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IntensiveCareNurse "IntensiveCareNurse" (UK)
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Varilight 20w Switch Dimmable BC22 Bulb = 100w Incandescant
Varilight 20w Switch Dimmable BC22 Bulb = 100w Incandescant

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good solution technology, but shop around..., 1 Dec. 2012
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

Please ensure you shop around, as these are under £5 elsewhere on Amazon....!

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs (different makes all use the same technology) have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each (Hint: LOOK AROUND elsewhere on Amazon) and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying & from the lowest priced seller), these were also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly (AT THE RIGHT PRICE, THAT IS). I repeat, shop around...


VARILIGHT 20watt BC B22 Bayonet Cap Equivalent to 100watt Switch Dimming Spiral
VARILIGHT 20watt BC B22 Bayonet Cap Equivalent to 100watt Switch Dimming Spiral
Offered by The Lightbulb Company
Price: £11.39

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good solution technology, but shop around..., 1 Dec. 2012
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs (different makes all use the same technology) have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each (Hint: LOOK AROUND elsewhere on Amazon) and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying & from the lowest priced seller), these were also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly (AT THE RIGHT PRICE, THAT IS). I repeat, shop around...


Varilight - Switch Dimmable Energy Saving Lamp with Bayonet Fitting - YCA20S-B22
Varilight - Switch Dimmable Energy Saving Lamp with Bayonet Fitting - YCA20S-B22
Offered by 1StopElectrics
Price: £3.00

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good solution technology, but shop around..., 1 Dec. 2012
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs (different makes all use the same technology) have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each (Hint: LOOK AROUND elsewhere on Amazon) and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying & from the lowest priced seller), these were also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly (AT THE RIGHT PRICE, THAT IS). I repeat, shop around...
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 18, 2013 8:52 AM GMT


TWIN PACK 20w (= 100w) Spiral Low Energy Saving Light Bulb Spiral CFL Lamp ES e27 Screw Cap High Power Low Energy Saver 20watt Light Bulb Flicker Free CFL Compact Fluorescent - 20w Equivalent to 100watt standard GLS Lamp "A" Energy Rated Edison Screw Cap e27 Non-Dimmable
TWIN PACK 20w (= 100w) Spiral Low Energy Saving Light Bulb Spiral CFL Lamp ES e27 Screw Cap High Power Low Energy Saver 20watt Light Bulb Flicker Free CFL Compact Fluorescent - 20w Equivalent to 100watt standard GLS Lamp "A" Energy Rated Edison Screw Cap e27 Non-Dimmable

4.0 out of 5 stars Good solution technology, but shop around..., 1 Dec. 2012
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

Please be aware, this self same technology can be purchased elsewhere on Amazon for under a fiver...

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs (different makes all use the same technology) have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each (Hint: LOOK AROUND elsewhere on Amazon) and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying & from the lowest priced seller), these were also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly (AT THE RIGHT PRICE, THAT IS). I repeat, shop around...


SWITCH DIMMABLE Energy-Saving Spiral Switch Dimmable 20watts (100w Equivalent) BC / B22 Warm White Dimmable Energy Saving Spiral B22 Light Bulb NOT SUITABLE FOR USE WITH A DIMMER SWITCH. Switch Dimmable contains its own dimmer - so use with a conventional light switch.
SWITCH DIMMABLE Energy-Saving Spiral Switch Dimmable 20watts (100w Equivalent) BC / B22 Warm White Dimmable Energy Saving Spiral B22 Light Bulb NOT SUITABLE FOR USE WITH A DIMMER SWITCH. Switch Dimmable contains its own dimmer - so use with a conventional light switch.

5.0 out of 5 stars Good solution technology, but shop around..., 1 Dec. 2012
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs (different makes all use the same technology) have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each (Hint: LOOK AROUND elsewhere on Amazon) and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying & from the lowest priced seller), these were also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly (AT THE RIGHT PRICE, THAT IS). I repeat, shop around...


Sylvania Energy Saving Spiral Switch Dimmable 10,000 Hour 20w (100w Equivalent) ES / E27 / Edison Screw Cap Warmwhite
Sylvania Energy Saving Spiral Switch Dimmable 10,000 Hour 20w (100w Equivalent) ES / E27 / Edison Screw Cap Warmwhite
Price: £11.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good solution technology, but shop around..., 1 Dec. 2012
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs (different makes all use the same technology) have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each (Hint: LOOK AROUND elsewhere on Amazon) and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying & from the lowest priced seller), these were also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly (AT THE RIGHT PRICE, THAT IS). I repeat, shop around...


