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Morten Vindberg (Denmark)
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Song Of The Marching Children (jpn Lp Sleeve) Import Japan
Song Of The Marching Children (jpn Lp Sleeve) Import Japan

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Unique Band, 5 Jun 2008
Third album from Savage Rose, one of the very few truly original bands to come out of Denmark in the 1960's. In the early years there were quite a few changes in the line-up, but with the two Koppel brothers and the unique voice of Annisette as their corner-stones, they were always musically way ahead of most of bands of their time.

As the title of this album indicates, they had been touring quite heavily since their break-through in late 1967, and there may have been some exhaustion within the band at the time of these recordings.

Their first two album were both near perfect, and this one is also great, but slightly more uneven. Standouts are the slower tracks "Sailing Away" and "The Castle". The title track "Travellin" is nothing less than charming - an unusually folkish recording by the band, without Annisette's trademark vocals - their fourth single and a personal favourite.

Also the opening track "I'm Satisfied Mr Captain" with it's weird lyrics is great. And the epic closing track "My Family was Gay" is also a standout with it's at times weird harmonies and even weirder lyrics.

Musically the early Savage Rose were very unique, but could be compared with artists like Jefferson Airplane, The Doors and Janis Joplin.


R.I.P. [Japanese Import]
R.I.P. [Japanese Import]
Price: 35.76

5.0 out of 5 stars Great Album Finally Released in its Whole, 11 May 2008
In early 1967 the Zombies had not had a hit-record for more than two years, and it seemed that their time was over. They decided to record a final "real" album before they'd split up. The result was the highly acclaimed "Odessey and Oracle" which they recorded during the second half of 1967.

Of course they had hoped that one of the two first singles taken from these recordings "Friends of Mine" and "Care of Cell 44" would bring them back into the charts. And when this did not happen they "realised" that their time was over, so they disbanded before the album was actually released in April 1968.

Another single was chosen to promote the album, and the big success of "Time of the Season" in America came as a complete surprise. The album also reached the lower parts of the charts in the States.

There was much said and written of a possible Zombies re-union after this unexpected come-back. But Rod Argent and Chris White ( the two very gifted songwriters in the Zombies ) were already deeply involved in gathering a new band, which eventually would become "Argent".

In this transition period Argent and White were persuaded to do a final "Zombies" album which was given the title "R.I.P."

The album was supposed to consist of earlier out-takes and demos, ( with new overdubbings ) combined with new recordings.

The album was actually ready for release; the 12-songs track-listing was ready, I'm not sure if a cover was made, when the album was aborted after all.

This was a big shame, as it would have been a great album, which the Japanese release clearly confirms.

6 of the songs are original Zombies recordings from 1964-66, featuring Colin Blustone on vocals. He was called in to record new vocals to "Walking in the Sun" which is the earliest track, from late 1964, but he is not involved in any of the "new" 1968 recordings. Rod Argent, who is also an incredibly fine singer, takes over the vocals on these tracks. All these 1968 songs / recordings are great. "Imagine the Swan", "Smokey Day", "Girl Help Me", "I Could Spend the Day" are outstanding songs. "Imagine the Swan" was released as a single and was a minor hit in America.

The earlier recordings ( tracks 7-12 ) featuring Colin Blunstone are equally strong. "If It Don't Work Out" was written for Dusty Springfield in 1965 and is the song is included here with a little new overdubbing. This version was also released as the Zombies final single in July 1969.

Chris White's terrific "I'll Call You Mine" had been previously released on the B-side of the "Time of the Season" single.

Rod Argent's "I'll Keep Trying" is probably the most obscure tracks, as it was the last song to be released on a CD. The song was originally recorded back in 1965 and finished in 1968. "I Know She Will" and "Don't Cry For Me" come from the same period; incredible that these songs were not chosen for release.

The final song "Walking in the Sun" is also the earliest, but the recording and Blunstone's new vocals are so great that you would never have guessed that most of the track was recorded back in 1964.

Great to have this fine album finally released in its whole. Very good bonus-tracks, too. A big shame that it is still only released in Japan.


The BBC Sessions 1965-1968
The BBC Sessions 1965-1968
Price: 10.54

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Playing, 29 Mar 2008
This CD contains the majority of what the Yardbirds recorded on the BBC during 1965-68.

