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Matthew Stoneman "90's Guy" (North Devon, England)
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Best Of 4x4 World Trophy (PS)
Best Of 4x4 World Trophy (PS)

2.0 out of 5 stars "No Roads, No Rules!"...And Hardly Much Fun Either, 24 Jun 2012
= Fun:3.0 out of 5 stars 
Big wheels, big frame structures, big engines. Driving a 4x4 sounds like a lot of fun, especially if you've got a craving for flattening hermit crabs that roam around the beach sands. But anyone hoping to find a high level of fun with 4x4 World Trophy on the PSone will be an itsy bitsy teeny weeny bit disappointed.

4x4 World Trophy has eleven courses to race on. Among them are Red Rock; a dusty, sandy desert course with a few cliff edges; Yosemite, a challenging woodlands course with narrow paths; and New York, the Big Apple with heavily snowed streets but no Friends cast members to run down...unfortunately. Once you sampled these courses in the Arcade mode (and maybe taken a quick glance at the 2-Player game as well), you'll find yourself checking out the World Tours mode. The idea here is to work your way up through three racing divisions. Each race consists of you and four other drivers. You earn points and cash, and buy new 4x4s along the way.

But while the challenge from the other drivers is welcome, the handling of the vehicles is certainly not. When you play the game there will rarely be times where you'll feel like you actually have control of your 4x4. Steering can feel unresponsive, and when it does respond it can lead you to over steer at corners and lose time. Also there are times when the 4x4 will struggle through certain parts of courses. It'll even stop altogether, forcing you to actually REVERSE for a second or two before allowing you to drive forward, therefore losing even more time. Earning money will allow you to buy upgrades for your vehicles, but to be honest you won't really feel any benefits from those upgrades. They're about as useful as a pair of sunglasses in a dark room. Not good. Not good at all.

There are also a couple of other noteworthy faults to mention here. The rewards for winning races and division cups are rather poultry. You'll find yourself having to slug it out through a lot of races before you'll earn enough money to buy a "faster" vehicle for the division 1 races. It's pretty tiring, and it feels even more annoying with every race accompanied by lame rock music. After about six races the mute button will more than certainly be your best friend.

It's a shame about the handling and the gameplay in general, because the presentation of this game is actually neat and tidy. There's no pop-up scenery in the graphics, the 4x4s have a nice amount of detail on them, and the tracks are ideally varied in terms of layout and scenery.

But it's not enough to take 4x4 World Trophy out of average city. If you're a PSone man who has a fondness of big powerful vehicles with gas-guzzling engines that tick off all the sandal-wearing hippies of the world, then you might enjoy this game. Everybody else is better off playing Gran Turismo instead.

Final Score: 5/10


Roadsters
Roadsters

4.0 out of 5 stars "Too Sexy, Baby!", 20 Jun 2012
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Roadsters (Video Game)
Life is full, full of surprises...or so Cilla Black use to say. But there is a lorra lorra truth to that statement, especially in the world of video games. A copy of Roadsters was bundled in with the second hand Nintendo 64 console I purchased from Amazon a few months ago (another game was Fighters Destiny which I have already reviewed), and I wasn't expecting too much from it. You know? Play five minutes...ten minutes, tops...a couple of races; get bored quickly; put it to one side and never play it again. But I actually found it to be quite enjoyable. It certainly made me want to complete all the championship divisions.

Roadsters was published and developed by Titus Software and released on several games consoles in 1999. Versions were made for the N64, PSone, Dreamcast and the Game Boy Colour. Apparently only the N64 version received positive feedback from critics. The game lets you race as several different characters, including Billy, Ricky and Mei-Ling. Quite frankly there isn't a looker among the lot. They all look like the ugly rejects of a Beverly Hills rich teen's party.

