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Mr. D. M. Blyth "dmblyth" (Stotfold, Bedfordshire, U.K.)
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The Last Dragonslayer (Last Dragonslayer Book 1)
The Last Dragonslayer (Last Dragonslayer Book 1)
by Jasper Fforde
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bye Bye Baby, 7 Nov 2010
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Reading this after reading the 'Thursday Next' sequence and the Nursery Rhyme duet was very much like listening to Solti's 'Ring' recordings followed by his 'Die Meistersinger' then finding the Bay City Rollers singing 'ByeBye Baby' at the end of the last CD. It's all very well telling us now that it is meant for younger readers but there is nothing on the book jacket to indicate this and there was nothing on Amazon's website when I ordered it. I have pre-ordered 'One of our Thursdays is Missing' - I hope that Mr Fforde will be back on form by then.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 27, 2010 8:57 AM GMT


Trials of the Diaspora: A History of Anti-Semitism in England
Trials of the Diaspora: A History of Anti-Semitism in England
by Anthony Julius
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.86

31 of 47 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not 'readable', 13 Mar 2010
My argument is with the publishers and the reviewers rather than the author. Although this book is well-researched it is not, by any means 'readable' in the sense that it flows. More than 20% of the book is taken up with notes referenced in the main body of the text. Every one is numbered in the text, a constant distraction to the eye and few are worth following up immediately. This is all very good and commendable academic practice but it does not make the book 'readable'. It is a book for studying. Although the book divides the history into four broad sections, material and sources are cross-referenced over all four ("I will deal with this in chapter 6....") making the arguments difficult to follow without recourse to post-it notes, pencil marks in the margin or copious personal note-taking. In the end, this book is an academic volume aimed at those who have the time and skill to study it in depth and discuss it with others. It is not for the general reader, even one with a very high level of education.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 20, 2010 5:17 PM BST


After the Reich: From the Liberation of Vienna to the Berlin Airlift
After the Reich: From the Liberation of Vienna to the Berlin Airlift
by Giles Macdonogh
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.39

19 of 28 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Much research but little thought, 26 Jan 2009
Giles MacDonogh has done a colossal amount of research for this book but, having ploughed my way through it, I am left wondering why. In the book, I read excerpts from myriad sources, all carefully referenced, about rape, theft, robbery, starvation and injustice without any sense of development or structure. It was rather like reading a horror version of the 'Yellow Pages'. From time to time, we are given excerpts from fiction, such as 'The Third Man' by Graham Greene which, although set at the time period covered and of unquestionable literary merit, can scarcely be considered primary or even secondary source material. I had the feeling throughout that the author was trying too hard to get his main points across and failing as a result.
I have not read all of his source materials, by any means, but I have read 'The Berlin Diaries' by Missie Vasilchikov many times, 'The Past is Myself' by Christabel Bielenberg as well as many others and I have spoken to many German friends about this time in their country's history and found them all considerably more illuminating than this book.
I hope that someone of the ability of Laurence Rees may be persuaded to tackle this time in history as he has done so effectively with his other work. That would be a book worth reading
I wouldn't bother with this one.


The Private Patient (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery)
The Private Patient (Adam Dalgliesh Mystery)
by P.D. James
Edition: Hardcover

14 of 20 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Going way off the boil., 4 Oct 2008
From the crass character set-up over lunch at the Ivy to the very unsatisfactory ending with a confusing subplot, this book did not hold my attention at all. Is it really from the author of 'Devices and Desires' and 'Original Sin'? Can this be the work of the author of 'The Lighthouse?' It reads like a (bad) parody of Agatha Christie. A great disappointment.


Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen -- Metropolitan/Levine [DVD] [2002] [NTSC]
Wagner: Der Ring des Nibelungen -- Metropolitan/Levine [DVD] [2002] [NTSC]
Dvd ~ James Morris
Price: £43.19

32 of 41 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Stretching credibility too far, 1 Aug 2007
It seems churlish to disagree with all the praise heaped on this production here but, having bought it at full price when it first came out, I have only watched it once because I found it boring at best and unbelievable at worst. (I have seen the 'Ring' in its entirety three times since then, in three different productions so it's not Wagner's fault). The acting is leaden and operatic in the worst sense of the word, the costumes are all enormous and make the, already large, cast look as though they all came from Riesenheim. Levine's conducting lacks drive and subtlety. Are we really expected to believe that Gary Lakes and Jessye Norman are twins and children of James Morris? It seems to to me typical of Met. productions - they suffer from having too much money and not enough imagination spent on them. The video production is no more than adequate- the producer/director should learn from Glyndebourne's team.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 15, 2011 12:53 PM BST


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