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Hantek® 1008C Digital Oscilloscope DAQ 8CH Programmable Generator 2.4MSa/s 12Bits Auto Ignition Probe CE
Hantek® 1008C Digital Oscilloscope DAQ 8CH Programmable Generator 2.4MSa/s 12Bits Auto Ignition Probe CE
Offered by Barsoom.eu
Price: £69.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Product good, instructions hopeless, 1 Dec 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a neat PC based oscilloscope with automotive functions for analysis of ignition, charging, starting functions etc , and it comes with about 7 leads including an inductive pickup. No software was included with it, despite the instructions saying that a CD came with it , and I had to download this from the Hantek website, which was not all that easy to do , put it on a USB stick , and then install it. The scope works alright , even on a small laptop, but, and it is a big but, the instructions are of the most basic kind and most importantly, make no reference at all to the automotive function . I have tried searching on line for them, without any success at all . Thus I have had to guess what leads to select, what to connect to where, how to deal with vehicles with positive earth etc , what selections as to time and amplitude to make, how to use the recording function , and I have not been able to use most of the functions . With proper instructions this would be good value, but without them its useability is very questionable


Landscape Trilogy: The Autobiography of L.T.C. Rolt
Landscape Trilogy: The Autobiography of L.T.C. Rolt
by L T C Rolt
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.84

5.0 out of 5 stars Memories of a different world, 12 Oct 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This book is a compilation of all 3 parts of Tom Rolt's autobiographical survey of our industrial and engineering past . Rolt, born in 1910 , spent his life pottering with engineering projects . He undertook an apprenticeship with a steam locomotive builder in the late 1920s/early 1930s and acquired a lifelong love of machinery of all kinds, particularly that powered by steam. A founder member of the Vintage Sports Car Club, of the Inland Waterways Association ( by whom he was later to be shamefully treated ) , and of the Tal-y-llyn Railway Preservation Society , he gave of his time freely to all 3 pursuits and for about 11 years lived on his Narrow Boat Cressy, whilst at the same time writing a large collection of books, often dealing with industrial history . Some were extremely successful, and but others were failures . He met both situations with aplomb and a philosophical outlook on life . Politically liberal with a small L , he campaigned both for the betterment of the working man's way of life , and for the maintenance of the industries which provided the working man with a living , whether on the land, on the waterways, or in the factories . This book reflects his views on life and his enthusiasm for permanent qualities rather than the transitory way of life as we now know it, and is to be recommended highly as a very readable and nostalgic survey of what was valuable in British life post the Industrial Revolution


MINI: The True and Secret History of the Making of a Motor Car
MINI: The True and Secret History of the Making of a Motor Car
by Simon Garfield
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

2.0 out of 5 stars Interesting but full of inaccuracies, 26 Sep 2013
Yet another book which badly needed an editor who knew something about the subject. The interviewer plainly relied on the accuracy of recollection of his interviewees, and sadly it is very clear that in one or two cases age had affected this badly. Thus the man who says that carburettor icing resulted from the pre-production 180 degree change of position of the engine ( rather than being the cause of the change ) is talking rubbish, and a knowledgeable interviewer and editor would have picked this up, particularly as a more reliable source makes this point in the page preceding the one in question . The same interviewee contends that he travelled to Sweden in 1961 on a BEA Vickers Viking . The Viking had been retired from BEA Service some 8 years or so before that, and it is likely that he meant a Viscount. In the same vein, p.109 has a photo of a Mini going aboard " a jet plane". In fact it is a Bristol Freighter , a lovely aeroplane but about as removed from the concept of a jet plane as it is possible to get.There are later references to a man called Pat Nolan who it is implied was at Morris at Cowley, but it seems pretty clear that in fact he was at Pressed Steel Fisher at Cowley, since references to his working on Rover P6, Sunbeam Rapier, Hillman Minx, Rolls Royce - none of which were BMC products - are made . The criticism that others have made of more than half the book being devoted to the BMW era is also well justified, and makes a mockery of the subtitle on the cover " The True and Secret History of the Making of a Motor Car" with a picture of the Mini publicity shots below it. That having been said, some of the interviewees are very interesting, particularly Alex Moulton who was one of the designers of the revolutionary rubber suspension , but overall, the book is one where a good author would have made it worth reading, but where its deficiencies are too glaring to make it good value


So You Think You Know About Britain?
So You Think You Know About Britain?
by Danny Dorling
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Potentially interesting, but incoherent, 11 Oct 2012
This book had the potential to be of great interest , but it badly needed a well-read editor who could have made the author concentrate on the substance of his argument and avoid the windy rhetoric which pervades the book after the first couple of sections. The polemical aspects become repetitious in the extreme , and it becomes difficult , if not impossible, to divine just what point it was the writer wanted to make in any given context. It all smacks of a badly written first year essay , which is a shame because somewhere in the dross there is a decent argument trying to get out


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