Profile for W. Thielemans > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by W. Thielemans
Top Reviewer Ranking: 4,830,587
Helpful Votes: 98

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
W. Thielemans "script editor extraordinaire" (Belgium)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Fall [DVD]
The Fall [DVD]
Dvd ~ Gillian Anderson
Price: 15.99

9 of 74 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The Fall - how low can you fall, indeed., 17 May 2013
This review is from: The Fall [DVD] (DVD)
Extremely boring, pretentious, badly acted series, with barely enough material for a two-parter. Gillian Anderson's character is ridiculous and her acting is truly awful, Jamie Doran has one expression throughout. That's supposed to be good acting??? There are subplots about police corruption which have nothing to do with the main storyline and just drag down the general torpid pace, there's no real ending (unfortunately series 2 is on the way)... Worst of the lot are the scenes between Anderson and Archie Panjabi (coroner), where both actresses seem to outdo each other in blandness (quite impressive to make the talented and charismatic Panjabi as dull as any walk-on extra) while somehow hinting at some girl-girl action.

Absolutely everyone involved in this should be ashamed. It rarely gets more disappointing than this.
Comment Comments (29) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 25, 2013 10:51 PM BST


Carte Blanche: A James Bond Novel (James Bond Novels)
Carte Blanche: A James Bond Novel (James Bond Novels)
by Jeffery Deaver
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 13.59

7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Too much Deaver, far too little Bond, 15 Jun 2011
Bond is back and rebooted, with this novel pretending all the previous ones never happened, 007 is a Gulf War veteran, M, Moneypenny, Mary Goodnight and Bill Tanner are all along for the ride (and treated as brand-spanking-new characters). Jeffrey Deaver is a very succesful thriller novelist, though American, and primarily known for writing (overly) clever serial killer thrillers. He might have been a good fit on paper, and for the first half of the novel it almost looks as if he's going to pull it off. Sure, Bond is far too bland and nice (in no way a predator, more like an honourable descendant of King Arthur's knights), holding off from seducing women and only killing if he really, really, really has to. But the villain (Severan Hydt) is suitably revolting, his Irish henchman seems capable enough and there's a lot of mystery built up about the Grand Scheme.
Unfortunately, everything goes pear-shaped as the novel progresses. The stakes are far too small, the action is too run-of-the-mill, and the big confrontation we're all waiting for never comes. Instead, there's a huge twist at the end concerning the villain, which makes no sense (except it reinforces the reprehensible political stance that anyone trying to improve the world must be a megalomaniacal evil nutcase). The problem is that these twists are typical of Deaver's other works, but they have no place in a Bond novel.
I pity the screenwriter who has to turn this into a movie...


Scriptwriting for the Screen (Media Skills)
Scriptwriting for the Screen (Media Skills)
by Charlie Moritz
Edition: Paperback
Price: 20.99

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great book from a great, non-dogmatic teacher, 11 Oct 2008
I had the pleasure of having Charlie Moritz teach a couple of workshops for my screenwriting students in the '90s, and they were all without a single exception extremely enthusiastic about his approach.
You won't find complicated structural models or paint-by-numbers approaches to writing here. Instead, you will get a lot of insights about writing, bringing characters to life, being truthful in your writing and learning to use techniques like subtext to bring added substance to your writing.
Very highly recommended, both for being an excellent textbook with a lot of practical exercises and for bringing a decidedly non-American slant to the screenwriting game, which will enrich the work of any screenwriter.


Severed
Severed
by Simon Kernick
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

2 of 29 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars okay thrillride but could have been so much better, 29 May 2008
This review is from: Severed (Mass Market Paperback)
Simon Kernick manages to dream up excellent starting points for his thrillers. Unfortunately, finishing them in a satisfactory way is much more difficult.
My main problem with the book, apart from the willing suspension of disbelief-issues, is that Dan Tyler seems to have something wrong with him. He's a soldier who has seen action in some of the worst parts of the world, but his emotional reactions are so detached (he tells us his misses his new lover Leah, but we never believe him, his emotional connection to his best friend seems to be no more intense than what he would feel for an old acquaintance), that I was waiting for the other shoe to drop and there to be some shocking revelation about Tyler's true identity or past. But no. There is an emotional component to his predicament, which is okay, but I kept feeling he should have been more of an unreliable narrator (like the main character in Kenrick's second novel).
The second major criticism concerns the character of Allanah, and especially the wrap-up. Once again we're led to expect deep and disturbing revelations, but they do not appear. And the final scene is a bit embarrassing, really - her behaviour in that is completely without any foundation in reality. She's far too much of a fantasy figure to be acceptable.
This isn't the worst book ever by a long shot (I've tried to read and given up on far, far worse) but it's not Kenrick's best and you feel him trying to struggle to make sense of it all. That's the problem with killer beginnings - they can leave a writer stranded with nowhere to go. To his credit, Simon Kenrick does come up with a somewhat acceptable resolution, but nevertheless you can't help but feel that this material could have led to a stronger, darker tale.


Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7) [Adult Edition]
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows (Book 7) [Adult Edition]
by J. K. Rowling
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 12.59

6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best definitely kept till last, 25 July 2007
I read the book in one day (whew!). More happens in this one than in the other six books combined. I was very disappointed by number six (both in the plot and in the lack of incident), but in the final book J.K. Rowling has literally fixed every problem I had with the previous novel. There's action, psychological torment and turmoil, heroism, friendship, betrayal and huge, huge spectacle - the film will be extremely expensive to make, that's for sure (and it'll be very hard to fit the story within a 3-hour frame as well). For once, a long-term series concludes in an eminently satisfactory fashion on just about every level. Bravo, Ms. Rowling!


