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Leila Rasheed

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Who Framed Klaris Cliff?
Who Framed Klaris Cliff?
by Nikki Sheehan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Really original!, 16 Jun 2014
I enjoyed this very much. It's original, clever, funny and well written. I'm looking forward to her next one. I'm an adult but if you're buying for a child, I'd recommend it for any confident readers aged 9 + even though the characters are young teens.


First World war Britain (Shire Living Histories)
First World war Britain (Shire Living Histories)
Price: £0.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I was expecting, 27 April 2014
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This was not quite what I expected. I was hoping for something that focused more on the specific *changes* the population faced at the outbreak of war and after - how daily life changed. Looking at the product description again, I notice that the author is named as Lucinda Gosling rather than Peter Doyle, so I wonder if the rest of the description also applies to a different book.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 8, 2014 9:01 AM BST


Horses Don't Fly
Horses Don't Fly
Price: £1.98

5.0 out of 5 stars I'm so pleased to have discovered this book, 27 April 2014
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This review is from: Horses Don't Fly (Kindle Edition)
This is an absolutely charming memoir. Frederick Libby grew up a cowboy, travelled across the USA and Canada, and ended up enlisting in the Canadian army and shipping off to war, pretty much by chance. The way he tells his story, he puts a good deal of his subsequent successes as an observer and pilot down to luck, but it's easy to see that he must have been an extraordinarily talented and intelligent man. His narrative voice is authentic and it's impossible not to come away from the book with a great liking for, as well as admiration for, this modest, good humoured man. The afterword by his grand-daughter is equally interesting, in my view - I could have stood to hear a lot more about this family!


Let's Feed the Ducks
Let's Feed the Ducks
by Pamela Venus
Edition: Board book
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars All the books in this series are fantastic, 23 Mar 2014
This review is from: Let's Feed the Ducks (Board book)
My 21 month old really enjoys these books. They have the same kind of appeal as Shirley Hughes. He loves seeing other children doing things that he enjoys too (feeding ducks, swinging, etc.). The text is the right length to hold his attention and is well-written. Plus, this series is pretty much the only one I've found that features non-white children doing everyday, normal things in Britain. All other picture books I've found with non-white *main* characters are either set in a foreign country, or are tales of hardship/ exclusion/ difference in some way. That's pretty sad, in 2014.


Coconut Unlimited
Coconut Unlimited
by Nikesh Shukla
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.50

4.0 out of 5 stars Very funny! Sort of like an Asian Nick Hornby., 23 Mar 2014
This review is from: Coconut Unlimited (Paperback)
I really enjoyed this book. Anyone who has '90s memories will too - remember standing in a record store, not knowing how to tell which records were good, not being able to waste £10 on something rubbish, not daring to ask the cool people who worked there... yeah, that. I hope the author writes something YA sometime (and I mean that as a compliment). He captures teenage embarrassment and hubris perfectly.


Sailing Through Byzantium
Sailing Through Byzantium
by Maureen Freely
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An extraordinary place and time, 13 Nov 2013
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Fascinating and moving, this is the story of a child caught up in events she hardly understands. The narrator's key-hole view gives us glimpses of the lies and rumours that shadow the characters and their actions. A complex, believable picture of Istanbul's vivid ex-pat society, captured at a unique moment in history.


Shuttlecock
Shuttlecock
by Graham Swift
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.85

5.0 out of 5 stars Sad, funny, dark, profound, convincing, 4 April 2013
This review is from: Shuttlecock (Paperback)
It's some time since I've read a novel like this, so strong that the lingering taste of it stops me from picking up other books even after finishing it. I did have doubts about the 'end of Psycho' style explanatory chapter at the end, but then what followed impressed me all over again. This is a demanding and totally convincing novel. I shall read everything else he's written.


Torn
Torn
Price: £2.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book, 7 Jan 2013
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This review is from: Torn (Kindle Edition)
I want to echo the other 5 star reviews. This is a brilliantly constructed, tight, clever book. The plot's not all that original, but it really doesn't matter. The characters are really well-drawn and the narrative is vivid and fast paced without ever losing depth. There's a certain moment when the narrator reveals something about her past, something that changes your opinion of her completely, that made me actually stop and go 'No way.' out loud. A fantastic mixture of strong, rounded characters and suspenseful plotting. Highly recommended.


The Kite Princess
The Kite Princess
by Juliet Clare Bell
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.74

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book with a positive role model for girls, 5 Oct 2012
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This review is from: The Kite Princess (Paperback)
This is a lovely book with lots of rhyme and rhythm to keep the story bouncing along. Barefoot books are always beautifully produced, with a CD included. If you're tired of soppy 'good girl' stories, this is the perfect antidote - a heroine who wants her freedom and isn't afraid to go and get it. Lots of fun!


The Map of Marvels
The Map of Marvels
by David Calcutt
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tale of tales, 21 Sep 2010
This review is from: The Map of Marvels (Paperback)
This is a perfectly crafted, vividly imagined novel which draws on the Arabian Nights to create a tale about tales, a story about story-telling. Connor is trying to draw a map while his little sister Alice builds a tower of toys. Somehow, the map and tower become intertwined, and when Connor knocks the tower over, he is pulled into a world of strange magic, a world which he begins to realise, is intricately linked with Alice's game. In form, it's a fairy tale for older children, with plenty of scary bits and extraordinary adventures. It leads the reader to question the difference between truth and fiction, and the thought-provoking ending means it is one of those books you think about for a long time after finishing. I can see it capturing the imagination of thoughtful children aged 9 - 12, but to be honest it could be read with enjoyment by people of any age.


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