Edison 20w Spiral Low Energy Saving Light Bulb *** FREE UK SHIPPING *** CFL Lamp Standard Bayonet Cap B22 20w - Equivalent to over 100w. Energy-Saving Spiral Switch Dimmable 20w (100w Equivalent) BC / B22 Warm White NOT SUITABLE FOR USE WITH A DIMMER SWITCH. Switch Dimmable contains its own dimmer - so use with a conventional light switch
Edison 20w Spiral Low Energy Saving Light Bulb *** FREE UK SHIPPING *** CFL Lamp Standard Bayonet Cap B22 20w - Equivalent to over 100w. Energy-Saving Spiral Switch Dimmable 20w (100w Equivalent) BC / B22 Warm White NOT SUITABLE FOR USE WITH A DIMMER SWITCH. Switch Dimmable contains its own dimmer - so use with a conventional light switch

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent & Cheap solution., 29 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
OK, these "switch" controlled dimming bulbs are controlled in a slightly unorthodox way, but that really is the only negative that you can level at them considering that all you need to do is plug them in & you're away.

NB: This particular seller offered the cheapest price for this bulb at under a fiver at the time of my purchase... Bravo! & despite different branding they are all EXACTLY the same technology.

When (on the other hand) considering fitting low energy dimmable bulbs designed for a rotary or touch dimmer switch, there really are a few things you have to take account of first... (& I only include this info to underline the convenience of the product under review... apologies to the initiated):

1) You cannot just fit dimmable bulbs (ones that work with an actual dimmer switch) without ensuring that you also have a compatible dimmer switch fitted.
Existing conventional dimmer switches typically have a rating anywhere between 40 and 400 watts (to manage conventional bulbs which are 40 watts or above). If you try to use an existing dimmer switch rated at this wattage, you are likely to either blow the dimmable bulb (which will be typically rated at 20w or below) or (at best) have flicker at mid to low dimness setting.
This is why so many complain of "flicker" with this type of bulb.
You are only likely to have a compatible dimmer switch already fitted if that circuit has previously been fitted or modified to manage low energy dimmable bulbs. Unscrewing one from the wall will confirm this if in doubt.
An appropriate dimmer switch is one in which the entire bulb load for that circuit sits within its watts rating range [IE a 0-120w dimmer will manage a circuit of anything from a single 1w bulb up to 6 x 20w bulbs (120w)].
2) A low energy dimmer switch meeting the requirements of your low energy bulb(s) total wattage will cost £10 at the very cheapest. Dimmable bulbs designed to work with this switch cost around £7 & above.
3) If you are fitting a dimmer to a circuit that contains 2 switches (share a common circuit), you also need to ensure that the low energy dimmer has a push on/0ff (not turn on/off) switch.
All this amounts to a minimum cost of £17 to create 1 single bulb low energy dimmer switched circuit... Thats a lot of money if you plan to convert the whole house.
4) I do have a low energy 9 bulb LED dimmer circuit (controlled by dimmer switch) in my kitchen, and the range of dimming is quite disappointing (probably only between 50% and 100% at best with quite a low lighting level at full whack).

Comparitively, these switch dimmable bulbs have the following advantages:

1) They cost under a fiver each and are fitted in a jiffy without messing. You just screw them in (if you already have standard on/off switches) & you're done.
2) If, on the other hand, you need to change an existing dimmer switch to a standard on/off switch to work with these bulbs (as I did in 3 different rooms), they only cost a quid each delivered (check out another four letter word auction site).
That's just £6 max per single bulb circuit.
3) The mode of operation might sound fiddly (please see the other positive reviews for this item, as it is well explained elsewhere), but it quickly becomes second-nature & is nearly as simple as using a dimmer switch anyway.
4) 20w max equals 100w comparable light output (although I would reckon more like 80-90w in reality, which is still very bright). All low energy bulb manufacturers (I find) tend to exaggerate their comparable brightness levels a little...
5) In comparison to my prior experience of bulbs dimmed by a dimmer switch, the dimming range is far, far better with these switch dimmables (easily 5% to 100%).

All in all, they are a very easy & cheap solution to fully controllable & low energy lighting.
At a shilling short of a fiver a shot (at the time of buying, that is), these are also the cheapest anywhere (and I looked just about everywhere)!
Recommended unreservedly.


3.5mm Speaker and headphone Splitter
3.5mm Speaker and headphone Splitter
Offered by Ev day
Price: £0.75

5.0 out of 5 stars Cost & delivery less than UK 2nd class mail!!!, 20 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
So this cost me 64p including delivery from China!
Works well at splitting a single stereo output to two stereo outputs, with no loss in sound quality.
I note looking at some of the reviews here that it used to cost quite a bit more for both the item & P&P (as a postage fee has been charged in the past)
If someone had posted it to me 2nd class from my home town, the postage alone would have cost 69p (the package would class as a "large letter" due to its thickness)...
The splitter is of good quality, and does the job well.
Okay, so it took 16 days... but 64p all-in??? Now that really is a bargain.
You are not going to beat this value if you are prepared to wait a while for it to arrive...

PS: Cripes, it's gone up to one whole quid (delivered) now!