The State Within : Complete BBC Series [2006] [DVD]
The State Within : Complete BBC Series [2006] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Jason Isaacs
Price: 6.69

55 of 60 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars superb intelligent conspiracy thriller, 6 Mar 2007
I watched this on TV and couldn't wait for the DVD. A really smart story, with great writing, superb acting (Jason Isaacs for Bond NOW!) and excellent cinematography. I was horrified to discover that some newspapers listed this series as one of the big (creative) flops of the year - they couldn't be more wrong.

If you like intelligent, exciting political thrillers which give you the idea they're revealing a lot about the way things REALLY are run, give this a chance. You won't be sorry.


The Horse With My Name
The Horse With My Name
by Bateman
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars very disappointing, 18 Aug 2003
This review is from: The Horse With My Name (Paperback)
Dan Starkey is back, but Colin Bateman doesn't come up a winner this time. Embroiling Starkey with the world of horse-racing, which is even worse than that of boxing, Starkey meets old acquaintances and makes new enemies - possibly the nastiest he's ever run into. But although the jokes are here, and the new love interest, and the suspense, the plot is really weak this time around. The death which gets Starkey involved in all this never gets explained except as a throwaway in the last line, we are never told just what happened to get all these gamblers and Chinese Triads so mad (except that they lost money), the finale is unexciting and unfortunately Dan Starkey's 'man of inaction' moniker is really deserved here. There's also some extremely nasty torture scenes (involving both Starkey and a woman) and (unlike in previous novels) this time there is absolutely no payback in any form (except arrest by the police). Finally, I'm starting to wonder whether Bateman still likes Dan Starkey, as he has never been this flawed, mendacious and unlikeable before. Divorcing Jack and Of Wee Sweetie Mice And Men remain the highlights of this series. Hopefully the next time will be of that level again.


The Horse With My Name
The Horse With My Name
by Bateman
Edition: Paperback

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars very disappointing, 18 Aug 2003
This review is from: The Horse With My Name (Paperback)
Dan Starkey is back, but Colin Bateman doesn't come up a winner this time. Embroiling Starkey with the world of horse-racing, which is even worse than that of boxing, Starkey meets old acquaintances and makes new enemies - possibly the nastiest he's ever run into. But although the jokes are here, and the new love interest, and the suspense, the plot is really weak this time around. The death which gets Starkey involved in all this never gets explained except as a throwaway in the last line, we are never told just what happened to get all these gamblers and Chinese Triads so mad (except that they lost money), the finale is unexciting and unfortunately Dan Starkey's 'man of inaction' moniker is really deserved here. There's also some extremely nasty torture scenes (involving both Starkey and a woman) and (unlike in previous novels) this time there is absolutely no payback in any form (except arrest by the police). Finally, I'm starting to wonder whether Bateman still likes Dan Starkey, as he has never been this flawed, mendacious and unlikeable before. Divorcing Jack and Of Wee Sweetie Mice And Men remain the highlights of this series. Hopefully the next time will be of that level again.


A Song of Ice and Fire (3) - A Storm of Swords
A Song of Ice and Fire (3) - A Storm of Swords
by George R. R. Martin
Edition: Hardcover

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing achievement, 27 Sep 2000
The best heroic fantasy series in the world keeps getting better. Though nearly 1,000 pages long, I had the feeling that it could easily have been 500 pages longer. Complaints about the Bran and Arya chapters never popped into my head. Yes, they move less decisively than some other plotlines but they all do progress significantly near the end and there's some very good character interaction to keep us engrossed. But of course the main focus of the book is on the political fallout of the war between the Starks and the Lannisters, and what a fallout it is. I defy anyone to predict more than 25 % of Martin's plot twists, and when he DOES go for the more predictable resolution it is because it is the RIGHT one. Robb Stark is finally on stage again (his lack of presence was the main drawback of Clash Of Kings as far as I was concerned). Jaime Lannister develops incredibly well as a character, and Tyrion remains as magnetic as ever (slight caveat : a few too many mentions of how people stare at him even more since he was scarred). The magical subplot increases in strength, Stannis is an absolutely fascinating creation - a decent, stern hero who is unlikable. The religion of R'Hllor doesn't seem to be what we thought it was - or is it? The way the battle between Light And Dark will be fought (probably) in the next three books shapes up to be very interesting and frightening. In fact, this is one of the aspects I like very much in the series : behind the scenes, a true Evil is at work, yet the ones who might be able to halt its advance are busily exterminating each other over what amount to petty squabbles, greed and jealousy. A wonderful mix of real-life medieval politics and heroic-fantasy themes. Of course, like everyone else here, my complaint is that it's going to take two years for GRRM to write the next novels and six years (at least) before the series is finished. And like many, I too fear that like Jordan and Goodkind he may lose his way and be lured to the Dark Side of Eternal Sequels Which Really Do Not Further The Main Plot Of The Series Anymore. But at this time his writing is so strong, his characterization so refreshing, and his plotting so audacious, intricate and satisfying that I have faith. Read it and be blown away.


Page: 1