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Keith Plant "Keith." (Stony Stratford.)

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9012 Live [2006] [DVD]
9012 Live [2006] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Yes
Offered by inandout-distribution
Price: £28.91

5.0 out of 5 stars Yes reinvented for the 80s!, 27 July 2015
This review is from: 9012 Live [2006] [DVD] (DVD)
I remember seeing Yes on this tour, and it was quite an event. I had seen them seven years earlier and although the line-up had changed and there had been a big change of style in the music with the album '90125' (which is reflected very much in the choice of what's included musically) this still felt very much like a Yes concert. The group seem very much re-energised by the inclusion of Trevor Rabin on guitar and as such this is reflected in a greater stage presence than the group had projected before. Some older songs are represented by 'Your move / 'I've seen all good people' and 'Starship Trooper' but the main emphasis is on new material. Some so called Yes purists can be a bit sniffy about this line-up, but the way they rip into 'Starship Trooper' elevates the track to a new level and is 'pure Yes' (I remember thinking that when I saw it live and it certainly comes across on the DVD). The DVD plays in two formats, one with various 50s movie footage interspersed with the concert footage and the other just the plain concert. This is certainly worth getting as it documents a very interesting phase for Yes as a group.


In The Pleasure Groove: Love, Death and Duran Duran
In The Pleasure Groove: Love, Death and Duran Duran
by John Taylor
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

4.0 out of 5 stars The story of a reformed wild boy!, 27 July 2015
This made a very interesting change from reading theological books, but that's what happens when Pastors go on holiday! Duran Duran being one of my favourite groups and myself being a bass player, I was given this for Christmas a year back. One of the most interesting parts of the book is about the formation of the band and the development of the musical style. Duran Duran did create a fusion of musical styles which was very guitar led and therefore quite unusual in the synthpop of the early 80's and John gives a fair amount of information on how this came about (particularly the style of his bass playing). John's struggle with drugs and drink (particularly cocaine) seems to be fairly honestly dealt with and this is a strength of the book. Another refreshing aspect is that John doesn't apportion blame to other people for failed relationships (even where his disastrous first marriage is concerned) and the music business in general, something which in the topsy-turvy world of being a rock musician is quite common. In the end you do want a bit more detail here and there as some aspects of his life in the band are very quickly dealt with minimum detail (an example of this would be Andy Taylor's second departure from the band). But in the end this is not a group biography but John's. But aside from that one does get the impression that John has learnt something from his experiences even if it is just in the vein of 'youth being wasted on the young' as one definitely gets the impression of fame and wealth happening all too quickly for him to handle as a young man! Rather interestingly, given the resentment of his Catholic background, there are times when he cries out to God in the midst of his difficulties. The shame is because of the emphasis on unquestioning faith he grew up with (after all the book of Psalms in the Bible is full of people asking questions of God and his actions), he has come to a rather confused picture of God rather than the one that can really provide salvation through the work of Christ! Still it's never too late!


Psalms Volume 2 (Welwyn Commentary)
Psalms Volume 2 (Welwyn Commentary)
by Philip Eveson
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A skilled exposition of the text!, 17 July 2015
I have just started reading through this as I'm doing quite a bit of work on the Psalms on and off at the moment. Whereas most commentaries on the Psalms (even two-volume ones) suffer from not enough commentary on the text due to the vast nature of the book, this one does seem to devote enough space to comment on each Psalm. As commentaries go the Welwyn series are not particularly technical (look elsewhere if you want to go into detail on translation of the Hebrew text) so Eveson concentrates mainly on opening up the text (translation being dealt with only if there is a real need, and then very simply and clearly) and this is a good thing as he is a very gifted Old Testament Bible teacher! The Psalms I have read so far are covered very adequately and Eveson is very good at bringing in impressions of the material from other scriptures. This actually gives the commentary of a broader approach as to how Psalms compliments and fits in with other Scripture. The other thing which is particularly good is that there is no forcing Christ into the scripture here. Jesus commented that he is found in all the scriptures (John 5:39 and 46) and this is definitely very true! But sometimes it is as an impression rather than a direct reference and Eveson is extremely skilled at how each part of a Psalm should be understood in its self, but also particularly in this context. So this is definitely a very good commentary for sermon preparation. But it would be equally good for personal Bible study and leading Bible studies. All this and at a good price to!


