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Picasso (Dover Fine Art, History of Art)
Picasso (Dover Fine Art, History of Art)
by Gertrude Stein
Edition: Paperback
Price: 8.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Gertrude Stein writes o Picasso, 11 Nov 2013
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Art critic Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) writes on Picasso (1881-1946). The diminutive and small format paperback is an unabridged republication of the work originally published in 1938 with the sole difference that 8 of the 61 plates in the original publication were reproduced in color while in the present 1984 edition all plates are reproduced in black and white. The book comprise 50 pages of text plus whole page reproduction for each plate, admittedly of poor quality, on poor quality paper. The last plate dated 1938 but Guernica completed in 1937 is conspicuously absent. The artist outlived the original publication by 35 years and consequently and of necessity the book could not portray a holistic picture of the life and oeuvre of the artist.

Having pointed the flaws and limitations of the book it would be grossly unfair not to mention its definite merit. I completed reading the little book in a single sitting and found the text seductive.

For a whole generation in the first part of the twentieth century Gertrude Stein's house was the meeting place of a glittering array of artists and writers which included Picasso and the distinguished art critic had an intimate knowledge and relation with the iconic painter.

Her writing as I experienced it in reading the book was sharp, incisive, and original.

The book evolves naturally in a chronological sequence.

It commences with the blue period of the artist which with its somberness is imbued with his Spanish roots. It is followed by the rose period (1904-1906) which reflects his joyous Parisian experience, the period ends with the portrait of Gertrude Stein in 1906 which graces the cover of the book. It is followed by the exposure of the artist to African art which served as an inspiration for the creation of 'Les Demoiselles D'Avignon' also in 1906. Then follows the agonizing but creative period of his artistic genius leading to Cubism, a path followed by Derain and Braque. Stein acutely observes that a creator is not in advance of his generation but he is the first of his contemporaries to be conscious of what is happening to his generation. In Cubism, Picasso captures the nature, essence, and spirit of the twentieth century. The art critic describes the period following World War I between 1918-1927 as the second rose period following his joyous experience in Italy and the staging of the Parade - the culmination of Cubism. This period is characterized by a return to realistic painting with the first painting, the portrait of his wife and culminating with the portrait of his son dressed as harlequin in 1927. There is somewhere in this period the calligraphic painting inspired by his native Spain and the impact on Spain of Arab culture and calligraphy.

In conclusion a flawed little book but with an unmistakable touch of brilliance.


The Epigenetics Revolution: How Modern Biology is Rewriting Our Understanding of Genetics, Disease and Inheritance
The Epigenetics Revolution: How Modern Biology is Rewriting Our Understanding of Genetics, Disease and Inheritance
by Nessa Carey
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Epigenetics: phenomenology and molecular underpinning, 8 Nov 2013
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The book is masterly in its treatment of this young, exciting, and profoundly significant field of biological research. The author's writing is clear, substantive, vivid, acutely insightful in matters relating to evolution, witty while her frequent use of analogy exemplary. In the course of the book, the author revisits topics in varying contexts but far from this being repetitious on the contrary it refreshes and embeds concepts in the mind of the reader and enhances its interconnection. Another positive element in the book is that on several instances there is a pictorial illustration of the issue raised by the author so that the reader has the benefit to visually follow the sequence of events on the issue raised. I have, however, to warn the prospective reader that the preceding notwithstanding the book is intrinsically not an easy read due to its conceptual richness, the multiplicity, subtlety, intricate sequence of interactions and the complexity of the epigenetic code - especially as related to histone modifications as opposed to DNA methylation - much of it presently understood only in broad outline.

Until the turn of the century DNA was viewed as a blueprint or a template but since then there was a paradigm shift and we now correctly view it as a script and as such identical starting points may lead to different outcomes. It is possible without change in DNA (mutation) for life histories to be changed irrevocably in response to the environment through epigenetic changes in our genome.

We infer that a phenomenon is likely to be influenced by epigenetic alterations in DNA and its accompanying proteins if one or both of the following are met: two things are genetically identical, but phenotypically variable; an organism continues to be influenced by an event long after the initiating event has occurred.

Since all phenotypic variation has a physical basis, we can define epigenetics at the molecular level as the set of modifications to our genetic material that change the ways of gene expression - switch on, switch off, or some intermediate stage - but which does not alter our genome which we can transmit in all its purity to our descendants.

