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bernie "xyzzy" (Arlington, Texas)
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[ WHEN HITLER STOLE PINK RABBIT ] BY Kerr, Judith ( Author ) Jan - 2009 [ Paperback ]
[ WHEN HITLER STOLE PINK RABBIT ] BY Kerr, Judith ( Author ) Jan - 2009 [ Paperback ]
by Judith Kerr
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Personal view of history, 22 May 2015
Anna only knows she is Jewish because her father says so. However it is enough to force the family to flee Germany (1933) due to the on coming of the Nazi regime. She will travel to several countries learning the language and staying one step ahead of the spreading Nazi influence. In her travels she learns of many concepts which include the confiscation of her "Pink Rabbit."

Many books unintentionally talk down to children. Not this book it looks you right in the eye. Anna still maintains the innocence of her youth. But the problems and dealing with people can happen at any age.

The story is told from the perspective of Anna. And not too surprisingly, it parallels that of the author and illustrator Judith Kerr who was forced to leave Germany in 1933.


Frankenstein
Frankenstein
by Mary Shelley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.73

3.0 out of 5 stars "Cursed, cursed creator.", 22 May 2015
This review is from: Frankenstein (Paperback)
Victor grew up reading the works of Paracelsus, Agrippa, and Albertus Magnus, the alchemists of the time. Toss in a little natural philosophy (sciences) and you have the making of a monster. Or at least a being that after being spurned for looking ugly becomes ugly. So for revenge the creature decides unless Victor makes another (female this time) creature, that Victor will also suffer the loss of friends and relatives. What is victor to do? Bow to the wishes and needs of his creation? Or challenge it to the death? What would you do?

Although the concept of the monster is good, and the conflicts of the story well thought out, Shelly suffers from the writing style of the time. Many people do not finish the book as the language is stilted and verbose for example when was the last time you said, "Little did I then expect the calamity that was in a few moments to overwhelm me and extinguish in horror and despair all fear of ignominy of death."

Much of the book seems like travel log filler. More time describing the surroundings of Europe than the reason for traveling or just traveling. Many writers use traveling to reflect time passing or the character growing in stature or knowledge. In this story they just travel a lot.

This book is definitely worth plodding through for moviegoers. The record needs to be set strait. First shock is that the creator is named Victor Frankenstein; the creature is just "monster" not Frankenstein. And it is Victor that is backwards which added in him doing the impossible by not knowing any better. The monster is well read in "Sorrows of a Young Werther," "Paradise Lost," and Plutarch's "Lives." The debate (mixed with a few murders) rages on as to whether the monster was doing evil because of his nature or because he was spurned?


[(The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)] [Author: Simon Winchester] published on (July, 2005)
[(The Professor and the Madman: A Tale of Murder, Insanity, and the Making of the Oxford English Dictionary)] [Author: Simon Winchester] published on (July, 2005)
by Simon Winchester
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars When you think, you read it all something new pops up, 22 May 2015
The book is well balanced between the history of the OED and the life and times of Dr. William Minor, (a major contributor).

Simon Winchester can hold back all the good stuff and disperse it throughout his writing. So just when you think you read it all, some new fact or weird quirk shows up. Interspersed with the story are relevant definitions, as they would appear in the OED. His description of Broadmoor makes you want to sign up on the waiting list.


84 Charing Cross Road (VMC) by Hanff, Helene New Edition (2002)
84 Charing Cross Road (VMC) by Hanff, Helene New Edition (2002)
by Helene Hanff
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Better than reading someone's diary, 22 May 2015
Like many people, I saw a movie first. Naturally, due to media constraints, you expect certain amount of the book to be homogenized. Therefore, I wanted to read what was missing. To my amazement very little was missing or modified. I do not normally read this sort of book. Therefore, I was surprised at finding myself wanting more when it finished.

In addition, until I read the book I did not realize that Charing Cross Road was a real place. The whole book is based on a collection of correspondence between Helene Hanff, an avid book reader, and Frank Doel an agent for British bookseller.

My wife has taken this one-step further and is collecting all the books that were mentioned in the correspondence. Some of these books appear to have been reprinted due to this publication.

If you can find it there is a book called "The Library of Helene Hanff."
I wonder what became of all the other people described in the correspondents after the book.

84 Charing Cross Road the movie


Powerha Systemmirror for IBM I Cookbook
Powerha Systemmirror for IBM I Cookbook
by IBM Redbooks
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars This process is not intuitive and you will need this book, 22 May 2015
PowerHA is always threatening to go away; however there is not another mature replacement. Most IBM users will come to the point where they need it.

It is a good idea to have this book before you need the system so you can do some strategic planning.

Once you start to apply PowerHA you will not want to make assumptions that can cost time and money to correct. You can also paint you self in a corner if you do not watch out.

