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Numinous Ugo (Edinburgh)

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Flowering
Flowering
Price: 20.93

5.0 out of 5 stars The Brilliant Charles Lloyd Quartet, 27 Sep 2013
This review is from: Flowering (Audio CD)
With Lloyd on Sax and Flute, Keith Jarrett Piano, Cecil McBee Bass and Jack DeJohnette Drums, this was one of the greatest jazz bands of that, or any other, era. It seems odd to me that The Flowering has been less easily available in UK for years than Charles Lloyd In Europe which was recorded on the same tour, some tracks on The Flowering (although it is difficult to establish which) were recorded at the same gig as CL in Europe.

Whilst I really like that other album this album has a distinct edge on it. the band are all flying and this unit had the potential to go on to bigger and better things, if Miles Davis had not poached Jarrett and DeJohnette. If you see this album and are hesitating because you feel that if it had been any good it would have been available more easily much sooner then put your doubts aside; this is a cracking album and I love it!


Radio Days [DVD]
Radio Days [DVD]
Dvd ~ Mia Farrow
Offered by skyvo-direct
Price: 7.43

5.0 out of 5 stars Beware Evil Doers Everywhere, 18 Sep 2013
This review is from: Radio Days [DVD] (DVD)
The genius of Woody Allen is to shine a nostalgic light on the 1940s which is affectionate and warm but at the same time not sanitising it. This film shows obvious warm memories of an era but also show some of the frustrations and tragedy of the era also. It is episodic but this is Allen's real strength, he keeps the audience engaged but also brings the various key strands to a conclusion. Mia Farrow is brilliant as she so often is in Allen's movies but there are so many great performances, the other stand out for me is Wallace Shawn as the actor who plays The Masked Avenger.


The Man Who Came to Dinner [Region 2] by William Keighley, Bette Davis, Ann Sheridan, and Jimmy Durante (DVD)
The Man Who Came to Dinner [Region 2] by William Keighley, Bette Davis, Ann Sheridan, and Jimmy Durante (DVD)
Offered by Lakeland Express
Price: 18.85

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of my favourite films, 30 Aug 2013
This is a film adaptation of the play written by by George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart. as a vehicle for their friend Alexander Woollcott, who was the basis for the character Sheridan Whiteside. They were struggling with coming up with a suitable plot when Woollcott descended on on Hart's Bucks County home, took over the master bedroom bullied the staff and wrote in the visitors bok on his departure, "This is to certify that I had one of the most unpleasant times I ever spent." When Hart relayed these events Kaufman said that it was luck that Alexander Woolcott did not break his leg and been stuck there. So the plot was born, based loosely on actual evens.

In the end Alexander Woollcott was not available when the play was first staged, although he did later play Sheridan Whiteside in the West Coast production and it was Monty Woolley who first played the lead role and who also appears in this film version. Other characters who are based on a real people are Beverly Carlton was based on Noel Coward and Banjo, played in the film by Jimmy Durante is based on Harpo Marx, who played the character in the in the same West Coast stage production that Alexander Woollcott appeared in.

The big revelation for me though was Bette Davis, who played Whiteside's private secretary Maggie Cutler, who falls in love with the local journalist and aspiring writer Bert Jefferson played by Richard Travis. Here she plays one of her very rare romantic comic roles.


Soulero
Soulero
Offered by musikdrehscheibe
Price: 25.32

5.0 out of 5 stars Tender Gender Plus, 21 Aug 2013
This review is from: Soulero (Audio CD)
This CD compilation contains all of Burrell's 1966 album The Tender Gender a single track, My Favorite Things, from Have Yourself a Soulful Little Christmas (the rest of that album consists of strictly Christmas tunes and so this track is well served by being isolated from them) and side two of his album Ode to 52nd Street /Grp leaving off the Suite for Guitar and Orchestra.

Although Kenny Burrell can be considered to be rather easy listening jazz at times that should not mean that his music is not worthwhile. If I want challenging jazz I can listen to late period John Coltrane and a whole host of others but kenny Burrell provides a satisfying groove and some dexterous playing that is never self indulgent.

I would strongly recommend this as a really good Kenny Burrell album.


Flowering/Warne Marsh
Flowering/Warne Marsh
Price: 21.26

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Charles Lloyd and Warne Marsh, 14 Aug 2013
This review is from: Flowering/Warne Marsh (Audio CD)
I got this for the Charles Lloyd album with Lloyd on Sax and Flute, Keith Jarrett Piano, Cecil McBee Bass and Jack DeJohnette Drums, this was one of the greatest jazz bands of that, or any other, era. It seems odd to me that The Flowering has been less easily available in UK for years than Charles Lloyd In Europe which was recorded on the same tour, some tracks on The Flowering (although it is difficult to establish which) were recorded at the same gig as CL in Europe.

Whilst I really like that other album this album has a distinct edge on it. the band are all flying and this unit had the potential to go on to bigger and better things, if Miles Davis had not poached Jarrett and DeJohnette.