The above also solved the mystery that only 2 per cent of our genome codes for proteins while 98 per cent does not code for proteins but as we now realize codes for something else which is connected with regulating gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. We have similarly come to the realization that the complexity of living organisms scales much better with the percentage that does not code for proteins than it does with the number of base pairs coding for proteins. Further it has been argued that the difference between humans and our chimpanzee relatives may well be due to a special class of ncRNA (non coding RNA) which has an immense capacity of editing itself.

Evolution seems to have solved the problem of creating more complex and sophisticated organisms by altering the regulation of the organisms than altering the proteins themselves. And this is exactly what has been achieved by using complicated networks of ncRNAs molecules to influence how, when and to what degree specific proteins are expressed.

I shall now reconnect to an earlier part of the review to present epigenetics in action both when two individuals are genetically identical but phenotypically different and when individuals continue to be influenced by an event long after the initiating event has occurred.

The scientific term for identical twins is monozygotic (MZ)twins. They were both derived from the same single-cell zygote formed from the fusion of one egg and one sperm. (MZ) twins allow us to explore mathematically the link between the sequences of our genes (genotype) and what we are like (phenotype). In genetically identical monozygotic twins, the concordance for schizophrenia does not reach 100 per cent but is only 50 per cent.

The Dutch Hunger Winter lasted from the start of November 1944 to the late spring of 1945. The effects of the famine on the birth weights of children who had been in the womb during that terrible period were: if a mother was well-fed around the time of conception and malnourished only for the last few months few months of the pregnancy, her baby was likely to be small. If, on the other hand, the mother suffered malnutrition for the first three moths of the pregnancy, but then was well fed, she was likely to have a baby with a normal body weight. But then came the really surprising:babies who were born small tended to stay small all their lives - even though they were properly nourished - with lower obesity rates than the general population. Even more unexpectedly, the children whose mothers had been malnourished only early in pregnancy, had higher obesity rates than normal. And the truly stunning, some of these effects seem to be present in the children of this group, that is the grandchildren of women who were malnourished during the first three months of their pregnancy. Something suggesting Lamarckian inheritance and this is indeed what happened and has a name 'transgenerational inheritance'. But I want to reassure the reader because in the overwhelming number of cases, Darwinian evolution prevails.

A child, less than three years old, is abused and neglected by his parents but subsequently is treated normally. Often such children who suffered from abuse or neglect in their early years have substantially higher risk as adults of mental health problems than the general population. All too often the child grows up into an adult at high risk of depression, self harm, alcohol and drug abuse, and suicide.

We shall now turn our attention to the epigenetic modifications at the molecular level which influence gene and protein expression. The epigenetic regulation of gene expression occurs through different cells having the same DNA blueprint but carrying molecular modifications which can be transmitted from mother cell to daughter cell during somatic cell division.

We shall examine in some detail DNA methylation and histone modifications.

DNA methylation: Cytosine is the only one of the four DNA bases that gets methylated, to form 5-methylcytosine through one of three enzymes called DNA methyltransferases. The DNMTs are examples of epigenetic 'writers' - enzymes that create the epigenetic code. Most of the time these enzymes will only add a methyl group to a C (Cytosine) that is followed by G (Guanine). C followed by G is known as CpG. The chemical group is 'stuck onto' DNA but does not alter the underlying genetic sequence. DNA methylation has profound effects on how genes are expressed and ultimately on cellular, tissue and whole-body functions. CpG pairs are concentrated in the promoter region. Promoters are the stretches of the genome where transcription complexes bind and start copying DNA to form RNA. Regions where there is a high concentration of CpG motifs are called CpG islands. When genes are active, the levels of methylation in the CpG islands is low. The CpG islands tend to be highly methylated only when the genes are switched off.

DNA methylation is clearly really important. Defects in reading DNA methylation can lead to a complex and devastating neurological disorder that leaves children with Rett syndrome severely disabled throughout their lives. DNA methylation is also important for maintaining the correct patterns of gene expression in different cell types, either for several decades in the case of our long-lived neurons or in all daughters of a stem cell in a tissue that is constantly replaced such as skin.

Histone modifications: More than fifty different epigenetic histone modifications have been identified. These modifications all alter gene expression but not always in the same way. Some histone modifications push gene expression up, others drive it down. The pattern of modifications is referred to as a histone code and is extraordinarily difficult to read. This complexity contrasts with the fairly all-or-nothing effect of DNA methylation.

