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Waqar (Halifax, West Yorkshire United Kingdom)

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Waylander (A Drenai Novel)
Waylander (A Drenai Novel)
by David Gemmell
Edition: Paperback

3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Very entertaining light fantasy story, if only I had not read others that are so similar from the same Author, 21 Mar 2007
Let me first of all point out that this book/story is a very entertaining light historic fantasy and this is something that I have come to expect from Gemmell.

And, this is where the problem lies:

I loved Morningstar, and Legend, and First Chronicles of Druss the Legend. I also loved Quest for Lost Heroes (I read Waylander books last first)and Echoes of the Great Song and even though these last two books were diffrent in the types of stories they were, they are still all so similar.

Gemmell seems to have a formulae for his books and doesnt seem to stray far from it:

- Old heroes coming to end of their time, having done lots of 'bad' stuff before but becoming moral now

- Hopeless odds either in their quest or in that they are stuck behind a fortress.

- Some tragedy - either the hero will die or one/some of the characters that you have come to like/love during the reading of the book.

All the books above convinced me that Gemmel was by far my favourite author of "LIGHT" fantasy, where I could very quickly become emersed in the book after a hard day of dealing with responsibilities and realities of moderen day living. I say Light because Gemmell's books are welcome change sometimes from the heavy, endless and involved great epics out there from the top authors like R Jordon (Wheel of Time Series), G R R Martin (Song of Ice & Fire series, S Erikson (Books of the Malazan series).

Let me state again Gemmell writes extremely entertaining light fantasy and this book is no exception, but you are likely to come to the realisation (whichever way around you read his books) that you have been here before once you have read anough of his books. Perhaps I should have a greater gap between the next time I read one of his books


Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen)
Memories of Ice (Book 3 of The Malazan Book of the Fallen)
by Steven Erikson
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: 6.99

14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Memories of Ice (Malazan Book of the Fallen), 30 May 2006
This is definitely the best of the three books so far.

It would be too difficult to describe the story line here, because it involves so many plots and sub-plots and shifting back and forth between them, but which all do come together, as always in Erikson's books, to a final climax.

As always, there is so much happening in Erikson's books that it is difficult to keep up, remember all the names and the different sub plot lines. For a book that comprises nearly 1,000 pages it was impressive that my attention was grabbed from the beginning and I found it extremely difficult to put the book down right up the end. It was fast paced, loads of action and very eventful through out. Many of the old characters from the first book (Gardens of the Moon) were back in this book.

You begin to learn so much more about characters like Quick Ben the mage, Whiskeyjack, you learn more about the significance of Paran, it was also great to find out a bit more about the enigmatic Amandor Rake. There are also a host of new characters. This is the first time that we are introduced to the sinister Bauchelain and Korbal Broach. They are the main characters in Erikson's short novellas. I did want to find out more about them, but I still don't understand how they progressed the story. I guess these characters and many others just shows how VAST and EPIC the Malazan series of books are. At times it is difficult to maintain an understanding of all that is happening.

This is definitely fantasy, but not like the usual `run of the mill' fantasy books out there. There is no mention of Elves, dwarves, etc. However, Erikson has created in the Malazan series a world that has never before been even hinted at in any of the fantasy books I have ever read before. The scale and scope of the stories so far seems vast in that they encompass not only people but also, different geographic cilivilisations and races that are non-human in nature. The books describe histories that are hundreds of thousands of years old, it includes Gods and ascendants. It is a world where the gods also play an active role and have their own motives and characteristics. It is a dark, very savage and barbaric world that no other fantasy novel I have ever read can has been able to match (perhaps Donaldson's Thomas Covenenant Chronicles). The story, the grand scale of events and world building are truly epic and this is one of the few times that no one would be able to argue with that statement.

Praise to Erikson for his amazing imagination that has enabled him to create such a vast world and in such detail. He is obviously getting better and I have noticed the improvements in the three books so far. He is obviously one of the handful of top fantasy writers out there (Tolkien the master, Martin, Jordan and Hobb). I hope that he continues to improve and that I (as well as all other readers) continue to read and enjoy his work.


Get Shorty [1996] [DVD]
Get Shorty [1996] [DVD]
Dvd ~ Gene Hackman
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: 2.73

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Get Shorty, 13 May 2006
This review is from: Get Shorty [1996] [DVD] (DVD)
Its so funny and entrertaining throughout... I liked it.
Thought Travolta was brill in it.


