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Jagreen Lern (London, England)

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Bad Men: On Their Way To Do Bad Things
Bad Men: On Their Way To Do Bad Things
Price: £4.62

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 'must have' for the b-side alone, 30 Dec. 2013
'Survival Instinct' is a masterpiece. Amandine Ferrari's voice is amazing on this track, which begins with an ethereal brooding then builds to an intense crescendo then suddenly gone, as if it was never there in the first place. An essential purchase for the Eden House fan.
'Bad Men' is a bit of a departure from the norm - glammed up guitars with attitude. Actually my least favourite track on the Half Life album but still good and suits Monica Richards' edgy vocals.


LP: Padded Knee Guard (Pair) LP608 - Medium
LP: Padded Knee Guard (Pair) LP608 - Medium

5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended for Aikido and Judo-ka with dodgy knees, 14 Nov. 2013
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These are thin enough to fit under Judo trousers and padded enough for kneeling techniques. I have had a pair for a year and with regular wear during Aikido and Judo they have retained their shape and have not shrunk in the wash. Having injured the tendon over my knee cap, these offered the necessary protection to avoid any further aggravation.


Orbus (Spatterjay 3)
Orbus (Spatterjay 3)
by Neal Asher
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Fizzled out, 21 Jun. 2012
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This review is from: Orbus (Spatterjay 3) (Paperback)
Started off great, in Neal Asher's trademark high octane (& slightly bonkers) style. But perhaps because Orbus is set in space rather than on the imaginatively dangerous planet of Spatterjay, and perhaps due to the distinctly Prador-centric story, the second half felt too long and became rather cartoon-ish to me. The presence of the Jain lacked the usual malevolence and as the plot unfolded my interest waned. The story became simply one battle followed by another and another and another. Seemed like this may have been a back story/scene setter for a Polity vs Fourth Kingdom showdown in Spatterjay book 4. Hopefully that will be a return to form.


Usagi Yojimbo: Book 1 (Usagi Yojimbo (Fantagraphics Books))
Usagi Yojimbo: Book 1 (Usagi Yojimbo (Fantagraphics Books))
by Stan Sakai
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Recommended for fans of Kurosawa & Japanese folk tales, 10 July 2010
Usagi Yojimbo is a mix of Kurosawa, Lone Wolf & Cub (Lone Goat & Kid), Zatoichi (Zatoino - the pig) and Japanese folk tales, all told through anthropomorphic characters. The author, Stan Sakai is Japanese but lives in America, and so his style is accessible for Westerners. The hero (literally "Rabbit Bodyguard") is a masterless samurai and is influenced by Miyamoto Musashi the greatest ever swordsman from 17th century Japan.
This is part one of my favourite ever comic series. I'm a practitioner of the martial arts and a fan of the culture of old Japan. As a kid I used to avidly draw my own anthropomorphic creatures all trying to kill each other on a mass battlefield (er, well it seemed normal then), and so as soon as I discovered Usagi Yojimbo I felt like its style and content was right up my street.
I would say that to read Usagi Yojimbo is to be drawn into a movie-like experience. I don't claim to be a comic/graphic novel/Manga aficionado, but I've never found another to match. Perhaps Jeff Smith's "Bone" is the only one I felt was close to Usagi's style, drama, wit, and storytelling. In my opinion the reading of each volume of Usagi Yojimbo is a treasured experience.


The Way of Wyrd: Tales of an Anglo-Saxon Sorcerer
The Way of Wyrd: Tales of an Anglo-Saxon Sorcerer
by Brian Bates
Edition: Paperback

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Atmospheric and enlightening, 24 Jun. 2008
From a collection of manuscripts in the British museum, the author has created a story in an attempt to shed light on the spiritual outlook from the dark ages. I enjoyed discovering close parrallels with the views of an Anglo-Saxon shaman and with those known from oriental philosophies. The Christian scribe acts as the voice of the reader, struggling to marry his religious views with the healing power of the shaman, before becoming his apprentice. This is not pro-pagan nor anti-Christian, but clearly our Christian hero had eaten a few things that if tried today are likely to show up in a modern drugs test. It's an enjoyable, easy read that I found interesting.


Last Argument Of Kings: The First Law: Book Three: Book Three of the First Law (GollanczF.)
Last Argument Of Kings: The First Law: Book Three: Book Three of the First Law (GollanczF.)
by Joe Abercrombie
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantasy for adults with a dark sense of humour, 24 Jun. 2008
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A story of kings, mages, warriors and torturers, enough to satisfy the most epic of escapist longings. But with their strengths and flaws so keenly written, these are characters that are developed, believable, unpredictable and hilarious.
I was fantasy fan from childhood thanks to Michael Moorcock, but for a time thought the whole genre tainted by too many post Tolkien-esque clichees. However my Joe Abercrombie discovery occurred almost by accident in a bookshop I saw book 2, read the first quote, "We should forgive our enemies, but not before they are hanged," and I thought... COOL! Joe Abercrombie has given the genre a trilogy that is fun, wicked, and a hell of a good story. I can't remember reading anything better. I'm just sorry it had to end.


The Line War (Ian Cormac)
The Line War (Ian Cormac)
by Neal Asher
Edition: Hardcover

8 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good pager turner but lacks the oomph factor of his other books., 24 Jun. 2008
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If you are reading a review for this book, chances are you're a Neal Asher fan already. This is the 5th and supposedly final installment of the Ian Cormac series, so no persuasion to read it is needed. If not yet a fan, then a description of his writing for me is akin to a magic eye picture, in that his books are always interesting to start but not always very clear what they're all about. Then, suddenly concepts and stories, the brain did not think previously comprehensible, are thrust in to view. This is true of Line War but when it all becomes clear this book just slightly lacks that oomph factor of the other books. It pains me to give only 3 stars to an author of stratospheric dimensions, but, despite being a good page turner, for me Asher has not added anything extra to what has gone before. The Cormac books are all a bit bleaker and less humourous than the others, but even knowing this I did not root for the characters quite as much as I wanted. Gimme Sniper the War Drone over Knobbler any day. Brass Man was the zenith of the series in my opinion. For the uninitiated, read The Skinner and Voyage of the Sable Keech. They're the best sci-fi books I've ever read.
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