As to why organisms evoved such complex patterns of histone modifications to regulate gene expression, the author offers an elegant explanation. She argues that complexity likely allows sophisticated fine-tuning of gene expression. Because of this, cells and organisms can adapt their gene expression appropriately in response to changes in their environment.

I find it fitting to conclude the review with an apt comment of the author: In biology Darwin and Mendel came to define the 19th century as the era of evolution and genetics; Watson and Crick defined the 20th century as the era of DNA, and the functional understanding of how genetics and evolution interact. But in the 21st century it is the new scientific discipline of epigenetics that is unraveling so much of what we took as dogma and rebuilding it in an infinitely more varied, more complex and even more beautiful fashion.


George Seferis: Waiting for the Angel - A Biography
George Seferis: Waiting for the Angel - A Biography
by Roderick Beaton
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A biography of George Seferis, 29 Aug 2013
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The book is meticulously researched and provides a wealth of information on George Seferis both in his capacity as a poet which culminated with the award of a Nobel prize in literature in 1963 and in his capacity as a diplomat in which he served for almost forty years and rose to a high level, culminating and ending this career as Ambassador to London and in the process providing a fascinating overview of the turbulent modern Greek politics. As a Greek Cypriot I was always deeply touched by his love of the island which resulted in poetry which rates among the very best in his oeuvre while I was profoundly impressed for his prescience on the Cyprus problem while serving as Ambassador to London though his advice was regrettably not heeded by the then Greek Foreign Minister.

What primarily informs the poet's writing is above all a Greek voice: Seferis's perspective on the history and culture of his time is always shaped by the consciousness that he was writing a living language whose successive phases can be traced back through more than three thousand years but the continuity that he claimed for Hellenism was linguistic and cultural, not biological - in the poet's writing there is not a trace of racism. The poet also felt that the notions of order against chaos and a moral law of the universe were concepts that had first been articulated in his own language.

A token of the quality of Seferis's poetry can be tasted from the following short excerpt from the official citation on the occasion of his Nobel prize award: 'Seferis's poetic production is not great in size, but because of its unique thought and style, and its beauty of language, it has become a lasting symbol of all that is indestructible in the Hellenic acceptance of life.'


The Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy
The Commanding Heights: The Battle for the World Economy
by Daniel Yergin
Edition: Paperback
Price: 10.74

4.0 out of 5 stars The "Commanding Heights" of the Economy: the transition from Government to Market control, 26 July 2013
It might be of interest to intimate the reader on the origin of the book's title the "Commanding Heights", a phrase that is recurring not only in the present book but also in subsequent books by this author: in the 1920s the communists had tried to run a mixed economy, permitting private ownership in agriculture and small business as long as the state held the "commanding heights" (Lenin's dictum). And it is well known that central planning of the Economy eventually led to the demise of the Soviet Union.

A few words on the merit of the book might also be in order. While the book does not attain the majestic heights and epic scale of his two subsequent books namely "The Prize" for which the author was awarded a Pulitzer prize and "The Quest" and while the present book concerns the Economy while the other two are on Energy still it does share many of the gratifying characteristics of its more illustrious siblings: lucid and engaging writing, erudition, and impeccable sources at the highest level of decision making in the Economy. And although the author is apparently pro-market, his writing is not ideological but pragmatic, rational,excellently documented, illuminating and authoritative.

The book written in 1998 covers the second half of the twentieth century which witnessed the transition from a Government controlled to a Market controlled economy. And while the book is global in its treatment still both trends were initiated in the United Kingdom. The pattern of the Government controlled economy started at the end of World War II by Attlee and Labor and lasted three to four decades, dubbed "the thirty glorious years" while the Market controlled Economy which characterized the latter part of the century was initiated by Margaret Thatcher.

The Attlee government had invented the mixed economy and the welfare state. They were the Labor's answer to the great Depression, World War II, and the needs of reconstruction. The Labor established and legitimized model of the "mixed economy" was characterized by strong, direct government involvement in the economy - whether through fiscal management or though a state-owned sector that coexisted with the private sector - plus an extensive welfare state. The governments of the mixed economy did so by using some combination of five sets of tools - regulation, planning, state ownership, industrial policy, and Keynesian fiscal management. These tools could be augmented by a sixth - monetary policy. In turn Britain's "postwar settlement" became the model for the relationship of the state and marketplace around the world, one in which the state was to play the guiding role.

