my GOTO mount. The book is logically laid out and shows most of the objects that you are likely to try and observe with an average telescope, whether you actually see them or not depends on your scope aperture and seeing conditions but you will get a good idea of where to go looking. The spiral binding makes it easy to fold open at a given page and the rear cover provides a good overview of the constellations that are visible on each page / section. Additionally each 10 page section starts with a brief summary giving a broad description of when the objects are seen at their best (directly overhead).


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