Fortunately the characters have no influence on race performance. That's down to you and your choice of car. Roadsters has 3 categories of cars: A, B and C. The C cars are the slowest ones while the A cars are so fast they'll leave Sebastian Vettel drooling in delight. Some of the car manufacturers include Renault, Mitsubishi and TVR, plus several made up car designs. I guess Titus wanted to flex their motoring imaginations a little bit. But when you start the game you'll notice you can only access category C. Hardly big news but you'll have to do some work if you want to unlock the A and B categories as well.

That's takes us to the main mode: the Roadsters Trophy (a Memory Pak is required to save game progress). There are three divisions to compete in. Division 3 has 6 races and small cash prizes; Division 2 has 8 races; while the money spinning Division 1 has 10 races. You need to buy certain cars in order to compete in certain divisions; and with division entry fees to take into consideration as well you pretty much have to be patient and watch those pennies.

The championships are battled out on a series of tracks. They vary in terms of layout and backgrounds, but they also vary in terms of quality. The Temple is a good track to race on with its lovely sunset sky and tropical scenery; while Area 51 has a lot of long straights and very few tight corners, making it something of a speedster's heaven. On the down side the Lumber Mill is a poorly designed track. There's a lot of snow both on the ground and on the mountain sides and at times it can very difficult to tell where the sides end and the ground begins, therefore crashing can be a regular occurrence. Meanwhile the Docklands track has low visibility. It's hard to see where you're going because of the night sky, and the numerous runoff areas make it easy for you to make a wrong turn and lose track position. All in all a mixed bag.

But what makes Roadsters fun is the challenge and variation that awaits you. No two championships are ever the same. The line-up of races constantly changes as does whether you race them the normal way or in reverse. This forces you to brush up on your driving skills, especially on the tracks you're not very fond of racing on, because your favourite tracks won't necessarily be featured in the next championship.

There's an element of strategy gaming in the championships as well. That's because of the weather. Some races will be dry and some will be raining, and then there will be some cases where it'll start or stop raining in the middle of a race. The weather does affect the handling of the cars and you should come into the pits to change tyres; although on the other hand the weather change may only be temporary so it might be worth staying out and trying to gain extra time or track positions on your opponents. A few things to take into account whilst you're racing, but like I said this provides strategy to the races, and more importantly it provides fun.

Roadsters is by no means a deep racing game, but it does have some other good points that make it worth sticking with for a little while. Graphically for the N64 it's not too shabby, and an Expansion Pak does make the game run a shade smoother. The handling feels a little loose for most of the cars, but it's easy to get use to. There are single races and time trials to enjoy, and if you've got a friend you can challenge them to a 2-Player race. Overall a good solid racer. Well worth checking out if you have an N64.

Oh, the review title? It's sort of the catchphrase of one of the drivers. It's stinks worse than "Ta-da-da-da-da-daaaa! Puppy power!" if you ask me. Now wh...? Why did I...? Look, stop asking me stupid questions and go and play the game, OK?!

Final Score: 8/10


Metroid Fusion
Metroid Fusion
Offered by MUZED Ltd
Price: 59.00

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Blast From The Past...I Mean The Future...I Mean, Uh..., 7 Jun 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Metroid Fusion (Video Game)
Some games are as easy as pie and some are as tough as iron girders. But very rarely does a game get the difficulty pitch just perfect: starting off easy, then gradually narrowing the margin for error before testing the gamer's skill to the max right at the end. Well that's what 2002's Metroid Fusion for the Game Boy Advance succeeded in doing, and it's a brilliant run-over-your-own-mother-just-to-get-your-hands-on-an-old-copy game because of it.

The heroine of the game, Samus, returns to a research station after a tough mission out in space...the final frontier!...oh, sorry. Wrong sci-fi franchise. Anyway, when Samus gets back to the station she discovers that the place has been completely overrun by a deadly virus nicknamed "X." All members of staff have perished and mutants are running amok all over the place. Under the guidance of a highly intelligent computer your task is to seek out and destroy these mutants before their destruction stretches far beyond the confines of the once innocent space station. If that's not daunting enough, a powerful Samus-lookalike called SA-X is also onboard the ship looking to take our masculine-yet-feminine heroine down. An evil twin sister? How original!