Duran Duran (The Wedding Album)
Duran Duran (The Wedding Album)
Price: £4.76

5.0 out of 5 stars Proof that there was more to them than meets the eye!, 16 July 2015
1993 was a good year for Duran Duran as they bounced back with this album after what some consider a year or two in the musical doldrums. This is an album where they took plenty of musical chances which is very apparent from the heavy guitar-soaked opening track 'Too much information' which makes it clear that we are to expect an innovative album. The musical variations continue with such diverse tracks as 'Love voodoo', 'Breath after breath' and 'None of the above' providing a real mixe of styles! With Warren now very much part of the group this accounts for much of the musical breadth of this album, the acoustic flavourings of 'Breath after breath' being an example. But let's not forget that this album also includes two of the best singles that Duran Duran ever released in the beautiful 'Ordinary world and the incredibly innovative 'Come undone'! Many had written off Duran Duran at this point, but this album was continuing testament that people had overlooked their talent and just pigeonhole them as a pretty boy pop band! After this it all got a bit complicated and they were to languish in the musical doldrums again for a bit. But you can't keep a good band down and they were to bounce back again!


Apostasy, Destruction & Hope - 2 Kings (Welwyn commentaries): 2 Kings Simply Explained
Apostasy, Destruction & Hope - 2 Kings (Welwyn commentaries): 2 Kings Simply Explained
by Roger Ellsworth
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A very competent commentary., 16 July 2015
As is usual with the Welywn commentaries this is a very accessible read as the text is plain and straightforward. However there is much to enjoy and be gained if you want to understand the book of 2 Kings as this succeeds in opening it up. I've just started preaching through 2 Kings focusing on the ministry of Elisha after finishing a sermon series focusing on the ministry of Elijah and as such have found this commentary extremely helpful. There's not much technical detail, your have to look at other commentaries if you want to understand the intricacies of the translation from the Hebrew text. But if you use this with other commentaries it will prove to be extremely helpful. Ideal for sermon preparation, leading Bible studies or just personal Bible study, this is a very good commentary to start with if you want to understand the text of the passage as it is an easy read and gives you a very good overview of the passage as well as some good insights. All this and reasonably priced as well!


Book of Acts (New International Commentary on the New Testament)
Book of Acts (New International Commentary on the New Testament)
by Frederick Bruce
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £27.19

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of the best commentaries on Acts., 13 July 2015
This is definitely one of the best commentaries I've got on the book of Acts as it is certainly up to Bruce's usual high standard. The text is well covered and there is enough in the footnotes to cover any technical details such as translation from the Greek if the need should arise. As commentaries of this standard go this is pretty a easy read and therefore is good for personal Bible study, leading Bible studies or preaching on the text. The narrative of Acts often seems to cause problems for some commentators with its mixture of historical narrative and teaching and although there are many good commentaries about, it is quite hard to find exceptional ones. This one certainly seems to meet the need when it comes to significant detail and is probably worth another half star if I could give it that. A bit expensive if buying new but there do seem to be some good second-hand buys around on Amazon so worth looking around and waiting for a good price!


Fish Out Of Water [SHM-CD]
Fish Out Of Water [SHM-CD]

5.0 out of 5 stars A testimony to a master musician!, 11 July 2015
I remember first getting this back just after it had come out and being slightly disappointed by it. True there was some brilliant bass work on it but I was expecting more breath-taking bass runs than were on show here. How naÔve I was as for Chris, master musician that he was, it was always about the music and not how fast he could play or how flashy he could be. What we have here is an incredibly well crafted album and from the moment the pipe organ starts up on 'Hold out your hand' you realise there's going to be nothing run-of-the-mill about this album. There's not a wasted note here and it's good to see Bill Bruford teaming up again with Chris and giving a crisp punchy sound to the rhythm section. Patrick Moraz also puts in an appearance with some scintillating organ work. But Chris is the star of the show here with his unique bass playing to the fore but never over shadowing the rest of the music. Rather interestingly, Chris ops for no lead guitar work just some electric 12 string which gives the music a distinctive sound. All the songs are good, with the opening track 'Hold out your hand' and 'You by my side' 'Silently falling' and 'Lucky seven' being distinctively different from what you might expect him to come up with. The longer tracks, 'Silently falling and 'Safe', hold the attention very well with 'Safe' making an epic closing track. The use of strings also gives the music a distinctive sound and seems to work really well with none of the drawbacks that are found on 'Time and word' when strings were used. I believe that 'Parallels' was left over from this album and it would have been interesting to see what treatment it would have had if included (still it proved to be a classic 'Yes' song in the end) All in all, Chris maybe gone but he is not forgotten and this, his only solo work (apart from 'Swiss Choir' which is a collection of Christmas Carols), stands as a fine testimony to him not so much as a great bass player (which he undoubtedly was) but a great musician!