What seems in retrospect to have precipitated the change from a Government controlled to a Market controlled economy were a combination of high inflation, slow growth, labor conflict, and social discontent experienced in the 1970s.

The protagonist of the change was the conservative Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher but was continued by the Labor Prime Minister Tony Blair with the adoption of the ideas first propounded by the Austrian economist Hayek and the Chicago School ushering in an era in which the ideas of free markets, competition, privatization, and deregulation were capturing the "commanding heights" of world economic thinking. In the 1990s the ideas that characterized Margaret Thatcher's policies had influenced a new market focus worldwide.

But what I found remarkable was that at the moment of glory of the markets around 2000 when the book was written how the author presciently outlined the potential perils posed by the markets that we are presently experiencing: markets are relentless. As competition becomes more intense,there is no respite from its pressures. People turn to government to provide shelter from the constant demand of the market. The move to the market may bring a higher standard of living, better services, and more choice. But it also brings insecurities - about unemployment, about durability of jobs and the stress of the marketplace, about the loss of protection from the vicissitudes of life, about the environment, about the unraveling of the social safety net, about health care and what happens in old age.

In conclusion a well balanced, comprehensive, and wisely written book.


The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World
The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World
by Daniel Yergin
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars A majestic all encompassing book on energy, 19 May 2013
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The book is an epic saga magnificently written on the broad spectrum of energy which underpins our modern technological civilization. The book is both authoritative and riveting. The reader has constantly the feeling that the author views from a high vantage and privileged point the unfolding global panorama of energy with all its protagonists, antagonisms, geopolitics, technological evolution, the huge energy sources in the Middle East - one quarter of global oil is located in the Persian Gulf - the struggle for the Caspian sea oil, the natural gas in Qatar, the Sands oil in Canada, and Shale gas in USA. The dominance of coal, and oil, and subsequently of natural gas. The concern for climate change due to carbon dioxide emissions and as a result the quest for clean energy and the rush to renewable s like solar, wind and bio fuels.

There are also many individual stories and protagonists magnificently related such as the natural monopoly in the form of the vertically integrated utility which combined generation, transmission, and distribution within the borders of a single company invented by Samuel Insull or the mega merges that unfolded between 1998 and 2002 representing the largest and most significant remaking of the structure of the international oil industry since 1911. Or major scientific breakthroughs such as the catalytic converter, which assured a thorough burn of the gasoline and thus much reduced smog-inducing emissions. By the end of the 1990s, the smog -causing emissions coming out of the tailpipe of a new car were only 1 percent of what they had been in the 1970s; 99 percent had been eliminated.

And finally there are projections for the future: the cost for building the new electricity capacity the doubling of growth between 2011 and 2030 is currently estimated at $14 trillion- and rising. But that expansion is what will be required to support what could be $130 trillion economy compared to $65 trillion in 2011. And what degree can such an economy, which depends presently on carbon fuels for 80 percent of its energy,move to other diverse energy source? the answers are far from obvious.


Who Owns The Future?
Who Owns The Future?
by Jaron Lanier
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 20.00

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Information economics malaise?, 17 April 2013
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This review is from: Who Owns The Future? (Hardcover)
The thesis of the book is simple but profound while its implications depressing to contemplate. The author convincingly argues that giant servers through their digital networks assemble FOR FREE huge amounts of information from millions of individuals about them creating ultra-secret mega-dossiers for their tiny number of their owners and using this information to concentrate money and power. As a result they are able to sell inexpensively services and products but there is a snag in that in the process there is an erosion of middle class jobs. The inevitable result is that that you end up with a situation in which there is a tiny number of immensely rich individuals against an impoverished society at large. Clearly this is not a sustainable economic model.

The author explains that the nature of the giant server is inconsequential, it can be a social network, an insurance company, a derivatives fund, a search engine, or an online store. All are fundamentally the same. Whatever the intent might have been, the result is a wielding of digital technology against the future of the middle class.

The author acknowledges that there is presently no viably implementable remedy. But he does speculate for a variety such as micro-payment to people for information gleaned from them if that information turns out to be valuable or that the information domain is considered a public good and taxed to support social security.

But the essential merit of the book is that it identifies the problem.

A final word concerns technological innovation which is inevitable but its application can be benign or harmful. And very obviously every effort should be invested so that intentionally or not intentionally, technological innovation is not use in a perverted way.


