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Eoin McAuley (Dublin, Ireland)
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2 x STATUS FIREGLOW 60W Classic BC B22 Light Bulbs, Bayonet Cap, Red Glow
2 x STATUS FIREGLOW 60W Classic BC B22 Light Bulbs, Bayonet Cap, Red Glow
Offered by LightingandMobileAccessoriesUK
Price: £2.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 7 Mar. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
What I wanted, delivered on time.


PortaPow 2.5A Quad USB Wall Charger with 3 Year Guarantee (UK Plug)
PortaPow 2.5A Quad USB Wall Charger with 3 Year Guarantee (UK Plug)

5.0 out of 5 stars Charger for Ipad, 17 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Apple make a number of almost identical chargers, with tiny print on them in grey on white - some are capable of charging an iPad, and some aren't. The description of this item made it quite clear that it is capable of charging an ipad and other devices as well.


HP 608421-001 DS92 AC Adapter Charger Power Cord for HP Compaq C300/C500/C700
HP 608421-001 DS92 AC Adapter Charger Power Cord for HP Compaq C300/C500/C700
Price: £25.38

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Power supply at a good price, 17 Aug. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It's great to find a power supply that is exactly what it says it is. I needed a supply for a particular computer, and the description of this made it quite clear what computers it would work with.


Shadowmarch: Shadowmarch Trilogy Book One (Shadowmarch Quartet)
Shadowmarch: Shadowmarch Trilogy Book One (Shadowmarch Quartet)
by Tad Williams
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Dull and Pedestrian, 22 April 2008
Tad Williams follows in the grand old tradition of Robert Jordan in stretching a tale out to fill a hefty book without actually adding to it at all. This tale starts out well, but hundreds (thousands?) of pages later, not a lot has happened.

The characters are likable but, despite the hundreds of pages of description, never get beyond being cardboard cut-out characters: the feisty young princess, the methodical dwarf, the worldly-wise guardsman and so on.

I had the additional problem that nowhere on my edition did it say that it was the first volume of a trilogy; obviously the author had neglected to tell the publishers this. I bought this thinking it was a self-contained novel. I was about half way through before I figured out that not only had nothing happened in the first half, but nothing was going to happen in the second half either.

I will not be buying volume 2 of the trilogy.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Oct 25, 2008 5:21 AM BST


Knots: Mathematics with a Twist
Knots: Mathematics with a Twist
by Alexei Sossinsky
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.95

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gentle introduction to a complex mathematical topic, 13 Sept. 2005
This is an excellent little book. If you've always wondered about knot theory, this provides all that you need to get you hooked on this fascinating topic.
The book explains everything in simple diagrams, and doesn't require any great proficiency in algebra. A geometrical intuition is more important. A number of topics are covered and they are treated independently so that you can dip into the book and just read a chapter without having read the rest.
The main topics covered are:
Knots as atoms. 2d representations of knots and Reidemeister moves. Braids. Invariants: the Conway polynomial; the Jones polynomial. The arithmetic of knots. Recent discoveries.

There are a number of minor mistakes in the book, from typographical errors (an x in the wrong place) to a wrong assertion (that the figure eight knot and the trefoil have the same Conway polynomial - they don't). These are not important and won't lead you too far astray if you are paying attention.
Nicely presented and nicely bound, this book is a delight!


The Decipherment of Linear B (Canto)
The Decipherment of Linear B (Canto)
by John Chadwick
Edition: Paperback

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A popular account by an expert, 8 Jun. 2005
The decipherment of this ancient Mycenaean script from about 1400 BC was one of the great mystery stories of the 20th Century. John Chadwick is an expert in archaic Greek, who assisted Michael Ventris in deciphering the thousands of clay tablets discovered in the ruins of Knossos and Pylos. Ventris's demonstration that the language was an archaic form of Greek rocked the world of Ancient Greek history. In this book, Chadwick gives a popular account of the decipherment, somewhat light on the technical details of Ventris's discoveries, but with a good section on what the translated records show of Mycenaean society. The book was written in the 1950s but has a modern postscript which shows that most of the original findings still stand today.


The Alphabet
The Alphabet
by David Sacks
Edition: Hardcover

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An easy to read but complete history of the alphabet, 11 Mar. 2004
This review is from: The Alphabet (Hardcover)
This book by David Sacks is excellent. It gives the full history of the alphabet from the first known alphabetic inscriptions up to modern-day uses. There's plenty of information mixed with stories about the letters, examples of their use in advertising and diagrams of their evolution.
One problem with the book is that it originated as 26 separate articles in a newspaper, one for each letter. These have been tied together, making one chapter for each letter and an introductory section, but there is still a fair amount of repetition, because the story of the Phoenician alphabet ends up being repeated in just about every chapter. Extra sections on subjects like the evolution of printing are thrown into the middle of chapters as "insets", but these can take four or five pages, so the flow of reading is constantly being interrupted. Even within these, pictures can have long titles stretching to half a page, the reading of which interrupts the flow of the inset. So it's not an easy book to read.
Another possible problem is that the book accepts as incontrovertible the origin of Semitic writing in Egypt in 2000 BC, and cites as evidence the two inscriptions found in Wadi El Hol. These are not as convincing as the author seems to think and are not as far as I can tell universally accepted.
All in all, though, an excellent book.


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