Warriors of Mars
Warriors of Mars
by Michael Moorcock
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Warriors of Mars, 13 Oct 2004
When I first read this book at the ripe old age of 12/13 I thought it was probably the best book I had read in my life.
I have finally got the chance to read it again at the age of 37. I must admit time, age and experience of other books in the genre (especially over the last 10-15 years) does change the way you thought of things before.
This does not mean that I no longer liked it. I am still impressed with Moorcock's imagination, his ability to tell a highly entertaining story without waffling for ages on descriptions that dont really matter (Jordon's Wheel of Time Series comes to Mind here). In fact, he does not spend much time on descriptions of any kind... he really does get on with the story at a break kneck speed and before you know it you have completed the trilogy.
His writing style is much more in the vain of the pulp fiction writers like Edgar Rice Burroughs. In fact, in his recent new introduction to the trilogy, he not only admits that he has copied his main heroic character from Burroughs Warrior on Old Mars but also the pulp fiction style.
Unfortunately, the trilogy cannot any longer be considered a monumental feat after the massive world building, characterisation and epic story lines created by Jordon, Martin (Song of Ice...), Erikson (Malazan series), etc. However, it is a very good read


Echoes Of The Great Song
Echoes Of The Great Song
by David Gemmell
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.59

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Great new stand alone story from Gemmell, 6 July 2004
I was quite blown away by this very different storyline.
As another reviewer points out...I also dont know why but I loved this story. It so different from your normal run of the mill fantasy fiction; It flows along at a good steady pace with new characters and surprises appearing and they dont let you get bored at all.
I have not given this a 5 star because in effect it is only a short story compared to the ongoing multi book epics by Jordon, Martin and Erikson. However, as a stand alone one book story it is very impressive.
I won't give the story line away, but it is well worth reading and was just as entertaining as Gemmell's "MorningStar", which I thoroughly enjoyed as well.
Read it!!! I'm sure most fantasy fiction fans will be glad they did


The Eye Of The World: Book 1 of the Wheel of Time: 1/12
The Eye Of The World: Book 1 of the Wheel of Time: 1/12
by Robert Jordan
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: 8.79

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Eye of the World (Wheel of Time Series), 9 Jan 2004
I can truly say that for the first time since I read Lord of the Rings (LotR), over 22 years ago, The Eye of the World and the whole Wheel of Time series is a work that seems that it will be comparable to Tolkien's LotR and Silmarillion "masterpieces" so long as this quality of world building is carried on throughout the series. In fact, in certain ways (dare I say) it is better then Tolkiens work in that this Epic has much more character development, and a believable quality that some characters have grey qualities and are not just black or white (good & evil). I say this after reading some of the other best Fantasy writers around like Donaldson, Eddings, Fiest Hobb and Erikson, etch (not yet read Martin’s Song of Ice & Fire series).
There is great potential for Jordan to achieve something that is monumental here and some of the praises made about Tolkien can be said about Jordan as well.
However, there a few criticisms that I feel may let him down - I noticed that he can spend too much time being descriptive and “waffly”, which can be a bit boring when you want to progress with the story. This is further borne out by the reviews I have read about the latest few books in the series, i.e., that Jordon seems to be dragging out the story more then he needs to. Also, I really can’t wait for Jordan to finish writing the last book in the series and not just redoing earlier versions in different forms (book 1 in parts, etc). Please Mr Jordan don’t write more books just for the sake of it - DON’T SPOIL IT… Get on with it.
To anybody out there that reads Fantasy this is the crème de le crème and you HAVE TO READ IT.