Kryptonite Evolution Series 4 Standard Lock with EZMount Bracket
Kryptonite Evolution Series 4 Standard Lock with EZMount Bracket
Offered by Bike Champions
Price: £42.85

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best Sub £35 Shackle Out There..., 20 Nov. 2012
I spent far too much time researching reviews & opinions of shackle locks in order to find the best value (yes, Im a bit of a tight-wad), most reliable and most secure one out there, so am passing this on for others.
Spending anything under £45 on a shackle lock, you will always find the odd criticism.
Perusing the reviews here, it seems a few complain that water easily gets into this lock and causes problems with the key turning in the barrel. Having said that, I would definitely advise dousing any lock mechanism in WD40 once a week if using it in wet conditions.
Comparing this to reviews of other Sold Secure locks, this does seem to be a common problem (just check out the reviews for the Onguard Pitbull & Street Fortnum locks, for examples). Most of the other shackle locks suffer a stiff & dodgy key action straight out of the package (if reviews are to be believed). Because of this, the Evolution actually rates a lot better than those generally.
Another complaint as concerns the evolution is heavy weight... By definition a stronger lock is likely be heavier & Id rather carry an extra pound of weight around than walk home after someone nicks my bike.
It therefore seems that it is nearly impossible to attain the perfect shackle without dipping into your life savings. Having said that, for under £35 the Evolution does seem to offer the very best value as far as a sold secure gold lock for under £35. Why do I think this?;

1) There are only 2 Sold Secure gold bicycle shackles for this kind of money (this one & the Masterlock Street Fortum). The Masterlock shackle, however, has very poor reviews re reliability & outright security. I actually tried the Street Fortnum initially, and sent it back as the lock was graunchy & stiff straight out of the wrapper! Please see mine (and others) reviews of the Fortnum here on Amazon.
2) This lock is exceptionally strong for the money (has a very impressive tonnage pull breaking point).
3) The lock action (key/tumblers) is exceptionally smooth (at least mine is) & I intend to keep it that way by dosing it with WD40 when it gets wet. The keys look & feel solid & well made. There is a light fitted to one of the 3 keys (a blue & funky beam too).
4) It simply looks the business (a strong looking lock is a deterrant in itself).
5) The bike mounting system is the best I have seen, although some reviewers complain the LS version... not this one... won't fit their particular bike (I advise you size it to your bike first if the mount is important to you). My LS version (slightly longer than the standard one advertised here) only fits on the front handlebar stem of my folding bicycle, for example, although Im happy to sacrifice street-cred over practicality. The adjustable fitting will go around MOST sizes & types of tube crossection (circular, or egg shaped... you name it), the only real restriction being the size of the space needed to mount the shackle there. It's importantr to only buy the minimum length shackle lock you need (as any empty spaces within the "D" of the lock make the job easier for thieves). I needed the longer one to fasten 2 bikes, not 1 (you can find it elsewhere for a similar price on Amazon).
Although the bicycle mount is made of plastic, it is of good quality & I doubt it should fail unless seriously abused (it may crack over time). The lock coupling point is a very heavy duty aluminium flange. There is a clever "trigger" that locks the lock in place on the frame.
As long as the allen bolt is tightened to secure the aluminium flange firmly on the shackle, the mounted lock is totally rock steady when mounted on a bike in use... Other shackles really do have far worse mounting systems, the one on the Street Fortnum beiung complete trash (just check out the reviews).

PS: If wanting something slightly cheaper, the Kryptonite Kryptolok LS is (supposedly) almost as strong but a little lighter.


TELECAM TCE2000 High performance UHF indoor TV aerial
TELECAM TCE2000 High performance UHF indoor TV aerial
Offered by Ryness Lighting & Electrical
Price: £19.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great for caravans..., 12 Nov. 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was really suprised with the performance of this little aerial for my caravan.
As expected it did initially struggle actually INSIDE the caravan, as my caravan is a steel skeleton, aluminimum sheet body Eriba (quite a challenge for an indoor aerial, as all that metalwork heavily deflects the signal)... I don't think that standard make caravans will have the same problem, though.
As it is also a pop-top caravan however, the aerial can just be put directly onto the caravan roof through the pop-top fabric window... This technically converts it from an indoor to an outdoor aerial I know, but does (especially in my case) massively improve reception. This could conceivably be achieved in other caravans via a roof light/vent if the cable length is increased (or simply from the outside amplified socket).
With the local strong signal strength, I then found it to perform nearly as well as my full size mast-mounted high gain aerial, getting 98% of the channels (I struggled with ITV3 for some reason) without interference & without initially amplifying/boosting the signal.
If the Ricability website is to be believed, the signal amplifier version of this aerial doesn't actually perform any better... I do suspect that this reflects the poor quality of the in-buit amplifier on that model, as when I connected this aerial to my caravan 12 volt signal amplifier I could then view ALL the channels with the aerial actually WITHIN my steel/alu walled caravan (& with the pop-top fully closed)!!! That definitely proves that this aerial does benefit from a decent quality amplifier (and also suggests that this aerial amplified & on the roof of my caravan would also perform well in weak signal areas).
It does seem to be a fabulous little aerial. I will bench test it in various campsite locations, and report back here if it fails to live up to its reputation...
I hope to end up with enough faith in it to be able to leave my massive caravan aerial & mounting poles in the shed.

There are only two negatives:
1) It is very cheaply made (it would easily break) & the base is pretty unstable. This deservedly loses it a star.
2) The price... OK, they have definitely got the design right here, but there isn't much to it for the money. I guess when you gain the Which "best buy" status, you can charge a little over the odds...


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