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The Bitter Pill: An Insider's Shocking Exposé of the Irish Health System: An Insider's Shocking Expose of the Irish Health System
The Bitter Pill: An Insider's Shocking Exposé of the Irish Health System: An Insider's Shocking Expose of the Irish Health System
by Doctor X
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Diagnosis of the irish health system., 11 Dec. 2014
Very well written book. I found it in my local library lately. It is similar to Irish Apartheid by Sarah Burke. The doctor who wrote it remains anonymous, for reasons he makes clear in the course of the book. He(?) obviously knows what he is talking about though and lacerates our failing health system and explains very clearly why it is failing and why it is in certain peoples financial interest for it to continue failing. An excellent read, well worth your time if you live in Ireland and plan on living to an age when you will need medical care.


Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch
Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch
by Nick Davies
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.00

2 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Toffs bickering amongst themselves, 31 Oct. 2014
I gave up on this after 150 pages. I was disappointed with this book. I loved Flat Earth News, Davies earlier book. I just couldn't care about this story. Apart from Davies and one or two others, I found it hard to give a toss about any of the characters in this book. I accept that hacking people's voicemail is wrong, but I really couldn't care less about the "victims", people like Hugh Grant and Sienna Miller and the royal family. Technology is watching all of us nowadays. I don't like the police, I don't like tabloids and I don't like whiny narcissistic celebrities. Oh boohoo, did your voicemail get hacked and did your personal life get splashed across the gutter press? Oh well, take a nice long holiday in a five star, sun dappled paradise, I'm sure that will soften the blow. The rest of us nobodies don't have to worry about these luxury problems.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Dec 4, 2014 7:56 PM GMT


News from a New Republic: Ireland in the 1950s
News from a New Republic: Ireland in the 1950s
by Tom Garvin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.50

4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting read, 18 May 2014
This is a well written book. Garvin gives an overview of Ireland in the 1950s, from newspaper and magazine articles published at the time. He paints a picture of Ireland that is totally different from now, yet eerily familiar in its attitudes and class divisions. He has a very good eye for an interesting or humorous anecdote. I agree with a lot of the opinions he expresses about Ireland, then and now. This book helps me to better understand the country I live in. I would recommend it.


GAAconomics
GAAconomics
by Michael Moynihan
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Two much airtime given to greedy clowns in lovely suits., 17 April 2014
This review is from: GAAconomics (Paperback)
This is an OK book. Moynihan marshalls his material well and covers a lot of ground and topics. However, too often it reads like PR fluff that the GAA could have produced from its marketing department. Too much time is given to "serious" people in their nice suits and respectable accents. Like a lot of media coverage in Ireland, only those with money get to put their side of the story across. The GAA is heading for trouble, if it thinks it can keep demanding that people give their time for free at "the grassroots", while a bunch of greedy grabbers at the top of an increasingly rapacious and dictatorial organisation grab as much money as they can from any source, AIG, Sky Sports, Etihad, etc., regardless of moral concerns about the source of this money. This book is too one-sided, too positive and too uncritical. The GAA makes me nauseous a lot of the time now. Still, I finished this book, which is a good sign, and if you want a snapshot of how out of touch our elite ruling class is from the rest of us, you could do worse than read this book.


Babysitting George
Babysitting George
by Celia Walden
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £16.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting read, 19 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Babysitting George (Hardcover)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is a fascinating insight into the death throes of a footballing legend. She treats the subject with compassion and sensitivity. To all the people in other reviews, bleating about the media exploiting poor defenseless George, he made his booze money in later years by selling his car-crash of a life to the newspapers, in exchange for his drink money. He had no other source of income. He was not a helpless victim. I also like that Walden doesn't buy the idea that alcoholism is a disease. No pathology, no disease. Alcohol addiction is a self-destructive behaviour. Calling it a disease is a cop-out for the alcoholic, giving them an excuse to continue drinking. Walden is a good writer, she held my attention from start to finish. The book has the ring of truth about it. The two women in the book have questioned the veracity of the story, but what else would they do, when they want to sue and make money off Bloomsbury. I recommend this book. At times sad, to see how alcohol destroyed Best, but worthwhile reading.