Power That Preserves (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever)
Power That Preserves (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever)
by Stephen R. Donaldson
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Power That Preserves (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant), 1 Jan 2004
Book 3 of one of the most original, imaginative and best Fantasy series’ out there
I have given this four stars because I believe that Tolkiens work is beyond the star rating and this series is below the rating I would give to Jordon’s Wheel of Time series (so far up to book 4) and Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire. However I was extremely impressed with Donaldson’s original and imaginative fantasy world.
Donaldson does a very different take by creating such an unusual hero as Thomas Covenant, the Leper (and you don’t forget this throughout the books). Donaldson has created a fantasy world that you can begin to visualise and become immersed in – a sign of excellent fantasy. Covenant is from the real world and is transported into this other fantasy world, which was refreshing for a change. This world is dark, bleak, depressing and there seems to be little hope for it. In fact, you can draw parallels with it and the life of Covenant, who is a leper.
Thomas Covenant finds himself in another world whenever he becomes unconscious, which he therefore thinks is just a dream and refuses to admit that the world is real. He is seen by the inhabitants as some sort of incarnation of a past saviour of their world and revered despite the fact one of his first acts is to rape an innocent young women that has helped him. Covenant’s wedding ring is made of white gold and in this dream world it is the source of “wild magic”, a great power that even the most powerful being in the books is afraid off. However, Covenant does not know how to unleash this power, whenever it is unleashed it is not through deliberate self-will. Covenant’s continuous moaning and self-pity does not endear the reader to him.
Throughout the books you begin to feel the desperation of the world and people who are trying to defend themselves against the domination of the ultimate evil force, Lord Foul. You don’t actually come across Foul till the last book, but since even his minions are so terrifying and powerful you begin to get a sense of an ultimate struggle between good and evil of world and universal proportions, but where “Satan” is much more powerful and the Creator is constrained and has to work through VERY WEAK intermediaries. The three “Ravers” are Lord Foul’s main henchmen (like Suaron’s Black Riders in the Lord of the Rings). The Writer is able to effectively portray them as powerful, depraved creatures that are single-mindedly following their master’s destructive bidding. (these nasty pieces of work you definitely would not like to meet in a dark alley; even if you had all your mates with you).
The Power that Preserves
Is the final book of the first Trilogy/Chronicles. Despite Covenant achieving his goal, this is not a book/series that has a happy ending because there has been so much death and, destruction in this world, and many of the characters that the reader has begun to feel for have died. Even the Bloodguard seem less superhuman now that their Oath has been broken, which you can not help but feel is such a loss. The unemotional Bannor has changed so much in this book. We also finally get the confrontation between Covenant and Lord Foul in this book.
I am surprised... in fact, shocked that there are so few reviews out there about this series of books. Donaldson’s world building is vivid and powerful through the creation of so many peoples, creatures and history. I especially enjoyed the reference to the historical events and characters of the world. This is powerful writing and imaginative and I would recommend any fantasy buffs out there who have not read the series, to do so.
It is definitely one of the best fantasy series’ out there today.


The Illearth War (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever)
The Illearth War (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever)
by Stephen R. Donaldson
Edition: Paperback

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Illearth War (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliev, 24 Dec 2003
Book 2 of one of the most original, imaginative and best Fantasy series’ out there
I have given this four stars because I believe that Tolkiens work is beyond the star rating and this series is below the rating I would give to Jordon’s Wheel of Time series (so far up to book 4) and Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire. However I was extremely impressed with Donaldson’s original and imaginative fantasy world.
Donaldson does a very different take by creating such an unusual hero as Thomas Covenant, the Leper (and you don’t forget this throughout the books). Donaldson has created a fantasy world that you can begin to visualise and become immersed in – a sign of excellent fantasy. Covenant is from the real world and is transported into this other fantasy world, which was refreshing for a change. This world is dark, bleak, depressing and there seems to be little hope for it. In fact, you can draw parallels with it and the life of Covenant, who is a leper.
Thomas Covenant finds himself in another world whenever he becomes unconscious, which he therefore thinks is just a dream and refuses to admit that the world is real. He is seen by the inhabitants as some sort of incarnation of a past saviour of their world and revered despite the fact one of his first acts is to rape an innocent young women that has helped him. Covenant’s wedding ring is made of white gold and in this dream world it is the source of “wild magic”, a great power that even the most powerful being in the books is afraid off. However, Covenant does not know how to unleash this power, whenever it is unleashed it is not through deliberate self-will. Covenant’s continuous moaning and self-pity does not endear the reader to him.
Throughout the books you begin to feel the desperation of the world and people who are trying to defend themselves against the domination of the ultimate evil force, Lord Foul. You don’t actually come across Foul till the last book, but since even his minions are so terrifying and powerful you begin to get a sense of an ultimate struggle between good and evil of world and universal proportions, but where “Satan” is much more powerful and the Creator is constrained and has to work through VERY WEAK intermediaries. The three “Ravers” are Lord Foul’s main henchmen (like Suaron’s Black Riders in the Lord of the Rings). The Writer is able to effectively portray them as powerful, depraved creatures that are single-mindedly following their master’s destructive bidding. (these nasty pieces of work you definitely would not like to meet in a dark alley; even if you had all your mates with you).
The Illearth War
Is the second book in the first Trilogy/Chronicles. The book deals primarily with the War, 40 years after the time Covenant was last there, although in the real world only days/weeks have elapsed. You are introduced to another character from the real world, Hile Troy. He has a much more positive view of this world because he was blind but can see here. I slaughter of the Giants is such a tragedy and you know something awful is going to happen as a result of the the Bloodguard keeping a piece of the Illearth Stone, at the close of the book
I am surprised... in fact, shocked that there are so few reviews out there about this series of books. Donaldson’s world building is vivid and powerful through the creation of so many peoples, creatures and history. I especially enjoyed the reference to the historical events and characters of the world. This is powerful writing and imaginative and I would recommend any fantasy buffs out there who have not read the series, to do so.
It is definitely one of the best fantasy series’ out there today.


