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Kooky (Scotland)

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Revell Leonardo Da Vinci Hydraulic Saw Wooden Kit
Revell Leonardo Da Vinci Hydraulic Saw Wooden Kit
Offered by JIMMYS DROP SHOP
Price: £25.49

2.0 out of 5 stars Looks OK but doesn't work, 2 Jan 2014
= Durability:2.0 out of 5 stars  = Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars  = Educational:4.0 out of 5 stars 
Da Vinci might have designed this but couldn't ever have built it otherwise he would have realised it couldn't work. The operation of the saw up and down is impossible. It looks good though and quite convincing if you don't try to turn the paddle wheel.


The Reality Dysfunction: 1/3 (Night's Dawn Trilogy)
The Reality Dysfunction: 1/3 (Night's Dawn Trilogy)
by Peter F. Hamilton
Edition: Paperback

4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Wood lovers only (read to see why), 19 Dec 2007
Peter Hamilton loves wood: he writes about a new colony planet where it's the only construction material; the colonists use it to build and power all their boats; another planet is pastoral and wants no technology so crave it for their horse drawn carts and tools; a star ship that travels between the two planets transports and trades it; and the captain has sex so many times he must be made of it! The story is huge, dense and branches so many times it's like a great tree, and the dialogue and characters are terribly wooden too. Ok, enough of the puns. I was deeply disappointed by this book - the first Hamilton I've read, and the last too. I gave up reading it properly about 700 pages in and started speed reading to see what the fabled "reality dysfunction" actually is. It's not until after page 950 that it's finally mentioned. Before that we get zombies, psychics, mysticism, religion, sex (gay and straight), torture, lots of horror, and small snippets of actual sci-fi though little of it hasn't originated elsewhere (much of the story lines have been pulled from Star Trek TOS including creatures made of energy and a bed-hopping captain). I give it three stars because it has entertained me occasionally, and if I vote now it'll get a better score then when I finally get to the end of the book and am far less charitable.


Magic Moving Images: Animated Optical Illusions
Magic Moving Images: Animated Optical Illusions
by Colin Ord
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simple but amazing, 22 May 2007
The visual effect demonstrated in this little book to animate images on each page is stunning in its simplicity and effectiveness. The illusion of movement generated by just sliding a plastic sheet over each page is perfect. With a wide variety of subjects, from gears to galloping horses, DNA to dolphins, there's something to thrill and amaze every reader. A perfect gift for any occasion.


The Origin of Species (Classics of World Literature)
The Origin of Species (Classics of World Literature)
by Charles Darwin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.99

42 of 81 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good for historians, but not for modern learning, 19 Feb 2003
After reading the excelent "Darwin: a Life in Science" by Michael White & John Gribbin I decided to read Origin of Species to see what all the fuss is about. I was disappointed. Most Darwin biographies cover the important parts of Species and I found I already knew the main topics, but ploughed on through Darwin's verbose and lengthy text trying to find anything else of interest. There are a few gems but they are very hard to uncover, the style being somewhat archaic with Darwin taking an age to get to his point. He provides numerous examples to support his case for evolution, but he relies too heavily on the reader having as much understanding of technical terms as he, and fails to provide evidential details siting lack of space many times (perhaps because the printing of photographs was too difficult at the time - a single graph is all we are given). I certainly agree with the historical perspective that this book was never intended by Darwin to be his main treatise on evolution; that this was a rush job to gain recognition before Wallace, and was to be followed by a much greater volume giving in detail his research. Where the book really comes to life is when Darwin explains how his ideas are in direct competition with those of Creatonists, and when he shoots down their ideas with his evolutionary logic.
For those wishing to learn the details of evolutionary theory I would suggest they avoid this book and instead read a modern guide - it will be based on Darwin's ideas so you won't be missing anything. Anyone else who wants to know how the science started should give it a go, but be prepared for lots of page skipping and speed reading.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 18, 2010 8:24 AM BST


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