Notorious
Notorious
Price: £5.02

5.0 out of 5 stars No signs of a group in crisis!, 3 July 2015
This review is from: Notorious (Audio CD)
Despite the loss of two members, one before the recording had even started the other one midway through it, Duran Duran do not come across on this album as a group in crisis. But there are two reasons for this. Firstly, the group had come up with their strongest material yet and, secondly, there was a strong guiding hand production wise from Nile Rodgers. Both he and the remaining three band members seem to be on the same page where the material and production are concerned. Although this is the album where the group transformed from being a singles band into an album band, in that the other album material is as strong and in many cases stronger than some of the singles, the singles that were released from this album are still incredibly strong, 'Skin trade' being one of the best Duran Duran singles ever released and Notorious not far behind! But it is with the other tracks were we see the group spreading its wings musically with songs like 'American science', 'Hold me', 'Vertigo' and 'Proposition' proving that the band had come of age musically. With Andy Taylor leaving halfway through the proceedings, guitar duties are shared out between him, Nile Rodgers and, later to become group member, Warren Cuccurullo. However, even if, as I have read, the first guitar solo in 'American science is by Andy and the second by Warren (or is it the other way round?) there is a strong sense of direction on this album in still being very guitar orientated but pursuing a much more funk rock orientated direction musically and it really pays off as this was their strongest album to this point! They may have been down to 3 members but this and the next album, 'Big thing' (where despite not yet being a group member Warren's influence in the guitar department is clear for all to hear) proved Duran Duran were not just a bunch of pretty boys but had much to offer musically!


Be Distinct: Standing Firmly Against the World's Tides: OT Commentary: 2 Kings & 2 Chronicles
Be Distinct: Standing Firmly Against the World's Tides: OT Commentary: 2 Kings & 2 Chronicles
by Warren W. Wiersbe
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.96

5.0 out of 5 stars Good straightforward and clear teaching!, 1 July 2015
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As is often the case Warren Wiersbe gets right to the centre of the argument much quicker than many supposedly more scholarly commentaries and often with a greater economy of pages and clarity. Some commentaries take page after page of painful reading where Wiersbe deals with the same subject very thoroughly in just a page or two. I've just started preaching through 2 Kings and I am finding this, alongside the incomparable Dale Ralph Davis's commentary, to be far the most helpful and to the point when it comes to understanding the passage. The historical books of the Bible can often be difficult when it comes to application as they tell it as it is with all the messy details you'd expect from imperfect people. But that is dealt with well here by not getting stuck on small details (although as a commentary this is not devoid of detail) but giving the big picture and drawing helpful application from that. As is always the case with the Wiersbe's 'Be' series this is light on the technicalities of the text. So you want to get into the intricacies of the Hebrew translation look elsewhere. But what you do get is a straightforward and helpful explanation of the text and a useful amount of helpful application. Useful for preaching, leading Bible studies or personal Bible study as it is very readable and clear.


From Glory to Ruin (Welwyn Commentaries)
From Glory to Ruin (Welwyn Commentaries)
by Roger Ellsworth
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.95

4.0 out of 5 stars A good starting point., 17 May 2015
If you're looking for a commentary to give you a feel for the book of 1 Kings this acts as a pretty good introduction. Welwyn Commentaries are always a pretty good choice for over-viewing passages so if you're seeking to lead Bible studies or preach through the book this is a pretty good place to start. As is usual with a Welwyn Commentary this is not claiming to be over academic and so if you're looking for a detailed and in-depth breakdown of the translation from the original Hebrew this is not the place you would start. All in all it's a pretty good commentary but I'm afraid I can't give it five stars as it misses out on being the best commentary on 1 Kings. That honour has to go to Dale Ralph Davies's excellent commentary 'The wisdom and the folly' on 1 Kings in Christian focus publications. Still a pretty good all-round commentary for all the above reasons and it would certainly be useful for personal Bible study as well.


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