Due to an operation to fix a serious virus infection at the start of the game, Samus has lost all of her abilities from the previous games, and pretty much has to learn to walk all over again. The good news is not only will the X virus no longer hurt her -well most times at least- but collecting the yellow and green (and occasionally other colours) virus blobs will help restore health and ammo. Further help is provided by numerous save rooms for saving game progress; recharging rooms to stock up on health and weapons; and navigation rooms where you can pick up objectives from the computer as well as finding out exactly where you have to go next.

Metroid Fusion is a pretty big game. As well the main station, there are six sectors to visit underneath that. Each sector has a large number of rooms and corridors that need to be negotiated, and not all of them will initially show up on the map. It sounds daunting and before you start playing you'll probably be worried about getting lost. But actually the setup is really good.

The game provides you with a trail of breadcrumbs in terms of where to go and how to actually get there. You may find that a door is locked and cannot be unlocked until a later time, or some walls and floors require a certain power-up before you can venture beyond them. Even if you do take a wrong turn you won't have to do much in the way of back-tracking so you'll never really get frustrated in that department.

On your way to your destinations you'll come across a mass variety of ugly enemies, and when I say "ugly" I mean "Selena Gomez-ugly." The enemies will certainly keep you honest as you attempt to make progress through the corridors. But they do help build up your confidence..."?!" is probably your thought. Well you start the game; you've got basic weapons; and you can run and jump. You'll quickly figure out how best to deal with the enemies, and as you pick up stronger weapons and new moves the confidence levels will steadily rise, making the gameplay experience more enjoyable. Further confidence boosters are provided by pickups. Find these and your max health and ammo capacities will increase, making you more confident as you move into the latter stages of the game.

Like I said MF gradually gets harder as you go along, particularly with the bosses. You come face to face with them; you try to attack them; you keep getting your backside kicked in by them. The process repeats itself over and over again until...that pleasing moment comes up. That pleasing moment where you discover which weapon works best on a boss; that pleasing moment where you discover the best way to move around the room so as to keep damage from them to a minimum; that pleasing moment where the lightbulb comes on in your head and causes you to say "Ooooh, so THAT'S how I deal with the boss!" Eventually you'll defeat the bosses and feel really good about yourself. You earned your victories; you deserved them; and the fact that you're feeling positive emotions at these moments is an indication of what a great game MF is.

Metroid Fusion has a lot of positives going for it. The difficulty curve is perfect; the gameplay is very rewarding; the game's lifespan is a reasonable length; and the storyline (while not particularly big in my view) will certainly entertain lovers of anything sci-fi. There isn't really much to criticize here. The only thing I can think of is that there are no end-of-game unlockables or cheats to play around with; therefore the replay value is reduced. But that's about it.

Metroid Fusion is an amazing sci-fi blast from start to finish. It's a game you simply have to hunt down and have to play. No excuses.


Driver + Driver 2 Compilation PSX
Driver + Driver 2 Compilation PSX
Offered by chilloutgames
Price: 14.95

5.0 out of 5 stars You Are The Wheelman...Twice., 26 May 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
The more experienced games players who have been watching over the Driver series since day one will more than likely tell you that the series' better days were on the PSone. And guess what? They're right. Browsing through the video game pages of Amazon I stumbled across this Driver twin pack, and I decided to write a review on it...just for the purpose of adding another review to my profile page. Sad, isn't it?

In Driver you play the role of Tanner, an undercover cop whose main objective is to complete driving missions for small time crooks, working his way through the crime divisions before taking down a dangerous big time crimelord. You get to drive around four US cities: Miami, San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York. Each city is impressively big with plenty of roads to drive along. This combined with the nicely varied missions, perfect car handling (cornering, braking, etc.), and decent damage models for a PSone game all make Driver a dream to play.