The first 3 tracks features Eric Clapton guitar, the last 6 Jimmy Page and the rest of them Jeff Beck.

Most of these recordings are very good and sounding really nice. They prove that the band was very competent and able to re-create their fine studio-recordings in live situations.

A few of these songs were never released on any of the regular Yardbirds albums.

"Love me Like I Love You" is a band compostion from 1965; from shortly after Clapton left. The song is quite nice, but it probably never reached a satisfactory final arrangement.

Their version of Elmore James'"Dust My Blues" is very good, but almost the same as Jeff's Boogie from "Roger the Engineer".

"Scratch My Back" is another band-composition that eventually developed into "Rack My Mind".

"The Sun is Shining" is another Elmore James song, also covered by Fleetwood Mac. A great blues; and arranged pretty much like "New York City Blues".

A big surprise for me was their cover of Bob Dylan's "Most Likely You Go Your Way". The recording is from the jimmy Page era. They were obviously at this stage in big confusion about which musical direction to follow.

The strongest of these "new" tracks is without comparison the closing track "My Baby"; unfortunately this is also one the tracks in the poorest sound-quality.

Of the more well-known Yardbirds material all Jimmy Page recordings sound very inspired. I particularly like "Little Games", "Think About It" and "Goodnight Sweet Josephine". Unfortunately they do sound like they were not taken from original BBC-tapes.

The versions of "Shapes of Things", "Heart Full of Soul", "I Ain't Done Wrong", "You're a Better Man", "Evil Hearted You" etc are great. In fact most Jeff Beck recordings are sounding surprisingly good.

I have to note that I never understood why they bothered to record a song like "Hang on Sloopy". The version here sound even more uninspired than the "For Your Love" version.

This CD is obviously a must-buy for Yardbirds fans.


Like An Old Fashioned Waltz
Like An Old Fashioned Waltz
Price: 7.43

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Her Most Enduring!, 29 Mar 2008
This was Sandy Denny's third solo-album. On her second album, the much acclaimed "Sandy", she had begun a slow departure from her folk-music roots. On this album you probably would not have thought of there being any folk-roots at all, if it had not been for her backing band consisting of people with strong roots in Britsih folk-rock - people like Richard Thompson, Dave Pegg, Dave Mattacks, Jerry Donahue, Gerry Conway, Pat Donaldson and several more.

Sandy and her husband/producer Trevor Lucas were seeking a broader approach with a wider range of styles, using heavier production; often with use of strings; which some people thought a progress, and other people hated.

The opener, the gorgeous "Solo" is one of Sandy's very best songs ( I would buy the album for that song alone ). The nostalgic title-track is almost as strong, in spite of a quite unrestrained use of strings. The bonus-track version proves the use strings quite unnecessary.

Her covers of two old romantic jazz-ballads, "Whispering Grass" and "Until the Real Things Comes Along" are actually quite good, though some people find them out of place on a Sandy Denny album.

"Friends" is another highlight on the album - a classic Sandy Denny song; according to the liner notes on the "No More Sad Refrains" anthology, the lyrics were written about Pete Townshend; not a very flattering picture drawn of him there.

"Carnival" is a tune in the same vein as "Friends" - though darker and not quite as melodic.

"Dark the Night" is a light tune, but with dark lyrics. "I'm not good at singing happy songs", I believe Sandy stated at a certain point.

"At the End of the Day" has such a beautiful melody line, and possibly her ultimate love song. The bonus-track version with no strings is my favourite.

The closing track "No End" with its strange, but thought-provoking lyrics, gives the album the perfect end.

"King and Queen of England" is an outtake from the sessions, but was probably thought not strong enough when the final track-listing was to be made. I think I'll agree to that, though some might have preferred it to one of her jazz-covers.

In spite of some flaws ( too much strings ) the album as a whole is her most consistent and enduring, with Denny on top in her song-writing.


The Human Menagerie
The Human Menagerie

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Their Most Consistent Album, 25 Mar 2008
This review is from: The Human Menagerie (Audio CD)
This was Steve Harley and Cockney Rebels' first album - originally released in 1973. Cockney Rebel was a glam-rock act ; somewhere between David Bowie and Doctor's of Madness. At least their first 3 albums were really great; from then Harley's songwriting seemed to be somewhat exhausted.

