Shop now Shop Clothing clo_fly_aw15_NA_shoes Shop All Shop All Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Paperwhite Shop now Shop Now Shop now
Profile for D. E. Rattray > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by D. E. Rattray
Top Reviewer Ranking: 6,544,121
Helpful Votes: 38

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
D. E. Rattray (UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Cypry the Carp
Cypry the Carp
by Peter Mohan
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Great!, 28 July 2007
This review is from: Cypry the Carp (Paperback)
This is a beautiful little book that I tried to get hold of thirty years ago but couldn't. I finally read it this weekend and was extremely impressed. I knew it was original and a great idea but didn't expect it to be so well written. On the one hand it teaches the reader about the life and mind of a fish, but on the other it shows glimpses of why human beings are so drawn to it and its environment. The plot is about cyry, its conception, birth, growth, first two captures, and a boy/man Andy who dreams of catching it. Also detailed are poachers and other anglers including a couple of strange little anecdotal ones; one about an angler who wants fame to the extent that he'll cheat and one whose ambitions for cypry has him poaching at night. I can't help but wonder at Peter Mohans experiences/knowledge. But a gorgeous little book, beautifully written and remarkably clever with an apropriate ending. I prefer the original cover.


The Velvet Rooms
The Velvet Rooms
by Sam North
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars absorbing, 18 Jun. 2007
This review is from: The Velvet Rooms (Paperback)
After an annoying start, where I had to get used to the chatroom-speak, this turned out really well. I very nearly gave up on it at first as I found the chatroom stuff annoying and tedious. But I persevered and was drawn into this tale of a group of people who live in different countries and seem to know each other through cyberspace - a chatroom website callet The Velvet Rooms. Two main friends (Fatarmedwife and Call-Girl) want to meet up. But before they do, they are joined by a newcomer (thruster) who is a sex/dom who has a bit of fetishist dom sex with (Call-Girl). But Call-girl plays a trick on Thruster and humiliates him. Thruster is a nutter who wants revenge...I won't spoil any more of the plot. It is well written although there are slow parts (which you have to have in most thrillers) mostly involving Fatarmedwife. But it is rivetting near the end which is extremely subtly written, and you are constantly surprised at the author giving you clues to things and showing you without telling you. I really appreciated that, it was so refreshing and exciting to read. Very well done and quite unlike those wordy thrillers that need to tell you everything in case you're an idiot. The end is quite moving also. If I could rate this book in stages it would have 2 stars for the first quarter, progressing to 5 for the end. The end makes it 5 overall. Please read.


Urban Grimshaw and The Shed Crew
Urban Grimshaw and The Shed Crew
by Bernard Hare
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not quite a new Kes, 13 Jun. 2007
This is about an ex-social worker who becomes embroiled in the lives of juvenile delinquents to the extent where he practically becomes a senile delinquent himself. The narrator's nickname is Chop (Bernard Hare) and he is rather proud of this involvement and proud to become a member of The Shed Crew (young Urban Grimshaw's gang). On the front cover of the book it says "the shocking story of hellbound children and one unlikely saviour" but I'm afraid that in this, Bernard Hare immodestly overshoots a tad with the 'unlikely saviour'. I found the book and the attitudes behind it rather disappointing. The novelty of drug-taking, car stealing, violent little brats is great at first but wears off after a few chapters. Chop's pride in them and their crimes really grates after a while. With some arguments he's very inconsistent: Complaining about lack of schooling, care etc. and then proudly chronicling the kids hopping off school and saying 'up yours' to the care when the 'Babylonians' offer it. At one point when a kid 'torches' a phonebox and then his own mum's flat, there is very little criticism, instead an almost perverse fatherly pride. But if you're a decent, normal person living on this street it will harm your psyche. Not Chop's though as he's in amongst it and safe in his familiarity with these yobs. Instead Chop complains about these estates as if they breed all this. But would you want them on your street? Would they change? You get the feeling from Hare that if you're not a delinquent then it's because you've had a golden childhood with loving parents etc. All these kids want is to feel that someone cares, we are told. And Bernard Hare does, especially for Urban Grimshaw. But ultimately this book made me care less about them all, not more. It left me feeling that unless you can assign one social worker for a child, a fulltime one at that (hopefully one that doesn't do drugs with them or steal with them, protect them from the police etc.), then it's just too late to help them. That's just the impression I've been given from the book. One full time social worker per child is financially impractical- not from my taxes you don't mate! Life's unfair to everyone, not just the Shed Crew. I much preferred and would recommend A Kestrel for a Knave which actually showed the reader Billy Casper's background and lost potential rather than merely told you. Also, it lacked the self congratulatory narrator and intruding political rantings.