Further enjoyment is provided by a series of mini games like Pursuit and Survival, or you can just have a leisurely drive in Take A Ride mode. Just watch out for the cops because they don't exactly waggle their joysticks in delight at your motoring skills. Driver does have some flaws. The FMVs between missions are terrible as is the voice acting, and the final Undercover mission is so tough that using cheats is a must. But overall it's a very good driving game.

Then we have Driver 2. Tanner returns for more undercover work, and this time he's joined by a teammate, Tobias Jones. The duo are looking to track down and stop an out-of-shape money man who has just jumped ship between two criminal gangs and threatened to start violence across North and South America because of this. This game has one of the best storylines in a PSone game. Following the characters from city to city and finding out what they get up to is just really exciting. Speaking of cities there are four of them: Chicago, Havana, Vegas and Rio.

Driver 2 is bigger and better than Driver in several departments. For starters the whole game comes on two discs. The cities are much bigger with much more varied buildings structures. Tanner can get out of his car and move on foot, and he can also hi-jack other vehicles. The FMVs are much better, as is the voice acting, and there are 2-Player games for you and a friend to enjoy. The only downside to Driver 2 is that the graphics are actually worse than Driver. There's a lot of pop-up with the buildings which can be distracting, and there is the occasional bit of slowdown to put up with. But with so many positive points this flaw is mostly forgivable.

Not only have you got two great PSone games here, but you've also got two of the best games in the Driver series to date. If you've got a PSone but have not yet sampled the delights of these great mission-based driving games then you should get this package.

Driver = 4-Stars
Driver 2 = 5-Stars
Overall = 5-Stars


Game Bit /Screwdriver Bit Access Tool T-Handle NES, SNES, N64, Gameboy, Master System, Mega Drive
Game Bit /Screwdriver Bit Access Tool T-Handle NES, SNES, N64, Gameboy, Master System, Mega Drive

5.0 out of 5 stars Very Handy Tool, 22 May 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought a couple of security bits to deal with the screws on my old Nintendo products. But they were very difficult to use on their own, so I needed assistance. Step up to the mark this Game Bit/Screwdriver Bit Access Tool T-Handle.

The security bits attach onto the bottom of the T-handle. After that you're ready to go. The bits are very easy to connect and disconnect, so you won't be spending ages straining your fingers trying to put the pieces in or take them out.

When I first used the tools I thought they were faulty. I kept turning them and turning them and turning them to the left, but the security screws just did not want to budge. Then I found the correct technique: Press the T-handle down really hard for the first three or four half-turns. After that relieve the pressure and merely twirl the tool to finish unscrewing. It's pretty much reverse-the-instructions in order to tighten them up again. Once I had the correct technique the tool felt like a God send.

The T-handle has a slightly rough but firm handle, allowing for a firm grip and reducing the likelihood of hand slippage. The metal pole is convincingly strong; and the tool was very kind to the screws. None of them were stripped or damaged in any way. All in all the T-handle is a very handy tool to have. If you have old Nintendo gear you want to clean up, and a couple of security bits, then this tool is a must-have.


Video Game Security Bit Set (3.8mm & 4.5mm)
Video Game Security Bit Set (3.8mm & 4.5mm)
Offered by RoughCurve
Price: 6.49

3.0 out of 5 stars Useful. But..., 22 May 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you're planning to refurbish or repair old Nintendo based consoles or cartridges, then you'll need three tools in order to deal with the security screws involved. Two of those tools are these security bits.

The security bits come in two sizes. The smaller 3.8mm piece is designed for the screws found on Nintendo cartridges, like the SNES or the Nintendo 64. Meanwhile the larger 4.5mm piece is for the actual consoles, again for the likes of the SNES and the N64. These security bits are useful. They're strong and sturdy. For me they certainly didn't become warped and stripped after a couple of uses, which is obviously good news.