This album, probably their most consistent, contains their first classic single "Sebastian", which was a hit record in several countries, though never made it to the top 20 in Britain. The song may appear a little dated today ( maybe because of its 7 minutes playing time ) - but their follow up single "Judy Teen", which on some versions of the album is included as a bonus-track, is still among my favourite Rebel songs.

The album contains many great tracks; both ballads and rockers - quite impressive considering that this was their debut-album. Songs like "Hideaway", "Loretta's Tale" and "Mirror Freak" have obvious hit-potential. "My Only Vice" and "Muriel the Actor" are simply charming tracks.

"Death Trip", like Sebastian, is an ambitious piece of work, with a lot of inspiration from classical music.

A great album!


Airwaves
Airwaves

3.0 out of 5 stars Badfinger's "Come-back" Album, 1 Feb 2008
This review is from: Airwaves (Audio CD)
Airwaves from 1979 was the first Badfinger album to be released without Pete Ham, who tragically committed suicide in 1975. Of course he is sadly missed on this album, which only feaures two members from Badfinger's heyday; Tom Evans and Joey Molland. After Pete's death the group disbanded and both Tom and Joey were in other bands.
In 1978 they felt like reuniting and drummer Mike Gibbins were also invited to a rehearsal before these recordings took place. Unfortunately Mike quickly left again and he is consequently not playing on this album. The line-up is: Tom Evans: bass and vocals; Joey Molland: guitar and vocals; Joe Tansin: lead guitar; Ken Harck: drums; Andy Newmark: drums and Nicky Hopkins: keyboards.

Ken Harck left during the recordings and he was replaced by Andy Newmark who came in to finish the album. Joe Tansin also left soon after the final recordings. Nicky Hopkins only appeared as session musician; he was never a member of the band.

The trends in popular pop/rock music had changed markedly during the 5 years that had passed since the last Badfinger album, so obviously the album had to be different from their earlier albums. Producer David Malloy has often been critizised for poor production on this Badfinger album. "He had not been able to find the real Badfinger-sound". I think that's an unfair and wrong concluson. Actually a lot of the album is really good. Tom Evans' songs like "Lost Inside Your Love" and "Sail Away" are true highlights. Joey's "Love is Gonna Come at Last" is a very commercial number and it was released a single. "The Dreamer", also by Joey, is a nice ballad, and a track you may not discover the first two or three times you listen to the album. Joe Tansin wrote two songs for the album; "Sympathy" and "The Winner". "Sympathy" is too commercial for my taste, almost disco-like; "The Winner" is a rocker similar to many of Joey's songs. Tansin shows on several tracks that he's a fabulous guitarist and some of the weaker tracks are helped a lot from his guitar-playing. The playing time is rather short, so it's a shame that this reisssue version doesn't feature any of the 5 bonus tracks that were added to the 1999 CD version. Especially "Send Me Some Love", "Can You Feel The Rain" and "One More Time" were great additions.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 4, 2010 10:50 PM GMT


Airwaves
Airwaves
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: 33.95

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Badfinger's "Come-back" Album, 1 Feb 2008
This review is from: Airwaves (Audio CD)
Airwaves from 1979 was the first Badfinger album to be released without Pete Ham, who tragically committed suicide in 1975. Of course he is sadly missed on this album, which only feaures two members from Badfinger's heyday; Tom Evans and Joey Molland. After Pete's death the group disbanded and both Tom and Joey were in other bands.
In 1978 they felt like reuniting and drummer Mike Gibbins were also invited to a rehearsal before these recordings took place. Unfortunately Mike quickly left again and he is consequently not playing on this album. The line-up is: Tom Evans: bass and vocals; Joey Molland: guitar and vocals; Joe Tansin: lead guitar; Ken Harck: drums; Andy Newmark: drums and Nicky Hopkins: keyboards.

Ken Harck left during the recordings and he was replaced by Andy Newmark who came in to finish the album. Joe Tansin also left soon after the final recordings. Nicky Hopkins only appeared as session musician; he was never a member of the band.

