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M*A*S*H - Season 1 (Collector's Edition) [DVD] [1972]
M*A*S*H - Season 1 (Collector's Edition) [DVD] [1972]
Dvd ~ Alan Alda
Price: 8.75

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an excellent television show, 11 Nov 2003
For some reason I remember the M*A*S*H themetune and credits but not the show; I guess it was on TV at my bedtime. Now that I'm a grown up and I've watch it on DVD I feel compelled to recommend it to anyone who tends to the serious but has a little nerve centre motivated by sentimentality and humour. Although some of the show's morals are quite seriously dated (I mean mostly the treatment of women and homosexuality) there's a lot that is scalpel-sharpe. Robert Altman, the director of the film M*A*S*H, has complained that the television show went on too long in that it left viewers regarding Asians as 'the enemy' for too long but from this first series I take a strongly anti-war theme and the feeling that the heroes (the surgeons) see all human life as equally worthy and all warmongering military chiefs as equally dim. I guess I'd find the demonisation of the character Frank Burns and the patronisation of the character Rader harder to swallow with every series but I think this first one is top class.


Yes Minister - Series Three [1982] [DVD] [1980]
Yes Minister - Series Three [1982] [DVD] [1980]
Dvd ~ Paul Eddington
Offered by themediamerchants
Price: 3.95

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The unpleasant truth, 11 Nov 2003
This excellent televison show is now more than twenty years old and yet its needle like wit is still piercing the, it turns out, rather thin veneer of competence encasing the British government. Perhpas most worryingly of all is the fact that some of the issues it lampoons (e.g. an integrated transport policy) are still the stuff of which dreams are made. Buy it, watch it, laugh at it and then roll your eyes and vote for the best of a bad lot.


Mr Smith Goes To Washington [DVD] [2001]
Mr Smith Goes To Washington [DVD] [2001]
Dvd ~ James Stewart
Offered by qualityfilmsfromuk
Price: 18.90

5 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why do I love this film?, 11 Nov 2003
Mister Smith Goes to Washington is a funny-serious-sad film. Perhaps most of Capra's films are, I haven't really analysed it. It seems to me that the film is probably 'fundamentally flawed' because it ends in such an unlikely way. I love it anyway. While the film has a lot of sentimentality in it the ending is actually quite horrific. I find that I can't help but imagine what it would be like to be next to a character in a film and when I watch this film I feel terribly moved by the emotions invoked by the actors. I'm not American and I can't imagine if that helps or hinders but I guess I'm not alone in my admiration from afar of the sentiment of America's Bill of Rights and Constitution and this film turns those ideas into a heartbeat that I find myself fearing will cease if Mister Smith doesn't succeed.


Defence Of The Realm [DVD]
Defence Of The Realm [DVD]
Dvd ~ Gabriel Byrne
Offered by WorldCinema
Price: 14.99

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Please let this be completely made up, 11 Nov 2003
This review is from: Defence Of The Realm [DVD] (DVD)
I'm so pleased that some people have already written positive reviews of this film. It's one of my favourites and not because I'm a Scottish journalist (it doesn't exactly show us in an entirely positive light). It just shows how following a single loose thread can lead to something awesome. Referring to those previous reviews, the story is convoluted because it should be. Controversy and conspiracy aren't straightforward (not that I'm pretending to be a veteran but just think of your family politics and imagine it as a kind of case study for everything; every single person adds their own confusion). If anyone has been put off by the thought of there being no sex I advise you to keep a look out for what's in the background and perhaps you can be content with a truckload of sexism. For everyone else I advise you sit back and let yourself be pulled into this gripping tale. Once you're finished you can contemplate the thought of the Executive Producer now being a Lord.


They F*** You Up: How to Survive Family Life
They F*** You Up: How to Survive Family Life
by Oliver James
Edition: Paperback

37 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An uncomfortable read, 9 July 2003
It is very important that you read Oliver James' introduction to this book if you choose to buy it. If you've decided to read a book sub-titled 'How to Survive Family Life' the chances are you may already hold at least the foundations of a grudge against your parents. Oliver James makes it clear that he does not wish to make family strife worse. The book's title is inspired by a Philip Larkin poem and readers should know that the poem's ultitmate advice is not to have children. This book ends on a much more upbeat note. In fact throughout the book the author contends that a person's pyschology is moulded by their parents and that this is a much happier position than if personalities, and therefore personality disorders, were all 100% genetic. He maintains that with education and support parents can change for the better. He also believes that people can use analysis of their childhoods to see why they behave the way they do and perhaps understand themselves for the better - and at the very least ensure their own children get an easier ride of things. The book treats the reader, and therefore every reader, as if he/she was a patient and it is somewhat frustrating not to be able to talk back. Interestingly (please note if you are a publisher) I liked it because I didn't feel beneath it in the way I do with many 'self-help' titles.


The Disappearance of Childhood (Vintage)
The Disappearance of Childhood (Vintage)
by Neil Postman
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.83

47 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PHEW:I THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE, 6 Nov 2000
In Postman's book you will find the substance behind the phrase my parents' peers use constantly: it was never like that in my day. Said with a shake of the head over the dress sense of the average pre-pubescent girl it may sound like just another bit of grown-up nonsense but thought out and presented in the way Postman does in The Disappearance of Childhood it suddenly becomes terrifying. Childhood is on the endangered list. Postman charts the emergence of childhood alongside the invention of printing. He describes childhood as being a place cut off from the secrets of the printed world. If children know what adults know then there is nothing to distinguish between them. Read it to find out what let the cat out of the bag and perhaps a hint about how to put it back in again.


Scoop: A Novel About Journalists (Twentieth Century Classics)
Scoop: A Novel About Journalists (Twentieth Century Classics)
by Evelyn Waugh
Edition: Paperback

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RUSH CHECKOUTWARD URGENT STOP, 6 Nov 2000
Waugh effortlessly sucked me into this barmy but beguiling world where everyone speaks their mind but no-one pays any attention. If I said it was about journalism, international relations, nepatism, government, privilege, and philosophy you'd get totally the wrong idea, but it is. If I said it was firstly laugh-out-loud funny, secondly, a classic depiction of life for a certain class of people at a certain time in Britain and thirdly, based around an interesting set of observations I think I'd be getting closer to the truth. You see Waugh, I believe, didn't write about the answers to the injustices, or contradictions he saw. He just redrew them for his reader to make up his or her mind. Which is what I think you should do with Scoop. Remember, laugh first.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 11, 2010 12:53 PM BST


Scoop: A Novel About Journalists (Twentieth Century Classics)
Scoop: A Novel About Journalists (Twentieth Century Classics)
by Evelyn Waugh
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RUSH CHECKOUTWARD URGENT STOP, 6 Nov 2000
Waugh effortlessly sucked me into this barmy but beguiling world where everyone speaks their mind but no-one pays any attention. If I said it was about journalism, international relations, nepatism, government, privilege, and philosophy you'd get totally the wrong idea, but it is. If I said it was firstly laugh-out-loud funny, secondly, a classic depiction of life for a certain class of people at a certain time in Britain and thirdly, based around an interesting set of observations I think I'd be getting closer to the truth. You see Waugh, I believe, didn't write about the answers to the injustices, or contradictions he saw. He just redrew them for his reader to make up his or her mind. Which is what I think you should do with Scoop. Only laugh first.


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