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Thermos Everyday 430 Travel Mug, 0.45L
Thermos Everyday 430 Travel Mug, 0.45L
Offered by TCB DIRECT
Price: £10.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible, pointless waste of money, 14 Dec. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I'm not sure what the point of this product is. It's described as a `Travel Mug' but seems completely ill-equipped to cope with travel of any kind.

There is a label that states that the mug is not leak-proof, it actually seems to leak pretty profusely however tightly you do it up, and it turns out it doesn't keep hot liquids hot for very long, in my experience anything over 2 hours in the mug and the hot liquid has gone lukewarm.

To my mind these are the two most important details to get right in any kind of product designed to carry hot drinks. Therefore unless you are planning to only use it inside your house and `travel' from the kitchen to the living room with it it's utterly pointless, and I guess in that situation you'd just use a standard mug instead.


A Pale View of Hills
A Pale View of Hills
by Kazuo Ishiguro
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Subtle, slow burning, highly readable and ultimately satisfying, 2 Jan. 2012
This review is from: A Pale View of Hills (Paperback)
Having just finished `A Pale View of Hills' and this being the only Ishiguro novel I've tried, my first impressions of this author are good. The story is told from the point of view of Etsuko, a Japanese widow living in rural England while coming to terms with her daughter Keiko's suicide. The perspective shifts in time, often abruptly, from post-war Japan to her time in England.

His style here is understated, subtle and at times deceptively mundane - I occasionally found myself longing for some devastating event or revelation, however this I think is wholly intentional of the approach, the impact comes from what is not said and what is left to your imagination. There are a number of passages in the book that furnish a sense of unease through the subtly haunting imagery and suggest darker things than are made explicit.

The story deals with themes of gender roles, treatment of children and reliability of memory. The ending is ultimately ambiguous with the reader being left to piece together many elements of the plot that don't add up. This, to my mind is a good thing however readers that appreciate novels where `all the loose ends' are tied up and concrete explanations are given will probably think differently.


A Pale View of Hills (Faber Firsts)
A Pale View of Hills (Faber Firsts)
by Kazuo Ishiguro
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Subtle, slow burning, highly readable and ultimately satisfying, 2 Jan. 2012
Having just finished `A Pale View of Hills' and this being the only Ishiguro novel I've tried, my first impressions of this author are good. The story is told from the point of view of Etsuko, a Japanese widow living in rural England while coming to terms with her daughter Keiko's suicide. The perspective shifts in time, often abruptly, from post-war Japan to her time in England.

His style here is understated, subtle and at times deceptively mundane - I occasionally found myself longing for some devastating event or revelation, however this I think is wholly intentional of the approach, the impact comes from what is not said and what is left to your imagination. There are a number of passages in the book that furnish a sense of unease through the subtly haunting imagery and suggest darker things than are made explicit.

The story deals with themes of gender roles, treatment of children and reliability of memory. The ending is ultimately ambiguous with the reader being left to piece together many elements of the plot that don't add up. This, to my mind is a good thing however readers that appreciate novels where `all the loose ends' are tied up and concrete explanations are given will probably think differently.


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