Gustav Klimt - The Complete Paintings
Gustav Klimt - The Complete Paintings
by Gustav Klimt
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 135.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sumptuous and definitive, 3 April 2013
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The sumptuous and masterly book was published in 2012 to coincide with the 150th anniversary of the birth of the artist; I could not conceive a better tribute to Gustav Klimt's artistic genius.

The magnificence of the color reproductions is hard to exaggerate while with respect to scholarship the book is destined to become a standard work of reference. The features that characterize Klimt's work appear in the book in all their glory:female beauty and sensuality, the opulence of his female portraiture, the splendor of his friezes, the poetry of his landscapes, and the uniqueness of his drawings.

Early works presented include the ceiling paintings for the staircases of Vienna's Burg theater and mural decorations for the Kunsthistorisches Museum.

After a painful creative crisis, the artist reinvented himself. With the founding of the Vienna Secession in 1897 and his election as its first president, Klimt announced his return as the standard bearer of Modernism. The Secession was the setting of the legendary 'Beethoven Exhibition' with Klimt's celebrated 'Beethoven Frieze', an event that saw efforts to create an integrated work of art that is unifying 'high' and 'applied art'.

We are subsequently presented with magnificent, folded, many paged, color reproductions of the mosaic frieze for the Palais Stoclet in Brussels. In the text we are intimated on the relationship between the frieze and the architecture of the Palais Stoclet and the proposed interpretation of the frieze as an artificial garden at the heart of the house.

The subject of women is central in Klimt's oeuvre, both in his portraiture and in his richly visualized allegories. Be in their reinterpretation of biblical figures such as Judith as 'femmes fatales', or in his classic portrait commissions, starting in 1897 with the portrait of Sonja Knips as the prelude to Klimt's Secessionist works, and leading to the first portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer with its opulent use of gold. Once again, however, we see Klimt reinvent himself and his painting, this time through the power of color in the female portraits and allegories of his late years. Klimt's female sitters - members of the assimilated upper bourgeoisie and often with Jewish roots - belonged with their families to the artist's most important patrons and collectors.

Klimt turned to landscape painting in the second half of his life, when he began taking annual breaks in the region of Lake Attersee. Klimt filtered and transformed seen nature to meet his own artistic requirements. In his landscapes, Nature is reconstituted into a visual poetry.

Drawing was a vital necessity of the artist. Klimt sketched his motifs thousands of times and probed the autonomy and self-sufficiency of drawings, just as he constantly tested the beauty and expressiveness of line.

The book will constitute a rare gem in your Art book collection.


Light On The Earth
Light On The Earth
by David Attenborough
Edition: Hardcover
Price: 35.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Wild life photography of awe inspiring beauty and the human drama behind its creation, 14 Mar 2013
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The pictures of wild life in the book are of awe inspiring beauty. Many of them are stunning and you feel spellbound. But from the very beginning, I advise the reader to also read the text, both the essays preceding each chapter and the captions accompanying each picture for there is poetry in them too and you obtain both an insight on the merit and personal qualities of the photographer as well as the artistry behind their creations. When you view the photographs the usual feeling for the photographer is that of talent and skill and there is certainly ample of both but in addition there are strong emotions, commitment, perseverance, physical endurance, and on occasion real risk taking, even a touch of heroism.

The 170 images in the book represent a special selection of entries from 20 years of the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition organized by BBC 'Wildlife Magazine' in conjunction with the Natural History Museum in London during which more than a quarter of a million images were submitted and more than two thousand were selected.

The book is organized in seven thematic chapters: 'Illuminations'; 'Moments'; 'Formations'; 'Reflections'; 'Formations'; 'Connections'; 'Compositions'; and 'Portraits'. Each chapter is preceded by an essay which gives a flavor and the passion of the artist and provides the reader with an insight as to what transforms records of Nature into art while each picture is accompanied by a caption which reveals the story and the artistry behind its creation.

I shall conclude the review by citing without additional commentary two of the captions.

The first concerns the photograph which graces the book cover:

'Burning of the mist'

To take such a picture took more than 200 days of photography over eight winters in Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge in New Mexico - the famous wintering site for 30,000 or more snow geese. In all that time, the photographer only twice witnessed a scene like this, when heavy mist rising from the water was irradiated by the early-morning sun, enveloping the waking geese in a celestial glow.