The Ex-boyfriend's Handbook
The Ex-boyfriend's Handbook
by Matt Dunn
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 9 Mar. 2007
This was an excellent book that is quite funny and always keeps your attention. Edward has just been partially dumped by his long-time girlfriend- Jane. She's given him three weeks to think about things and, under the tutorship of his best mate Dan, loses weight, veneers his teeth, gets a personal trainer etc. During his long relationship with Jane he's let himself go. During his three months the author delves into reasons and mostly concerns himself with getting in shape to pull. There are the nice people, like bargirl Wendy and Edward, who want to be honest and respectful, and the not-so-nice Dans. How looks orientated are women? Actions speak louder than words and the author does show that looks are SO important to women (short term, for pulling) but does also criticize poor morals and principals in the form of over-the-top Dan. You get the impression that the author and Edward would like the world to be as politically correct as possible but, when push comes to shove, women don't respect and want these needy and nice men, especially if they don't have the looks or the mini-coopers. Mat Dunn does an excellent job of showing how delluded women and nice men are about their own wants. You can talk about looks and money not being important but when you find yourself 'out there' you, like Edward, will have to move the goalposts to win. There's loads of laugh-out-loud bits in the book, cracking one liners, and slowly but surely, the author wins you round to Dans way of thinking by the end. I will be pushing this book onto my friends.


Woman Walks into a Bar (Quick Read)
Woman Walks into a Bar (Quick Read)
by Rowan Coleman
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly Good, 2 Jun. 2006
I say surprisingly because I've read so many crappy chicklit type books recently. This still has the chicklit mainstay- two-dimensional men: They're either tough/geeky or goodlooking/ugly or nice/nasty etc. But the main character, though passive, is deep and aspects of her past that have influenced her current personality are powerfully thought out and written which carried me through this fluent and enjoyable read. It was refreshing to find a challenging note in this flimsilly packaged book. Perhaps the main character was good enough, or real enough, to make the men feel more stereotyped. But the thread of this character was enough for me to tolerate the chicklit stuff and the extremely annoying daughter written so lovingly by someone with obvious maternal instincts.It's a tough old world out there if your a woman looking for Mr Right and the book does touch on (slightly) how a woman who's passive and backward is perhaps more vulnerable to the dark side of men-types. But a good, one-sitting read that I'd recommend.


Explorers of the New Century
Explorers of the New Century
by Magnus Mills
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £10.99

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Wierd and wonderful, 19 Sept. 2005
I happilly discovered Restraint of Beasts a few months ago and have hungrilly devoured all of Magnus Mlls books since. He seems totally restraint free when it comes to imagination and originality. All his books have certain things in common- they are all compulsive reads, filled with dry/black humour and they all put you in a literary comfort zone for certain periods only to keep surprising you and kicking you out of that zone regularly.
Two teams from different countries are trying to reach the 'Agreed Furthest Point' from civilization. At the start of the book we don't know why (it becomes clear later) but we can see that the two teams become competitive and want to reach the destination first. Both teams are made up entirely of men (Yes, this is a Mills book) and each team have a few mules with them. It seems that one team is extremely proffessional and the other (the British) are amateurs.
Explorers of the New Century is set in an alternative world that seems normal at first but as the book continues little things jump out at you and have you thinking 'what's going on here?'. You will wonder if these are aliens and they've been given British names to fool you. You will wonder what the mules signify and what the moral lesson is. You will think of slavery, of racism, of rank and purpose. What's frustrating about writing a review is that there's no easy answers to any of this. It's like a big puzzle and I would be lying if I claimed to know the answers at the end. But I'd say this is Mills' best book since All Quiet on the Orient Express. Read, enjoy, and think.


Getting Personal
Getting Personal
by Chrissie Manby
Edition: Paperback

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Better than most, 3 April 2005
This review is from: Getting Personal (Paperback)
I read this two years ago and am now compelled to write a review due to all the dross I've been reading lately. There seems to be a surplus of crappy books about thirty something people where the women are all clever and compassionate and the men are all stupid and selfish etc. When I read this book I enjoyed it so much I went on a spree of reading this type of thing to find that the other books didn't live up to this one. The women characters are all wonderful and although the male characters seem a little two dimensional (hence four stars instead of five) it's still a very enjoyable and absorbing book. If you want to read modern fiction about modern people and how they think and behave then you could do worse (a lot worse in my recent experience) than pick this one. It's a little jewel amongst all the dross on the shelves. I think I'll have to track down a couple more of Chris Manby's books.


Page: 1