Lord Foul's Bane (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever)
Lord Foul's Bane (Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever)
by Stephen R. Donaldson
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lord Fouls Bane, 17 Dec 2003
One of the most original, imaginative and best Fantasy series’ out there
Donaldson does a very different take by creating such an unusual hero as Thomas Covenant, the Leper (and you don’t forget this throughout the books). Donaldson has created a fantasy world that you can begin to visualise and become immersed in – a sign of excellent fantasy. Covenant is from the real world and is transported into this other fantasy world, which was refreshing for a change. This world is dark, bleak, depressing and there seems to be little hope for it. In fact, you can draw parallels with it and the life of Covenant, who is a leper.
Thomas Covenant finds himself in another world whenever he becomes unconscious, which he therefore thinks is just a dream and refuses to admit that the world is real. He is seen by the inhabitants as some sort of incarnation of a past saviour of their world and revered despite the fact one of his first acts is to rape an innocent young women that has helped him. Covenant’s wedding ring is made of white gold and in this dream world it is the source of “wild magic”, a great power that even the most powerful being in the books is afraid off. However, Covenant does not know how to unleash this power, whenever it is unleashed it is not through deliberate self-will. Covenant’s continuous moaning and self-pity does not endear the reader to him.
Throughout the books you begin to feel the desperation of the world and people who are trying to defend themselves against the domination of the ultimate evil force, Lord Foul. You don’t actually come across Foul till the last book, but since even his minions are so terrifying and powerful you begin to get a sense of an ultimate struggle between good and evil of world and universal proportions, but where “Satan” is much more powerful and the Creator is constrained and has to work through VERY WEAK intermediaries. The three “Ravers” are Lord Foul’s main henchmen (like Suaron’s Black Riders in the Lord of the Rings). The Writer is able to effectively portray them as powerful, depraved creatures that are single-mindedly following their master’s destructive bidding. (these nasty pieces of work you definitely would not like to meet in a dark alley; even if you had all your mates with you).
Lord Foul’s Bane
Is the First book in the first Trilogy/Chronicles. Fortunately, the book does not spend too much time in the real world, but sets the scene for Covenants character and leprosy background. In fact, I found the information very informative and you do begin to feel for the people that are victims of the disease. We are introduced to my favourite characters in the book/series; Giant Saltheart Foamfollower and Bannor the Bloodguard.
I am shocked by the fact that there are so few reviews out there about these books. Donaldson’s world building is vivid and powerful through the creation of so many peoples, creatures and history. I especially enjoyed the reference to the historical events and characters of the world. This is powerful writing and imaginative and I would recommend any fantasy buffs out there who have not read the series, to do so.
It is definitely one of the best fantasy series’ out there today.


The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever
by Stephen R. Donaldson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever, 13 Dec 2003
One of the most original, imaginative and best Fantasy series’ out there
I have given this four stars because I believe that Tolkiens work is beyond the star rating and this series is below the rating I would give to Jordon’s Wheel of Time series (so far up to book 4) and Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire. However I was extremely impressed with Donaldson’s original and imaginative fantasy world.
Donaldson does a very different take by creating such an unusual hero as Thomas Covenant, the Leper (and you don’t forget this throughout the books). Donaldson has created a fantasy world that you can begin to visualise and become immersed in – a sign of excellent fantasy. Covenant is from the real world and is transported into this other fantasy world, which was refreshing for a change. This world is dark, bleak, depressing and there seems to be little hope for it. In fact, you can draw parallels with it and the life of Covenant, who is a leper.
Throughout the books you begin to feel the desperation of the world and people who are trying to defend themselves against the domination of the ultimate evil force, Lord Foul. You don’t actually come across Foul till the last book, but since even his minions are so terrifying and powerful you begin to get a sense of an ultimate struggle between good and evil of world and universal proportions, but where “Satan” is much more powerful and the Creator is constrained and has to work through VERY WEAK intermediaries. The three “Ravers” are Lord Foul’s main henchmen (like Suaron’s Black Riders in the Lord of the Rings). The Writer is able to effectively portray them as powerful, depraved creatures that are single-mindedly following their master’s destructive bidding. (these nasty pieces of work you definitely would not like to meet in a dark alley; even if you had all your mates with you).


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