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Amnesiac
Amnesiac
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £5.55

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Memory Loss, 13 Feb. 2002
This review is from: Amnesiac (Audio CD)
Initially, it did take a few listens. And I was excited by some of the direction changes (even from Kid A), but it waned a little after the first 40 or 50 listens.
Then I heard "Pyramid Song" again, out of the blue, and this prompted another few listens. I saw them live in Belfast last year, also in Dublin the year before, and was blown away of course.
The problem is that a lot of "Amnesiac" benefits from a rethink, a live airing; the urbane digitized production techniques rendering some tracks flat as a pancake. "Like Spinning Plates" and "You And Whose Army" are shining lights played live, as is "Dollars & Cents". The intention of "Hunting Bears" I think, is edge and menace; only half of this intent comes across on record.
Although I get the theme of the album - a framented sense of the past desparately being pieced together in the present - and this is executed excellently, through an unsettling and disjointed listen, that feels incomplete when it ends, a little more space would benefit it's lasting appeal; a little more length, too.
It sounds unfinished, but I guess that's the point.


Hex
Hex
Offered by rbmbooks
Price: £100.88

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dog Man Stars!, 5 Feb. 2002
This review is from: Hex (Audio CD)
Just listening to "Cold House" by Hood put me in mind of this near-forgotten pioneer soundtrack. "The Winter Hit Hard" from said CD is pure Bark Psychosis - circa this album "Hex". Ghostly instrumentation, an undercurrent of menace through cold, lonely vistas. A post-rock bliss-out. They do ambient wonderfully on "Pendulum Man"; the seminal Talk Talk is recalled on "Absent Friend". But mostly, this is music taking another step into pastures new and uncharted, still sounding as relevant and vital (well to me anyway) as it did 9 years ago.
If you bought Cold House or Amnesiac last year, check this out, you may find some strands of similarity, and see how ahead of their time Bark Psychosis actually were.


Cold House
Cold House
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: £15.95

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pioneer Soundtracks, 5 Feb. 2002
This review is from: Cold House (Audio CD)
Hopefully this will provoke a revival for original, intelligent music-making. I'm sure a shift from ephemeral, hyped-up, next-best-retro-rock-designer bands is imminent. Pray Jesus!
A better album I have not heard in a good year ("Kid A"). A bit of a pastoral masterpiece, a la "Laughing Stock" and "Is This Desire?". Meloncholy yes, but beautiful and boundless. The electronic bounce of "You Show No Emotion At All", recalls "The Garden" by PJ Harvey and the wonderful "Euphoria" by Insides. Only once is old skool indie recalled, in "I Can't Find My Brittle Youth", the rest is a revelation to my sorely deprived post-rock ears.
The opening "... Removed All Trace..." and closing "You're Worth The Whold World" are stunning semi-hip hop stews. There's mad electronica on "...Sell Out(s)", whilst "Branches Bare" and "Lines Low To The Frozen Ground" simply shiver from the speakers.
Winter soundtracks.


Kid A
Kid A
Offered by TwoRedSevens
Price: £5.78

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Emotion Detector, 1 Feb. 2002
This review is from: Kid A (Audio CD)
The love/hate axis is generally persent in all pieces of real artistic breakthrough and Kid A is no different. A real artistic breakthrough; and what a joy it is. I have not heard a more perfectly rounded record... ever, I think. "Idioteque" is perfect pop. Perfectly modern. "Kid A" is simply a genius ballad/ambient hybrid; "Treefingers" sticks to the Eno ambient template, and this works between the crescendo of "How To Disappear Completely" and "Optimistic", the two conventional Radiohead moments here. "Everything In It's Right Place" has a warm a pillowy keyboard motif, and to be honest, the claims that this is a 'cold' recording are unfounded for me. I find it excitable and warm, hot even, in the pistons and squeaks of "Idioteque" - a pulsating Carnot engine of a track. "Kid A" drips with moisture like a spring thaw; the coda of warm synth-airwaves is pure sunglasses and beach material! Elsewhere, "In Limbo" is the sound of the undulating ocean, and me being washed up on a desert island. It's an album full of imagery. The final ascension of harps and ondes martenot is the snow-capped icing on the angelcake. Beauteous.


Someday My Blues Will Cover The Earth
Someday My Blues Will Cover The Earth
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: £10.69

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Praise thy name!, 28 Jan. 2002
What a gloriously sublime curveball Warren has delivered this time! As uncluttered with styles as "Fort Lake" is over-brimming with, utilizing this time a fabulously bluesy/noir pallette. It has a late night cozy feel mostly, but is just as warm blasting out of yer hi-fi. Lovetta is once again in fine voice and she excels with regret in "Our Last Affair"; with soul in "Solitude"; with uncertainty in "Are We Still Married?". All tracks are equally lovely. Buy it now.


1981 - 1998
1981 - 1998

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dead dead good, 5 Dec. 2001
This review is from: 1981 - 1998 (Audio CD)
Well, how they met... it's a cool story and a facinating outcome. One of the truly original groups of the last two decades, collected and compiled, redux/remastered etc. From undulating bass heavy drone-rock to joyous Renaissance fiddling... it's all here (well almost). For the purists, few notable "early years" exceptions (Ullyses, Persephone, Indoctrination?), but overall, it's faultless. And it's "lovingly" packaged, too. What more could a budding Pre-Raphaelite troubador ask for?


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