The Men's Health Book: A Guide for the Irish Man
The Men's Health Book: A Guide for the Irish Man
by Dr Mark Rowe
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.95

5.0 out of 5 stars Very good health advice, 9 Nov. 2012
I found this book very informative and helpful. It is easy to read and is very funny at times. I borrowed it from the library, but it would work best if you buy it and use it as a reference book.


Shapely Ankle Preferr'd: A History of the Lonely Hearts Advertisement
Shapely Ankle Preferr'd: A History of the Lonely Hearts Advertisement
by Francesca Beauman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Committed Bachelor, 34, seeks solitude!, 27 Sept. 2012
This is a lovely book. Well-written, easy to read, and full of interesting, and sometimes hilarious, ancecdotes about the Lonely Hearts ad, and the people who use it, since it first appeared in the late 17th century. I laughed out loud at some of the stories of peoples search for love. I picked this book up by chance in my local library, books about romance are not usually my thing, but I am very glad I did. This book is also useful for any man who wishes to understand better female psychology and motivation when approaching the dating and matrimonial game. This book contains some very astute observations about the ongoing struggle between the genders. Highly recommended, and I shall be keeping my eyes open for any more books by Francesca Beauman.


The Governor
The Governor
by John Lonergan
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A very worthwhile, educational, well-written book, 11 Sept. 2011
This review is from: The Governor (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It is short, only 240 pages, but it gives a very clear picture of the problems in the Irish prison system, and the Irish Civil Service in general. Lonergan comes across as a decent, honest, humane person, who genuinely cares about the prisoners he looked after in Mountjoy. He is his own man, and he is not afraid to criticise people in the Dept of Justice or the Prison Service, who put their own petty self-interest ahead of the greater good. The strongest parts of the book are the anecdotes he tells about some of the prisoners he met during his time in Mountjoy and their tragic lives which led them to committing the crimes that got them locked up. Also the first two chapters in which he describes his childhood in rural Co. Tipperary are very evocative of a recent, idyllic but lost past. A must-read for anyone who cares about justice in Ireland.


Pink Gimble Traveler hands free reading tool.
Pink Gimble Traveler hands free reading tool.
Offered by Very Bazaar
Price: £5.57

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Product, 24 Aug. 2011
This is an excellent product for readers. I bought the white one, it is the least obtrusive colour, it blends in well with the white paper of any book. Pink would stand out too much and distract me from the book. This Gimble is different from the last one in that it is adjustable to pretty much any book size. It will work on any standard paperbook size, I also tried it on a fairly hefty hardback (it worked) and on a 1100 page doorstop of a paperback (it worked). While the product has three notches (A,B,C) for different book sizes, I just adjust it to the size of the book I am reading and it holds the book perfectly. I have tried other book stands, and the Gimble is the best. Some book holders damage the books, because they exert too much force on the paperback to hold it open, and can damage the book (especially old library books, with weak or damaged spines). The Gimble is gentle and won't leave any mark on the book. This product also folds up to a very small size, when you are not using it. It takes a little getting used to, when you are used to holding a book open with your hands, but with a little bit of habituation, you can't live without it!! Highly recommended for any reader.


Taking the Medicine: A Short History of Medicine's Beautiful Idea, and our Difficulty Swallowing It
Taking the Medicine: A Short History of Medicine's Beautiful Idea, and our Difficulty Swallowing It
by Druin Burch
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very enjoyable history of medicine., 10 July 2011
I really enjoyed reading this book. A history of medicine and an explanation of how the double-blind randomised controlled trial helped to create scientific evidence-based medicine. He weaves the two tales together expertly. Some wonderful anecdotes are also included, including some of the heroes and villains of medicine in the last 200 years. The story about Archie Cochrane brought tears to my eyes. That guy is a legend. This book follows the template of all the best popular science books I have read, mixing scientific theory with riveting story-telling. Highly recommended!!


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