I've given them 3-Stars because the difficulty in using them on their own ranges from "very hard" to "pretty much impossible". You'll need to connect them to a T-handle tool in order to use them effectively, and I would recommend the one on this link. But the bottom line is they do work. They're certainly worth picking up.


Stanley Cushion Grip Screwdriver Set Flat/Phillips 8 Piece STA065011
Stanley Cushion Grip Screwdriver Set Flat/Phillips 8 Piece STA065011
Price: 14.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Screwdriver Set, 21 May 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having developed a bit of an interest lately in maintenance and repairs of older video games consoles I knew I was gonna need some decent screwdrivers in order to deal with the numerous screws I was bound to come across. After searching around for a while on Amazon I found something that looked promising, the Stanley Cushion Grip Screwdriver Set.

The Stanley set comes with 8 screwdrivers, 4 Philips crossheads and 4 flatheads. All of them come in different lengths and head sizes, so you're bound to have at least one that'll help you deal with the screws at hand. Each screwdriver (apart from the two smallest ones) have the size and design markings on the handles, making it easier still to find the right one for the right job.

The handles are made of rubber. They're firm to the grip and reduce the likelihood of hand slipping when dealing with really tight screws. Also the tips are magnetic, making it easier to grab hold of the screws once they've been unscrewed. Others positives to point out are the overall nice and sturdy design of the screwdrivers and their reliability. Of all the screws I've worked on so far not a single one of them has become stripped. Very handy indeed.

The only minor quibble I have about the Stanley Cushion Grip Screwdriver Set is that it did not come in some sort of storage case. I was hoping mine would arrive in some sort of tool box or bag, but it didn't so I'll have to go out and buy a tool box for them instead. But other than that this is an excellent screwdriver set. If you've got an interest in old video games console maintenance and repairs, or just plain typical DIY work, then I would highly recommend purchasing this set.


Spider-Man
Spider-Man
Offered by Click4entertainment Limited
Price: 39.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars #Spider-Pig. Spider-Pig.#...What Do You Mean He's Not A Pig?, 21 May 2012
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Spider-Man (Video Game)
Charity Shops. They're not the most glamorous of places to visit, especially when you consider that a majority of its customers are OAPs looking for an extra sweater to keep them warm during the winter months. But if you give them a chance and visit the places once in a while, you might just find something good. I know I did. I started to check out the places a couple of weeks ago and I ended up finding a copy of Spider-Man for the PSone.

OK, here's the plot. A guy dressed up as our friendly neighbourhood neighbour turns up at a Science Expo and steals some sort of large machine belonging to Otto Octavius. Peter Parker -the real Spiderman- witnesses the incident, and now knowing his superhero persona is wanted by the police he sets out to find who the real machine thief was and why they stole it in the first place.

For all you acne-riddled, glasses-wearing, buck-toothed nerds who love reading comic books, there's plenty here to satisfy your super hero needs. Graphically Spider-Man is outdated, but they're still bright, colourful and well suited to the superhero theme that this game has. Also there's a big supply of supervillains for Spidey to shake a web at and take down a peg, including Scorpion, Rhino and Venom. And if that's not enough, Spider-Man co-creator Stan Lee provides a narrating voice at the beginning of certain chapters. I bet you're all soiling your pants in delight at the thought of all of those positives, aren't you?!

But seriously I had a blast playing Spider-Man, particularly when using the numerous in-game controls. You can swing between buildings by using the R2 button; you can crawl along walls and ceilings which is pretty cool; and you can attack your foes with several web-shooter attacks which can be used by pressing the triangle button and a direction on the D-pad. Or if you want you can just do some old fashioned punching and kicking with the square and circle buttons respectively. The best thing about these moves is that although there are a fair number of them to take on board you'll get to grips with these moves very quickly, therefore making enemy and boss fights more fun to play.

