Profile for C. P. Hennessy > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by C. P. Hennessy
Top Reviewer Ranking: 645,545
Helpful Votes: 18

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
C. P. Hennessy "Pete Hennessy" (Oxford, UK)
(REAL NAME)   

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
Whirlpool Max Microwave with Steam Function - Silver
Whirlpool Max Microwave with Steam Function - Silver
Price: £120.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's only a microwave - but I really like it!, 3 Jun. 2013
I never thought I would review a microwave! But this one deserves it, it is just so much simpler and more convenient for simple reheating than any other microwave I have ever seen.

We use the microwave for simple reheating or defrosting and for simplicity this microwave is brilliant. There is a single touch button that puts it on for 30 seconds, touch it twice for a minute, 4 times for 2 minutes etc. Other buttons allow a range of options, but apart from the off button I've not used the rest of them since the first week.

Secondly, they have put the engine underneath the plate rather than beside it. This makes it slimmer and less boxy. It really looks a lot better than the standard shape. It isn't cheap, but compared to the other costs in a fitted kitchen I think the price is OK.

My one complaint is that the space inside should be higher. There is about 14.5 cm between the plate (which is full sized) and the ceiling, so it is awkward/impossible to put in anything taller than about 13cm.


Canoeing the Congo: First Source to Sea Descent of the Congo River
Canoeing the Congo: First Source to Sea Descent of the Congo River
by Phil Harwood
Edition: Paperback

13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Incredible Journey by an Inspiring Man!, 9 Dec. 2012
If the river Congo had been in other (easier) countries this would still have been an epic adventure, but combined with the local lawlessness and corruption it is absolutely astonishing. The author, Phil, writes well and describes both the generosity and warmth of many of the local fisherman as well as the occasional aggression and hate of some people and intimidation and corruption from violent officials. He takes it all in his stride (well, losing his rag a fair few times). His self confidence is phenomenal, as is his belief in the goodness of others.

Just the length of the journey - 5 months alone or with a local, in such a potentially hostile environment is hard. By the end Phil is obviously suffering a little mentally, but as he says at the start of the book, facing adversity strengthens us. He had a huge amount of adversity and the book shows his strength.

He mentions Blood River (by Tim Butcher). Tim is not nearly so adventurous, but his book does give a better description of why the Democratic Republic of Congo is in the state that it is in. I recommend both books for different reasons, but this is the most inspiring!

Thanks Phil!


The Attendant's Tale
The Attendant's Tale
Price: £3.78

5.0 out of 5 stars A good read for men too!, 8 Oct. 2012
I really enjoyed this book and I just wanted to add in the reviews that this book works for men too. It is about love and relationships, but not in a way that put me off.

I read the book several weeks ago and still remember the characters well, as if they were people I had actually met some time ago. Although if I had met them I would never have got to know them so well.

Thank you!


Africa: A Biography of the Continent
Africa: A Biography of the Continent
by John Reader
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Africa from molten rock to modern politics - astounding, 8 Oct. 2012
I am astonished by this book! It really does start with the formation of the African continent continue with the evolution of life into humans, then on through human history on the continent, slavery and colonialism ending with modern African states, Nelson Mandela and the Rwandan Genocide.

I would have thought it an impossible task to put recent African history into so much context, but the book manages it. I know a little geology and the book covered that aspect perfectly. I knew very little anthropology and the book coped with that too. On contentious issues the author covers both sides of an argument before going in further depth into his preferred explanation.

It is quite a heavy read for a non-academic, it took me a few months, but it was worth it. I can't recommend it too much.


Emergence of Broadcasting in Britain
Emergence of Broadcasting in Britain
by Brian Anthony Hennessy
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Available from John Hennessy, 24 Dec. 2011
This review is written on behalf of John Hennessy, who edited and published this book for his brother Brian. The book is available from John Hennessy at Southerleigh, Church Road, Lympstone, Devon EX8 5JT. 01395 224223
"It is the best background to broadcasting history I have ever seen. (It) could be a basis for the BBC's 80th. anniversary celebrations in 2006."
Trevor Hill, former Assistant Head, BBC Network Radio North.

The beginning of any great enterprise should be recorded for posterity. Few knew that the Children's Hour `Uncles', Arthur, Jeff and Caractacus, were also the engineers who struggled by day to develop technical equipment - and would soon become Assistant Controller, Station Director and Organiser of Programmes for the BBC.

This is a very human account, from the dawn of radio to the attainment of a Royal Charter in the late 1920s. It tells of the struggles and frustrations of individuals in developing innovative equipment and of the great John Reith who battled with everyone to bring the BBC from a staff of four up to a Corporation of several hundred.

Brian Hennessy's book also describes the development of broadcasting equipment, the search for premises and looming bankruptcy before ending with the emergence of a firmly established Chartered Corporation, the BBC.

Meticulous research over many years and interviews with several of those who were there at the time make this a valuable and original work for those involved in media studies, for radio enthusiasts or simply for those interested in radio and the fascinating story of the emergence of broadcasting.

Brian Hennessy's career involved much patient, detailed research relating to historic towns and he brought these qualities to bear in writing of The Emergence of Broadcasting, patiently tracking down people who were there, not wanting our heritage to be lost. His book was edited by John Hennessy, a chartered electronic engineer and Fellow of the Institution of Electrical Engineers, where a major part of the action took place.


Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart
Blood River: A Journey to Africa's Broken Heart
by Tim Butcher
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Easily read yet deep and satisfying, 18 Nov. 2009
The title of the book left me cold, but I had been given it by a friend so I started to read it anyway.

I was very impressed! It is more than a simple travel story, Tim uses the narrative of his journey to tell the history of the Congo from the time of Stanley (only 140 years ago), through the brutal colonial period, the incompetence (and evil) of the Mbutu regime to the present anarchy where grandparents who were educated in normal cities now live with grandchildren who have never seen a motorbike or car.

His respect for the normal people of the Congo - and especially the local Aid workers who helped him - really comes through.

The book is the result of the combination of a good author with a deep knowledge of the history of the Congo and an exciting travel adventure. I highly recommend it.


Tall Stories: Andy Jackson a Biography
Tall Stories: Andy Jackson a Biography
by Ronald Cameron
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very well written account of an amazing person, 25 Jan. 2009
What has really surprised me with this book is how well written it is! I met Andy Jackson just twice, but that was enough to know he was an outstanding character as well as a world class paddler. I got the book in his memory, because I like tales of extreme kayaking and because the royalties go to charities. I knew there would be some good stories and amazing photos, but I didn't expect that the quality of the writing by Andy's ex-landlord (Ronald Cameron) could combine so powerfully with contemporary articles written by Andy and his friends to produce such a readable and vivid account of his life.

By the end of the book I was so glad that the world had known Andy Jackson and intensely sad that he died so soon. The last chapter is truly emotional. I am also very glad that Ronald has managed to pass on the message of his life so well, and I would recommend this book to anyone who has ever paddled whitewater at any level, or even spent any time in wild hills and mountains.


Page: 1