The biggest mistake PowerHA systems people make is why this book is so important. It is called preventative maintenance. People thing if it is not broken do not fix it. However this is like any other electronic stem and needs to be periodical updated or thrown away. The user does not want to find him/her self saying "But it has worked until now" or "the other system is the same and it works".


The Zimmermann Telegram: Intelligence, Diplomacy and America's Entry into World War I
The Zimmermann Telegram: Intelligence, Diplomacy and America's Entry into World War I
by Thomas Boghardt
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £26.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Fewer but stronger words I always say, 22 May 2015
I came to learn about the Zimmerman Telegram in a sort of backward way; I learned about it in a German history class at school.

It was interesting but not until I saw that there was a Barbara Tuchman book (author of "The Guns of August") did I decide to dive in a little deeper.

You will be intrigued and find that even though the main subject of the book is the Zimmerman Telegram that it is the various people involved that makes the story come to life.

"The Americans were always calling upon the Munro doctrine as if it was some sort of covenant established by God, giving them rights over the rest of the hemisphere. Wilhelm believed that if God were going to play favorites He would choose Germany."


Jaws
Jaws
by Peter Bechley
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars Stop, hey what's that sound, 22 May 2015
This review is from: Jaws (Hardcover)
There's something happinin here
What it is ain't exactly clear (Buffalo Springfield)

So this is "The" book behind the film. Now let's forget about the film.

I like stories about big bugs, dangerous plants, and was looking forward to voracious sharks. What I got was a love story and a dead cat. I do not like stories where the bad guys have to pick on cats and dogs to show how bad they are. Not even sharks look for cat chow or doggie snacks.

We start out with a great premise of a displaced shark that just needs a kinibble on the way to where ever he is going. There is a consciences sheriff that does not want people feeding the wildlife (especially with their bodies). A standard money grubbing business man that wants the beaches left open.

A few bites now and then "and the search is on" makes for a great read. Then we forget about the shark and the havoc to concentrate on a woman with bodily needs (in very graphic pros.) Back to the shark and again forget about the shark again as the family pet gets dispatched (in very graphic pros.) Then back to the shark and captain Ahab.

Nice ending sort of makes up for the straying off target middle.


Welcome to the Monkey House
Welcome to the Monkey House
by Kurt, Jr. Vonnegut
Edition: Library Binding

4.0 out of 5 stars This book tries to explain how the mind works, 22 May 2015
Before one can understand artificial intelligence one should understand the real thing.

This book has lots of fin diagrams as it explained the complexities of what is not one whole comprehensive entity but the "society of the Mind."

It may be a tad dated but the concept is still solid.

And now for something a tad more dated:

Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics by Alfred Korzybski


The Scociety of Mind
The Scociety of Mind
by Marvin L. Minsky
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars This book tries to explain how the mind works, 22 May 2015
This review is from: The Scociety of Mind (Paperback)
Before one can understand artificial intelligence one should understand the real thing.

This book has lots of fin diagrams as it explained the complexities of what is not one whole comprehensive entity but the "society of the Mind."

It may be a tad dated but the concept is still solid.

And now for something a tad more dated:

Science and Sanity: An Introduction to Non-Aristotelian Systems and General Semantics by Alfred Korzybski


Frankenstein
Frankenstein
by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.00

3.0 out of 5 stars "Cursed, cursed creator.", 22 May 2015
This review is from: Frankenstein (Paperback)
Victor grew up reading the works of Paracelsus, Agrippa, and Albertus Magnus, the alchemists of the time. Toss in a little natural philosophy (sciences) and you have the making of a monster. Or at least a being that after being spurned for looking ugly becomes ugly. So for revenge the creature decides unless Victor makes another (female this time) creature, that Victor will also suffer the loss of friends and relatives. What is victor to do? Bow to the wishes and needs of his creation? Or challenge it to the death? What would you do?

Although the concept of the monster is good, and the conflicts of the story well thought out, Shelly suffers from the writing style of the time. Many people do not finish the book as the language is stilted and verbose for example when was the last time you said, "Little did I then expect the calamity that was in a few moments to overwhelm me and extinguish in horror and despair all fear of ignominy of death."

Much of the book seems like travel log filler. More time describing the surroundings of Europe than the reason for traveling or just traveling. Many writers use traveling to reflect time passing or the character growing in stature or knowledge. In this story they just travel a lot.

This book is definitely worth plodding through for moviegoers. The record needs to be set strait. First shock is that the creator is named Victor Frankenstein; the creature is just "monster" not Frankenstein. And it is Victor that is backwards which added in him doing the impossible by not knowing any better. The monster is well read in "Sorrows of a Young Werther," "Paradise Lost," and Plutarch's "Lives." The debate (mixed with a few murders) rages on as to whether the monster was doing evil because of his nature or because he was spurned?


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