There are several bright and colourful levels to play through, including the dizzy heights of tall city buildings, a bank, and down in the sewers. Although some of the levels seem overly big and intimidating there's usually hints as to which direction to go in so that you don't get lost. There's enemy activity at the top of some buildings, and of course a very handy spider compass to point you in the right direction. The levels don't just involve web-swinging and fights either. There's also a bit of a puzzle element to them as well. One level early on sees you having to figure out a way to prevent a bomb from blowing up a city bank. It shouldn't take you too long to figure out what to do, but the puzzles do make the gameplay more varied and interesting.

There's also some extracurricular activity to add more excitement to this comic book adventure. There are comic books hidden all over the place. Find them and then you can check them out in the gallery on the main menu. You can also unlock different costumes to use for web-head by completing the game under certain circumstances, with some costumes even offering special abilities. These two things combined with the game's four difficulty levels (including a Kid mode for the...uh, I've forgotten what those little things are called now!) mean you'll be kept occupied with the web-slinger for some time. There's certainly no danger of completing everything in five minutes.

Spider-Man does have some flaws that prevent it from scoring higher marks. The voice acting is pretty rubbish for the most part. Peter Parker/Spiderman comes across as being arrogant and cocky, but from my understanding he was supposed to be somewhat mature but confused in the comics and cartoon shows. Also the cutscenes (from a PSone POV) are nowhere near as good as those seen in the likes of Tomb Raider Chronicles and Driver 2.

But the biggest flaw is with the game's camera. It usually sits behind our wall-crawler and usually swivels around as you make left and right turns. However it doesn't always do this and there will be times where you'll find your view of the direction you want to go in heavily restricted, making jumps and fights more difficult than they should be. Worse still there's no option to control the camera yourself, which is rather bizarre. Neversoft (the developers) could've allowed you to control it with the D-pad whilst holding down the L2 button, or they could've assigned it to the right analogue stick. It's not rocket science, Neversoft.

But overall Spider-Man is a very good game. Although it received positive reviews from video games magazines back when it was first released in 2000, for some reason it just didn't seem that appealing to me at the time. But having played it now I'm pretty much wondering why I didn't buy a copy all those years ago. The acne-riddled, glasses-wearing, buck-toothed nerds who love reading comic books will certainly enjoy playing this, and so will normal players just looking for a good retro game to play.

Uh oh, my newly found spider-sense is tingling! There's a Spider-Man 2 on the PSone as well. I should probably check it out some time.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 21, 2014 12:21 PM GMT


Doom - Platinum (PS)
Doom - Platinum (PS)

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars We're Doooooomed!!...Well, You Are. I've Already Completed This Game., 18 May 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Doom - Platinum (PS) (Video Game)
While there are many great games to play both past and present, only a handful of them have ever possessed the ability to change the landscape of the video games world. Super Mario Bros. helped rebuild the industry after the 1983 video game crash with its simple but amazing platform gameplay; Street Fighter 2 made beat-'em-ups hip and cool like a typical clothing fashion craze; while Gran Turismo set the racing game bar really high with its realistic handling and large selection of cars, making it really difficult for other racers to clear that bar. Another thing you can add to that small list is Doom...no, I'm not saying we're all doomed! I'm talking about the shooter!

Back in 1993 id Software developed and published Doom for the PC, and it became the biggest thing to happen to the video games world since CITV's Bad Influence. There were two main reasons for its success. 1) It was a first person shooter...and it was in 3D. There is some debate as to whether or not this was the first ever 3D FPS, but it's a general consensus among gamers that it was the first one to achieve high critical and commercial success. 2) It contained a lot of horror, violence and gore which did upset bible-reading, church-going pretty boys. But regardless of its morale rights and wrongs Doom certainly gave PC owners something different to do. Something a lot different to creating pink coloured cats on their cheap paint programmes.

So fast forward to 1995. Williams Entertainment were given the all clear to publish a PSone version of Doom. This version of Doom actually contains two different games: Ultimate Doom which was the first game with a few bells and whistles attached to it; and Doom 2 which was originally released on the PC in 1994. We're talking 50+ levels of running around dark and disturbing environments; pulling switches to open doors and raise platforms; and filling ugly monsters with as much lead as you can possibly get your hands on.