Arthur Morris 2001

The second concerns - what was for me - the most poignant photograph in the book.

'Eye of the zebra'

This is a haunting picture - a photographic record with a difference. The zebra is dead, shot by Western trophy hunters in the Okavango, Botswana. It was a licensed kill, justified on the basis that the bounty paid on the animal's head enters the local economy. The graphic pattern of stripes is striking, but it focuses attention on the strange eye. The black that surrounds it resembles make-up that appears to be running, as if the eye had been weeping. It highlights the green of what at first seems to be the pupil. But in place of a pupil is a reflection of the triumphant hunter with his gun, the photographer taking his shot and another figure, perhaps the tracker, standing back from the scene. Though the photographer makes no judgment, his image remains a disturbing statement.

Frans Lanting USA 1991


Sync: The Emerging Science of Spontaneous Order (Penguin Press Science)
Sync: The Emerging Science of Spontaneous Order (Penguin Press Science)
by Steven H. Strogatz
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Synchrony: self-organization and the emergence of order, 6 Mar 2013
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The subject of the book is synchrony that is coupled phenomena which occur simultaneously. Synchrony is all permeating in nature and is encountered in both living and non living matter while the underlying entity that unifies all these disparate phenomena is mathematics.

More analytically the book is a study of 'coupled oscillators' - entities that cycle automatically, that repeat themselves over and over again at regular intervals. Fireflies flash; planets orbit; pacemaker cells fire. Two or more are said to be coupled if some physical or chemical process allows them to influence one another. Fireflies communicate with light. Planets tug one another with gravity. Heart cells pass electrical current back and fourth. Nature uses every available channel to allow its oscillators to communicate with each other. The results of these communications is often synchrony, in which all oscillators begin to move as one that is occur simultaneously.

But apart from the synchrony appearing in nature, we have synchrony with the invention of the marvelous oscillators of the twentieth century: electrical generators and phase-locked loops, lasers and transistors and superconducting Josephson junctions.

The underlying unifying entity of the preceding disparate phenomena - naturally occurring or invented - is the intractability of non-linear mathematics. But the reader should not panic. The author does not use even a suspicion of Mathematics but instead illustrates the key ideas relying on metaphors and images from everyday life.

The author concludes the book with a speculative but profound insight. He points that even mainstream scientists begin to acknowledge that reduction-ism may not be powerful enough to solve all the great mysteries we are facing: cancer, consciousness, the origin of life, AIDS, global warming, the functioning of the cell, the ebb and flow of the economy. And believes that nonlinear dynamics is central to the future of science. As one of the oldest and most elementary parts on nonlinear science (dealing, as it does with purely rhythmic units), synchrony has offered penetrating insights into everything from cardiac arrhythmias to superconductivity, from sleep cycles to the stability of the power grid. It is grounded in rigorous mathematical ideas; passed the test of experiment; and it describes and unifies a remarkably wide range of cooperative behavior in living and nonliving matter, at every scale of length from subatomic to the cosmic. Aside from its importance and intrinsic fascination, the author believes that synchrony also provides a crucial first step for what is coming next in the study of complex nonlinear systems, where the oscillators are eventually to be replaced by genes and cells, companies and people.

I found it amazing that a book that is already ten years old would ring so remarkably modern.

As my own epilogue may I add that only weeks ago I listened here in the university of Cyprus a compellingly fascinating lecture by professor Focas who is also the chair of the recently established line in nonlinear Mathematics at the University of Cambridge.


Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 / Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1
Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No.3 / Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No.1
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: 9.65

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A fiery pianist performs an opulent masterpiece, 22 Feb 2013
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Martha Argerich is undoubtedly the perfect match for Rachmaninov's Third, one of the most daunting and opulent of Piano concertos. On this disc she is not simply able to tame but to dominate its music which is of the highest passion and pianistic intimacy and intensity. Her performance is sensuous, impulsive and especially in the finale's fierce momentum acutely resonating the Rachmaninov's idiom, to subtlety and rhetoric alike, while at the same time conveying her own formidable force and individuality. While her performance is throughout magnificent, it is in the finale that it is truly stunning.

In conclusion a transcendental performance of Rachmaninov's Third.

The Tchaikovsky First Piano concerto though undoubtedly a beautiful piece of music, pales by comparison.

Buy the disc primarily for Rachmaninov's Third.


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