Profile for John Grandin > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by John Grandin
Top Reviewer Ranking: 6,043,033
Helpful Votes: 24

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
John Grandin (London)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The LEGO Movie
The LEGO Movie
Dvd
Offered by Lovefilm UK Limited
Price: £0.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Masterfully Built, 30 Sept. 2014
This review is from: The LEGO Movie (Blu-ray)
I laughed out loud every 5 minutes watching this outrageously entertaining movie. Brought out the kid in me and this adult hasn't stopped smiling since. Momentarily thought the ending was going to ruin it, but what looked like a schmaltz fest turned into one of the best killer gags to end any movie about childhood and building blocks.


About Time
About Time
Dvd
Offered by Lovefilm UK Limited
Price: £0.00

5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Crap, Actually, 3 Sept. 2014
This review is from: About Time (DVD)
Manipulating daddy's boy engineers a perfect life with the assistance of gender discretionary time travel and a script with plot holes wider than any continental shelf beneath the mid-Atlantic. Hideous.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 7, 2015 10:25 PM GMT


Icky Thump
Icky Thump
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £6.15

11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Stripes' Album Yet, 20 Jun. 2007
This review is from: Icky Thump (Audio CD)
After hearing the single Icky Thump, I was worried what the forthcoming album was likely to sound like, my ears having dropped off in disgust at the mangey discursiveness of the comeback seven inch. But with my lobes stapled back and with Icky Thump the album now going through its seventh or eighth listen, I'd just about say that it's the best new album I've heard since Noah moonwalked out of the Ark and high fived an octopus.

Every track on the album is strong. Even the opening track does it for me (now) simply because it works so well in conjunction with the rest of the album - a bit like a weird looking carving sat astride a totem pole of wonderful lookin' critters. From 'You Don't Know What Love Is' for fans of more straight forward chorus-verse-chrous sing-a-longs, to admirers of the raucously screamin' steeliness of Jack's slide guitar on 'Catch Hell Blues' (something we've not really heard since De Stijl), this album has everything a true WS fan could ever want in a new album. Mercy me, I even enjoyed the theatrical camposity of Conquest (surely 'I Think I Smell A Rat' goes Flamenco?) which, as fun as it is, isn't even nearly as engaging as 'Rag And Bone' where Jack and Meg adopt the guises of Mssers H. Steptoe and Son demanding all the junk from our outhouses (I have a few Coldplay CDs they can have) with Jack providing a cool, almost jazzy vibe which snoops along like a West London pimp before exploding into a glorious all-growling foot tappin' riff which wouldn't sound out of place sat on their first, punkiest album to date. But for this dilitante reviewer, 'I'm Slowly Turning Into You' has to be the highlight of the album: an almost at times Baroque combination of both organ and guitar; Jack's voice - as pained as a lemon with pips squeezed out; Meg's conversational vocals and background drums a perfect gyroscope whirling round and round as Jack's freestyling drops in and out of the track as if in homage the production values behind The Beatles' Tomorrow Never Knows - possibly. I won't tell you how good Little Cream Soda or 300 MPH Catch Hell Blues are, you'll have to find out for yourselves.

There's not one song on this album that I'd rate a duffer. For all that I adored Blue Orchid, it sits atop an album that simply did not live up to the rest of the WS back catalogue. Icky Thump does. More so, it outshines every album Jack n' Meg have ever released; and with Elephant and an out-and-out rock classic already, I wait with breath baited to see where in the pantheon of musical greatness Icky Thump gets placed.

Another cup of tea, anyone?


Here Come The Tears
Here Come The Tears
Price: £8.85

2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good album, great live too., 26 Oct. 2005
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
Actually, I saw The Tears last night at the Hammersmiuth Palais and even beforehand Bernard Butler was quite aimiably chatting to fans in the pub next door. It was that sort of laid back, student union-eaque sort of gig. It was almost emotional.


Here Come The Tears
Here Come The Tears
Price: £8.85

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Here Come the Cheers, 25 Oct. 2005
This review is from: Here Come The Tears (Audio CD)
Easily better than anything post DMS and arguably as good as the original 1995 denouement - Here Come the Tears is an album swept with begrudging jubiliation as Anderson & Butler come together to show us just what we've been missing all these years. Refugees, Imperfection and Beautiful Pain are the tallest, most delicious flames lapping our teaspoons of sallow hopelessness, but in truth there isn't a song on this album that isn't a bit of an intriguing, delightful tease. Anderson's nihilistically wistful lyrics are admitedly almost pantomime in scope, but without such faux-grandeur what basis would there be for Butler's guitar to juxtapose itself with a regal, if still twistily effete, air. Enjoy this album, it's certainly good enough to leave any avid Suede fan hungry for more. In the meantime, be polite to one another in the studio boys, for Music's sake!


Sweet Thames
Sweet Thames
by Matthew Kneale
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book so funny I needed to go to the toilet, 5 Sept. 2003
This review is from: Sweet Thames (Paperback)
There's not much I can say about this book apart from state that it has to be the funniest book that I've ever had the pleasure of reading.
The scenes in which Joshua Jeavons visits an artist friend of his and describes the artists's obvious inability to portray emotion in his subjects' faces is side-splitting. A tortured Christ like figure, nailed to a crucifix, his body covered in blood is observed as having all the expressive pathos of a man who has been mildly inconvenienced by the fact that he can't find his house keys. And there are so many more.
It's not a perfect book. The heigtened suspense you think you should feel as Joshua Jeavons' adventure unfolds never really materialises, at times the plot is nothing more than tiresome and the ending is rather flat. But the comedy! Oh, the comedy!


Page: 1