There is a storyline in this game, but it's not exactly flaunted like a lingerie model's double D's, so let's just move onto the gameplay. There are four difficulty levels to choose from, ranging from the easiest one called "I Am A Wimp" (which I'm sure will give newcomers a big boost of confidence!) to the toughest one called "Ultra Violence" (which is more suited to players who can shoot five enemies with a single bullet whilst drinking a cup of tea at the same time). Taking on the role of an unnamed hero you start the game with a handgun with the option to also use your bare fists, and you simply have to find each level's exit while blasting anything that gets in your way. Having four difficulty levels is ideal as newcomers will be able to adjust to Doom's scary world in the easy mode, whilst veterans can rip open their shirts and yell "BRING IT ON!!!" in the very hard mode. In short: there's fun for all experience levels.

The bottom of the screen contains all the important info. It has health and armour percentages as well as your mug shot. As you take damage your health and armour decreases and your mug shot becomes more and more bloodied until you die. Attempting to make sure death is the case is a whole host of enemies, including former comrades who have simply lost their minds, imps who can spit fire balls, and don't even get me started on the Knights of Hell. Fortunately help is at hand. There are numerous weapons to pick up along the way, such as shotguns, chainguns and rocket launchers. You'll also be able to pick up health packs and ammo, as well as key cards to open locked doors.

Compared to most FPS's that followed it Doom is a pretty basic game, but it's one that provides fun and spine chills in equal measure. The environments, the buildings, the pits, the doorways...nowhere in this game feels comfortable. They all make you feel nervous, and being confronted by a dozen monsters will only jangle your nerves even more; and while there are stronger weapons to pick up to help you cope a little better in those situations there won't be many times where you'll feel confident in making it to the end of a level. Certainly not without taking a fair amount of damage at least.

While the levels and bad guys provide the chills, the simple controls provide the fun. You can move around with the D-pad; changing weapons and strafing are assigned to the shoulder buttons; and you can fire your chosen weapon with the triangle button. You'll get to grips with these controls in a couple of minutes, and actually killing enemies in earlier levels is disturbingly pleasant. But the easy controls are important because the later levels will test your running and shooting abilities to the max, and that's what a game should be like: start off easy, gradually get harder.

So onto the negatives. Graphically the game hasn't stood the test time as well as other PSone games. The enemies just look like ironed...bead mat thingys (if you've got kids you might know what I'm talking about). Also this was an early PSone release so there's no analogue stick function. You have to use the D-pad, and because of this movements do feel stiffer than a Grandad's knee joints. Finally it is a scary game, but it's long since been surpassed by the Resident Evil series in terms of scare factor.

Overall Doom is a brilliant game. I've given it 4-Stars instead of 5 due to the outdated graphics and the restrictive movements due to the lack of analogue stick functions, but in no way should this put PSone fans off from owning a copy of this game. Did I forget to mention this piece of horror gaming has chainsaws in it too? Oh yes. I bet Bruce Campbell is licking his lips at the prospects!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 21, 2014 12:23 PM GMT


Doom
Doom

4.0 out of 5 stars We're Doooooomed!!...Well, You Are. I've Already Completed This Game., 17 May 2012
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Doom (Video Game)
While there are many great games to play both past and present, only a handful of them have ever possessed the ability to change the landscape of the video games world. Super Mario Bros. helped rebuild the industry after the 1983 video game crash with its simple but amazing platform gameplay; Street Fighter 2 made beat-'em-ups hip and cool like a typical clothing fashion craze; while Gran Turismo set the racing game bar really high with its realistic handling and large selection of cars, making it really difficult for other racers to clear that bar. Another thing you can add to that small list is Doom...no, I'm not saying we're all doomed! I'm talking about the shooter!

