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Tapping the Dream Tree (Newford)
Tapping the Dream Tree (Newford)
by C. de Lint
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.44

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Short Story Collection, 16 Dec 2004
I thoroughly enjoyed this collection of short stories the first time I read it, and continue to do so today. For those who've never read anything by this author, this book stands on its own nicely, with stories that will leave you thinking about them long after you've finished reading them. Many of the characters are individuals you'd want to know in real life, and the blending of urban life with magic and fantasy works very, very well. One of the best books I've read in a long time.


The Little Country
The Little Country
by Charles de Lint
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.50

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good Idea..., 16 Dec 2004
This review is from: The Little Country (Paperback)
I picked this novel up having read a number of other books by Charles De Lint, and although I haven't checked the detail, this novel reads like an early work. There are a number of good points about this novel; many of the characters, particularly the sub-characters, are given enough detail and contrast in their character to be interesting, one thing that always keeps me interested in a story. The individual chapters are well written, the novel is nicely paced and the premise behind it is thoroughly engaging. There are also downsides, though; the story moves between two distinct storylines that come together in the end, but tends to move between storylines far to frequently to be easily readable. Grouping the chapters together to create longer sections dealing with each storyling would've helped immensely. The central character is also not as believable as some of the other characters; how many folk singers are famous and possessed of good record deals at such an early age? On a very personal note, I know the area the novel is set in reasonably well, and given that the Men-an-Tol has actually been displaced at least once since it was originally created (damned Victorians!) its use in the novel didn't ring true for me. Whilst I enjoyed this book and I've re-read it a few times, it's not what I consider to be one of the author's best works.


The Onion Girl (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
The Onion Girl (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
by Charles de Lint
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A Haunting but Impressive Read, 16 Dec 2004
I read this novel having already read most of Charles De Lint's earlier works set in the imaginary city of Newford. This novel is well-written, although given that I'd managed to work out what was going to happen fairly early, I found the back-and-forth rhythm of the book a tad annoying. Given that I knew and was fond of the central character from the earlier books, this was a difficult read when you find out what dark history made her who she is. Saying that, all bar a small section of the book was completely new material, and it helped to flesh out a number of other characters well. The ending also surprised me a little. I'm glad I read it, but having read it once I'd find it difficult to read again. I think you'll get more out of the book if you've read at least one of the Newford novel or story collections before this, but even without that this is a powerful story.


Straight Silver (Warhammer 40000)
Straight Silver (Warhammer 40000)
by Dan Abnett
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable and well-written read, 7 Dec 2003
I wasn't sure that I would enjoy Straight Silver, even having read the previous Gaunt's Ghosts novels. I'm a little wary of any book based upon a product line, as it's all too easy for the book to simply become a promotion piece for this week's new items. In this case, my fears were completely groundless. Dan Abnett writes in an extremely readable fashion, and this novel adds more depth and detail to a number of the characters, particularly "Mad" Larkin. Set primarily amidst the chaos of a trench war with obvious parallels to World War One, the story doesn't get bogged down, unlike the troops involved. A particularly nice touch in this novel is the giant flightless bird based cavalry! The world this novel is set in is a refreshing chance from the usual high-tech Hiveworlds or low-tech, barbaric worlds common to novels from the Warhammer 40K. This novel manages to demonstrate nicely both the potential for advanced technology to alter the shape of a war, and the way poor-leadership and strategy can render such an advantage moot. I think anyone reading this one cold, without any knowledge of the 40K universe or any of the preceeding books, would have something of a hard time. For anyone who's read any of the earlier books, this is a must-read.


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