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Let us be Human: Christianity for a collapsing culture
Let us be Human: Christianity for a collapsing culture
Price: 2.63

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A 'Wake Up!' call for Christianity, 22 Feb 2012
In this brilliantly insighful book Sam takes us on a broad brush journey. He highlights the failings of our current culture and the failings of the Church to really engage with it. That the church has understood the culture is obvious in the ways it has adopted cultural paradigms wholesale with little change or challenge. Sam righly highlights the need to see what these adopted paradigms are and choose to live, act and be different. The first part of the book helps people with little or no knowledge of the issues get to grips with the predicament (not problem) of our present age. The second part of the book is where the real meat of theological praxis is informed and honed. A definate 'Must Read' for anyone who wishes to be part of the emerging discussion surrounding what it means to be human and Christian in our time.


The Duke: Number 1 in series (Knight Miscellany)
The Duke: Number 1 in series (Knight Miscellany)
by Gaelen Foley
Edition: Paperback

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply Beautiful, 26 May 2010
This is one of the most beautiful love stories I have read (and since I get through at least 4 a week, that is saying something!) I actually went as far as to buy it, after the first reading from my local library. The hero, Robert Knight, is a man of deep integrity and almost impenetrable loneliness, who pined for a particular society beauty from afar in a display of courtly love worthy of King Arthur's Court. He cannot have her: she is the wife of a friend. When she dies in mysterious circumstances, her husband asks Robert's help. Robert's watchword in affairs of the heart is 'devotion' and this devotion to a dead woman's memory leads him to unbend his integrity and hire Belinda Hamilton, a demirep seeking a rich protector. I won't go into his reasons for doing this, but they are believable and what ensues is a poignant and fragile meeting of souls. Hired to avenge his lady love, knowing her 'services' in any other capacity are not required makes Belinda feel safe. Inexperienced as a courtesan, Bel finds herself falling in love with her 'knight-protector' as more facets of his chivalrous nature unfold. There is the usual moment of misunderstanding between the two - a moment that characterises so many romances and spoils some - but in this novel it was not at all jarring, simply part of a well-woven progression. The spell Foley weaves is not broken by anachronisms or careless errors: her prose style is lyrical and haunting and she does not feel the need to spell everything out. I like a writer who assumes her reader is intelligent. Despite their differences, the two main characters grow to respect and value one another. To say more would be to give away too much, but suffice it to say that the ending is all that anyone could wish for. I would recommend any book by Gaelen Foley, but this is one of her best.


Just Impossible (Zebra Historical Romance)
Just Impossible (Zebra Historical Romance)
by Judith A. Lansdowne
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Witty, warm and wonderful!, 26 May 2010
This is the first book I have read by this author and it was delightful on so many levels. The characters grew as the story progressed and I came to have a real affection for them. Although some stock elements are present (the formidable heroine with a dark secret, the scarred, reclusive hero, the repulsive villain) this novel gives each a new twist, with the hero very far from self-pitying - a warm and wonderful character hidden beneath a gruff exterior - and the heroine thawing realistically over time. This is also one of the few Regency romances I have read in which the mystery is genuinely a surprise to the reader and the villain not all he appears to be either. Without giving away the ending, let me say it is well worth the wait. With secondary characters to love (two of whom appear in their own book, which I am about to read) and probably (as a previous reviewer has already said) the most romantic scene I have ever read in a book of this kind, this is definitely a keeper. Having borrowed it from the library, I have now bough my own copy and it is already well-thumbed. If you like steamy sex scenes, you will be disappointed: if humour, mystery and sweet romance are what you seek, you can't do much better than 'Just Impossible'.


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