Back in 1993 id Software developed and published Doom for the PC, and it became the biggest thing to happen to the video games world since CITV's Bad Influence. There were two main reasons for its success. 1) It was a first person shooter...and it was in 3D. There is some debate as to whether or not this was the first ever 3D FPS, but it's a general consensus among gamers that it was the first one to achieve high critical and commercial success. 2) It contained a lot of horror, violence and gore which did upset bible-reading, church-going pretty boys. But regardless of its morale rights and wrongs Doom certainly gave PC owners something different to do. Something a lot different to creating pink coloured cats on their cheap paint programmes.

So fast forward to 1995. Williams Entertainment were given the all clear to publish a PSone version of Doom. This version of Doom actually contains two different games: Ultimate Doom which was the first game with a few bells and whistles attached to it; and Doom 2 which was originally released on the PC in 1994. We're talking 50+ levels of running around dark and disturbing environments; pulling switches to open doors and raise platforms; and filling ugly monsters with as much lead as you can possibly get your hands on.

There is a storyline in this game, but it's not exactly flaunted like a lingerie model's double D's, so let's just move onto the gameplay. There are four difficulty levels to choose from, ranging from the easiest one called "I Am A Wimp" (which I'm sure will give newcomers a big boost of confidence!) to the toughest one called "Ultra Violence" (which is more suited to players who can shoot five enemies with a single bullet whilst drinking a cup of tea at the same time). Taking on the role of an unnamed hero you start the game with a handgun with the option to also use your bare fists, and you simply have to find each level's exit while blasting anything that gets in your way. Having four difficulty levels is ideal as newcomers will be able to adjust to Doom's scary world in the easy mode, whilst veterans can rip open their shirts and yell "BRING IT ON!!!" in the very hard mode. In short: there's fun for all experience levels.

The bottom of the screen contains all the important info. It has health and armour percentages as well as your mug shot. As you take damage your health and armour decreases and your mug shot becomes more and more bloodied until you die. Attempting to make sure death is the case is a whole host of enemies, including former comrades who have simply lost their minds, imps who can spit fire balls, and don't even get me started on the Knights of Hell. Fortunately help is at hand. There are numerous weapons to pick up along the way, such as shotguns, chainguns and rocket launchers. You'll also be able to pick up health packs and ammo, as well as key cards to open locked doors.

Compared to most FPS's that followed it Doom is a pretty basic game, but it's one that provides fun and spine chills in equal measure. The environments, the buildings, the pits, the doorways...nowhere in this game feels comfortable. They all make you feel nervous, and being confronted by a dozen monsters will only jangle your nerves even more; and while there are stronger weapons to pick up to help you cope a little better in those situations there won't be many times where you'll feel confident in making it to the end of a level. Certainly not without taking a fair amount of damage at least.

While the levels and bad guys provide the chills, the simple controls provide the fun. You can move around with the D-pad; changing weapons and strafing are assigned to the shoulder buttons; and you can fire your chosen weapon with the triangle button. You'll get to grips with these controls in a couple of minutes, and actually killing enemies in earlier levels is disturbingly pleasant. But the easy controls are important because the later levels will test your running and shooting abilities to the max, and that's what a game should be like: start off easy, gradually get harder.

So onto the negatives. Graphically the game hasn't stood the test time as well as other PSone games. The enemies just look like ironed...bead mat thingys (if you've got kids you might know what I'm talking about). Also this was an early PSone release so there's no analogue stick function. You have to use the D-pad, and because of this movements do feel stiffer than a Grandad's knee joints. Finally it is a scary game, but it's long since been surpassed by the Resident Evil series in terms of scare factor.

Overall Doom is a brilliant game. I've given it 4-Stars instead of 5 due to the outdated graphics and the restrictive movements due to the lack of analogue stick functions, but in no way should this put PSone fans off from owning a copy of this game. Did I forget to mention this piece of horror gaming has chainsaws in it too? Oh yes. I bet Bruce Campbell is licking his lips at the prospects!


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