The trends in popular pop/rock music had changed markedly during the 5 years that had passed since the last Badfinger album, so obviously the album had to be different from their earlier albums. Producer David Malloy has often been critizised for poor production on this Badfinger album. "He had not been able to find the real Badfinger-sound". I think that's an unfair and wrong concluson. Actually a lot of the album is really good. Tom Evans' songs like "Lost Inside Your Love" and "Sail Away" are true highlights. Joey's "Love is Gonna Come at Last" is a very commercial number and it was released a single. "The Dreamer", also by Joey, is a nice ballad, and a track you may not discover the first two or three times you listen to the album. Joe Tansin wrote two songs for the album; "Sympathy" and "The Winner". "Sympathy" is too commercial for my taste, almost disco-like; "The Winner" is a rocker similar to many of Joey's songs. Tansin shows on several tracks that he's a fabulous guitarist and some of the weaker tracks are helped a lot from his guitar-playing. The playing time is rather short, so it's a shame that this reisssue version doesn't feature any of the 5 bonus tracks that were added to the 1999 CD version. Especially "Send Me Some Love", "Can You Feel The Rain" and "One More Time" were great additions.


Count To Ten
Count To Ten
Price: 11.21

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Strong Songwriting!, 13 Jan 2008
This review is from: Count To Ten (Audio CD)
The new album from Danish singer Tina Dico, must be her strongest - so far. Extremely well produced and filled with strong personal songs. Musically I find her in the same league as Sarah McLachlan and Sheryl Crow; without quite having the vocal strength of McLachlan or the knack of writing hits like Crow - at least not yet - In fact I would not be surprised if one or two of the songs on this great collection actually made it to the charts.

Some of the songs have an immediate catchiness about them; such as "On the Run", "My Business" and perhaps , "You Know Better" - which after a quite first verse turns into a great power-pop ballad.

Overall it feels like a very personal album with fine lyrics dealing with existential questions about finding oneself. Some songs won't have the immediate appeal of the before mentioned; but the moving and keytrack "Sacre Coeur", the fine ballad "Open Wide", the half-acoustic "Night Cab" and not least the bluesy and soulful "Cruel to the Sensitive Kind" are likely grow on you. Somehow "Cruel to the Sensitive Kind" reminds me of Sheryl Crow's "I Believe"

There are really no weak tracks here - apart from the un-necessary hidden track.

All in all an impressive effort from Tina Dico.


Silence Is Easy
Silence Is Easy
Offered by westworld-
Price: 10.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fine Album!, 4 Jan 2008
This review is from: Silence Is Easy (Audio CD)
"Silence is Easy" was the second album from young English band "Starsailor". The band has often been compared to both Coldplay and Radiohead, and given there is an unmistakeably British sound to their music. Personally I feel that a comparison with Suede and Brett Anderson would be more obvious; especially on the ballads.

The album starts off very strongly with 4 great songs. The optimistic up-beat "Music was Saved" is the perfect opener - strange that the song was not picked as a single. Two short, but strong ballads follow. "Fidelity" and the beatiful waltzy "Some of Us".

Then comes the Phil Spector produced hit-single and title-track "Silence is Easy".

The following tracks are by no means bad, though a few of them are a little weighed down by heavy strings-arrangements.

The extremely catchy disco-type pop-hit "Four to the Floor" is probably the most memorable of the last part of the album - actually it is very different from the usual Starsailor sound and style.

The half-acoustic "Shark Food" may not hit you the first two or three times you hear it, but there is a good chance it will turn into a favourite eventually.

A very strong album from one of the most promising new English bands.


This Desert Life
This Desert Life
Offered by DVD Overstocks
Price: 4.69

4.0 out of 5 stars Classic American Rock, 1 Dec 2007
This review is from: This Desert Life (Audio CD)
Third studio album from Counting Crows, "This Desert Life" has a handful of very good songs, a couple of decent songs and also a few misses.

"Hanging Around" was one of the singles, and it's both catchy and melodic, but the repetitive chaotic ending never really appealed to me. Much better is second track "Mrs Potter's Lullaby", an epic song that would have suited the great Van Morrison perfectly.

Other favourites are the REM sounding "Four Days", the dramatic "I Wish I was a Girl", the melancholy "Speedway" and the semi-acoustic closer "St. Robinson in his Cadillac Dreams" - great fat organ and mandolin.

The album as a whole may not be quite up to the high standards of their debut, but still a great album that will satisfy fans of the band. Classic American Rock!


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