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PAKITE PAT-556 5.8GHz Digital STB Wireless Sharing IR Remote Extender AV Transmitter Receiver with 2 group AV input - 300M
PAKITE PAT-556 5.8GHz Digital STB Wireless Sharing IR Remote Extender AV Transmitter Receiver with 2 group AV input - 300M
Offered by G.King
Price: £53.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The audio and video are both better than the previous TV sender I had so it ..., 16 Jan. 2016
The audio and video are both better than the previous TV sender I had so it gets a couple of stars for that. But:

- I'm pretty sure this does not send the signal digitally. Digital signals are all or nothing whereas the audio has a slight hiss that I feel is very analogue.
- The Infrared transmitter is laughably poor. I had to literally tape the IR transmitter to my sky box's IR receiver and it now gets about 90% of button presses. Anything else it missed almost everything . This is a big negative and where most of the lost stars are.
- The manual is clearly very poorly translated (into English).

So in conclusion; Video: perfect, Audio: quite good, low hiss that's not noticeable except over dead silent tv (basically when you pause it). IR; really really terrible.

Its worth noting that is transmission from the room directly above; total distance 3 meters through 1 wall.


Game Physics Engine Development: How to Build a Robust Commercial-Grade Physics Engine for your Game
Game Physics Engine Development: How to Build a Robust Commercial-Grade Physics Engine for your Game
by Ian Millington
Edition: Paperback
Price: £34.16

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Really excellent introductory/intermediate book, 13 Jun. 2013
I got this book recently as a gift (I know I'm a geek) and found it not only to be useful but also (remarkably) quite an interesting read that I read from cover to cover without feeling "bogged down" in it. This book starts from very little assumed knowledge (for example vectors are explained) but quickly builds up to some quite advanced concepts. I have a degree in physics but I think I would classify that as useful rather than essential for this book to be useful to you. A decent background in programming is probably essential but not necessarily C++ (the books language of choice)

Text books can in general be split into two groups, those that are mathematically rigorous to the expense of clarity and those that are actually useful. This book definitely falls into latter category; and is better for it.

I am a java programmer with no experience of C++ however the book (which is C++ focused) remained very useful with the supplied code being supplemental to the text section rather than being essential. However, the code that I did read was clear with expressive variable names and clear logic.

Other reviewers have commented that the collision detection chapter is weak and I have to agree; if that is your main difficulty then this book may not be for you. However collision detection is quite self-contained; separated out from the rest of a physics engine so you can plug in whatever collision detection you like. For me this was fine as in my previous "less than satisfactory" attempts at physics engines the collision detection was the only part that was good and I just slotted in the old collision detection into the new engine. I would also warn (if you don't read the book from cover to cover) that the author has used operator overloading; be aware that % has been used for the cross product, not the more usual modulus operator.

Very little is glossed over in this book; for example a whole chapter (and several separate sections) are dedicated to stability (i.e. sorting the problems of vibrations at rest that plague physics engines). Not to mention that a complete engine written based on the concepts of this book is linked to on the internet so if anything is ever unclear (not that it really is) you can go and look at the complete source code to see exactly how it was done).

In conclusion; I have written 3 physics engines, the first let things fall through each other occasionally, the second sort of worked but everything vibrated at rest and behaved strangely sometimes, the third, written with this books help, just works. I can thoroughly recommend this book


Robust Control Design with MATLAB® (Advanced Textbooks in Control and Signal Processing)
Robust Control Design with MATLAB® (Advanced Textbooks in Control and Signal Processing)
by D.-W. Gu
Edition: Paperback

1.0 out of 5 stars Large blocks of matlab code without explanation, 18 April 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book needs some improvement. My main criticism would be that it has blocks of matlab code and explains what the block as a whole does. But does not explain at all what each line does. Add to that completely unhelpful variable names (like olp_ic, nuWp, Wpi_g) and you have to ask if they've deliberately obfuscated the code?

Given we're trying to learn this that makes the whole thing basically useless.


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