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Jeremy Miles "Jeremy Miles" (Los Angeles)
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Instructions For Living Someone Else's Life
Instructions For Living Someone Else's Life
by Mil Millington
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best since Things My Girlfriend and I ..., 17 July 2008
Like all Mil Millington's books, this is a book about relationships and friendships, embedded within a story about something different. This story, as you will have read from the blurb, is about someone who gets transported forwards in time to himself in the future, but it's not about a happy jolly `Back to the Future' nuclear family that you might imagine. Along the way there are some very funny jokes, and some wry observations about how a person from the eighties might see the noughties. On being told that music was crap now, the hero says that it wasn't so great back then either - the best was the pet shop boys. He's told that the Pet Shop Boys are now considered to be classic.
I'd say that this was Mil Millington's best book since TMGAIHAA. There are hints of that book in this one, the relationship of the hero to his partner is somewhat similar, but the similarities are sufficiently slight that this adds to, rather than detracts from the book.
When I was half way through I thought I would be disappointed at the length of the book - I want a good book to go on forever, so I can enjoy it for longer, but the length of the book works nicely - the story comes around to a conclusion and it finishes at just the right time.


Love and Other Near Death Experiences
Love and Other Near Death Experiences
by Mil Millington
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Right riveting read, 25 Jun 2006
Mil Millington's third book is a bit of a departure. It's not a rip roaringly laugh out loud hilarious as the first two, although it's still pretty funny. (And funnier than most books.) There's more of a plot than the first two, and the characters seem to be a bit more developed.

The book starts with the same sort of domestic bliss (ish) that TMGAIHAA and ACC started with, but rapidly shoots off in a different direction, turning into an adventure road book.

Whilst Rob, the narrator and hero, sort of fumbles along (a little like the standard Millington hero), the acerbic and intelligent clinically depressed English teacher Elizabeth has all the best lines.

One of the better acknowledgement sections too.


Paddling to Jerusalem: An Aquatic Tour of Our Small Country
Paddling to Jerusalem: An Aquatic Tour of Our Small Country
by David Aaronovitch
Edition: Paperback

0 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable ramble, 29 Mar 2005
In contrast with some of the other reviewers, I rather liked this book.
The author tells us of the trials and tribulations of his journey - along the way he tells us of the people he meets, the things he sees, and extra historical facts. In addition, there are some quite personal thoughts about his family background - his parents and grandparents.
The book isn't fast paced - the bloke's in a canoe, after all, but sometimes it does linger a bit too long. He has what some might see as an unhealthy interest in people that have died on the rivers and canals - either shortly before he arrived, or shortly after he left.


The Lawn Expert
The Lawn Expert
by Dr D G Hessayon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

11 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, but not for me, 9 April 2002
This review is from: The Lawn Expert (Paperback)
This book doesn't really take the approach that I was interested in, in lawn management. The author is very enthusiastic about a perfect lawn at all costs. Their attitude towards worms is curious - they are a BAD THING and "unfortunately, worm killer is no longer available". The solution to most problems is the addition of chemicals, and then some more chemicals.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 1, 2012 1:51 PM GMT


An Introduction to Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling: Concepts, Issues, and Application, Second Edition (Quantitative Methodology Series)
An Introduction to Latent Variable Growth Curve Modeling: Concepts, Issues, and Application, Second Edition (Quantitative Methodology Series)
by Terry E. Duncan
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Introduces LGM, assumes little prior knowledge, 23 Oct 2001
This book is an excellent introduction to latent growth modelling (LGM). It starts off by showing that repeated measures ANOVA is a special case of LGM, and then moves into more advanced topics. You can't read this book knowing nothing about statistics, but if you have a small amount of familiarity with structural equation models, or are willing to learn, you will be OK.
The examples are mainly carried out using EQS, but are also supplemented with AMOS and LISREL.


The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statisticians Revolutionized Science in the 20th Century
The Lady Tasting Tea: How Statisticians Revolutionized Science in the 20th Century
by David Salsburg
Edition: Hardcover

15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The stories about the people behind the numbers, 26 Sep 2001
This is an excellent book, which tells the stories and anecdotes behind the statistics. The tales of the long acrimony between Pearson and Fisher is explained (and how this extended to Neyman). The story of the tea tasting episode (form which the title is taken) is revealed. The author wasn't there, but he did speak to someone who was there.
If you are interested in statistical analysis, and why we do the analysis that we do, this is a fantastic book.
My one problem with the book (and it's a small one) is that the book does not give any mathematics at all. This is to avoid putting off the mathematically timid, but if you aren't interested, and don't know at least a little about, statistics, why would the book interest you?


Statistics As Principled Argument
Statistics As Principled Argument
by Robert P. Abelson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £25.69

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How to think statistically, 5 Sep 2001
This is an excellent book which is not so much about statistics, but about how to "think statistically". It assumes some knowledge of statistics, although not very much (Abelson is a psychologist and statistician, and an undergraduate psychologist would be able to read this book).
It gives excellent examples of ways to think about statistics, and findings in statistics. Why, for example, do orchestra conductors live longer than other people? Is it because of the activity that improves their circulation? Or is it because you have to manage to reach a certain age, before you can become an orchestra conductor - and people who died before that age cannot contribute to the statistics on conductors?
Social psychologists will be surprised to find out that the original cognitive dissonance study Ffestinger and Carlsmith, 1959, did not analyse the data appropriately, and if they had, would not have achieved a significant result.


Kill as Few Patients as Possible: And Fifty-six Other Essays on How to Be the World's Best Doctor
Kill as Few Patients as Possible: And Fifty-six Other Essays on How to Be the World's Best Doctor
by Oscar London
Edition: Paperback

33 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not funny if you are not American, 30 July 2001
This book has a lot of potential to be funny. But it wasn't, at least not to me. Maybe that is because I am not a doctor, working in private practice in a reasonably affluent part of the US. And I am not familiar with doctors who are working in private practice in a reasonably affluent part of the US. Or maybe it's just me. The book is madeup of 57 short essays, containing humourous advice, aimed at doctors. However, the stories are about filling in insurance forms, playing golf, how your receptionist should behave, not joining a partnership. And most of them mean nothing to me.


Measurement, Design, and Analysis: An Integrated Approach
Measurement, Design, and Analysis: An Integrated Approach
by Elazar J. Pedhazur
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £76.35

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Covers everything you need to know., 8 Jun 2001
I have to disagree with the previous reviewer. I think that this is a great book. Yes, OK the authors dispense their wrath over all and sundry, but hey! Sometimes a bit of wrath needs dispensing. Statistics and methods in psychology are often poorly written about, frequently poorly taught, and hence often carried out, so the authors are just trying to make that point.
This book integrates three stages of carrying out research (as the title says, measurement, design and analysis) and covers them all extremely comprehensively.


Psion Pen Pack 3 Pens for Revo
Psion Pen Pack 3 Pens for Revo

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars They aren't cheap, but when you need one ..., 22 May 2001
The new styli are extraordinarily expensive for what they are - three plastic sticks. Unfortunately, they are three plastic sticks that are just the right shape, so when you need 'em, you need 'em.


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