If you are hesitating about The Flowering because you feel that if it had been any good it would have been available more easily much sooner then put your doubts aside; this is a cracking album and I love it!

So I got the Charles Lloyd album I wanted and as a huge bonus I was also blown away by Warne Marsh. An inspired combo. Note, however, that the MP3 download is for The Flowering on its own the Warne Marsh album can be downloaded on its own from Warne Marsh


Special Edition
Special Edition
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: 23.10

5.0 out of 5 stars Very Special Edintion, 8 Aug 2013
This review is from: Special Edition (Audio CD)
This contains the albums:
1. Special Edition
2. Tin Can Alley
3. Inflation Blues
4. Album Album
The first one I owned was the last of these and I have been a huge fan of that album in particular and of this band generally. There have been many great jazz drummers/band leaders but Jack DeJohnette is way up there with the very best. He deserve that place for his work as band leader, for his work with Miles Davis, with Gateway, with Keith Jarrett, Joe Henderson, Charles Lloyd, Freddie Hubbard... individually. Special Edition was a truly special band, I cannot recommend this highly enough.


Invocations: Moth & The Flame
Invocations: Moth & The Flame

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 8 Aug 2013
Invocations organ and saxophone suite is dark and brooding but I always really loved it. I bought this on vinyl when it came out and the Invocations disc got lots of play in my house, but mostly when I was on my own. although I tried to turn other people on to it they found it too difficult.

The Second disc, Moth and the Flame is very dense, improvised piano work, which took me longer to get into but is also one of Jarrett's finest pieces. It is unfortunate that this album has been considered as one of his lesser works, but considering how prolific he has been it is surprising that so few of his albums have lapsed into obscurity.

I recommend 2 things for anyone considering buying this fine album: 1. be prepared that this is not easy access Keith Jarret, it requires some active listening on the part of the listener, and 2. approach this as two separate albums. Invocations is very different from Moth and the Flame.

Once you 'get it' then you will be richly rewarded. I was going to say that this is not dinner party music but I remember when I first got this album my parents had friends for dinner and one of then insisted on having this playing throughout dinner. It needed to be quite loud because the hi-fi was in the sitting room, across the hall from the dining room no portable music players in those days.

I have many many Keith Jarrett albums, but this remains one of my favourites.


Grievous Angel
Grievous Angel

0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Strictly Not For Non-country Fans, 4 Aug 2013
This review is from: Grievous Angel (Audio CD)
I agree that I am writing this review from the perspective of a non-country fan. Up until a couple of years ago it was the only genre that I would not consider having in my collection but my son, who has an even more eclectic taste in music than me, has incrementally turned me on to Johnny Cash, Hank Williams and a few others. I was looking again at 1001 Albums 2011: You Must Hear Before You Die (1001 Must Before You Die) and saw this album again feature in a must hear list. This and hearing again recently about Keith Richards' admiration for him I thought that I should give it a try. I was immediately sorry I bought it.

Although instrumentally there may be some very skilled playing here it is just so hackneyed. My problem with country music has not been the quality of the musicianship, which is often excellent, it is the saccharine arrangements; it is music for listeners who do not want to put any effort into getting the music at all; musical fast food if you like.

If you do not absolutely love country music then avoid this like the plague; if you do love it then this is probably right up your street and you should probably own it already.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 8, 2014 11:03 PM GMT


On The Corner
On The Corner
Offered by Hot Cakes
Price: 8.55

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 23 July 2013
This review is from: On The Corner (Audio CD)
I was put off getting this album until quite late on in my Miles Davis collecting. The reason must be pretty clear to any who have read about his music in general and the critical reception of this album in particular. Bitches Brew may have alienated jazz critics like Stanley Crouch (see Miles Electric: A Different Kind Of Blue [DVD] [2004]) as his music has certainly not straight jazz by that time; more jazz/rock fusion with an emphasis on rock and jazz critics were simply not the people to be asking; they had no frame of reference to measure it against.

1970-71 saw Miles gathering a much bigger audience for his music, playing concert venues rather than jazz clubs. He had played the 1970 Isle of Wight Festival to 600'000 people (as featured in Miles Electric, mentioned above) but Miles was becoming concerned that he was losing his black audience. His response to that anxiety was On the Corner. If the jazz critics hated Bitches Brew, it seemed that everybody hated On the Corner. The cover sets it up, very 'Street' and aggressively so. The music is uncompromisingly rhythmic and dense. The soloing instruments are kept back amongst the pulsing rhythm and even to sympathetic ears it does, even today, sound a bit unrelenting on first listen.

Time, however, has been very forgiving to this album. The gradual catching up that various forms of popular music have done in the past 40 years (but not jazz) has meant that current audiences are far more receptive. I had gone through a learning process with Miles' music, which lead up to On the Corner, aided by Ian Carr's excellent Miles Davis: The Definitive Biography. Carr contends that despite Miles changing the genre setting of his music over his career, what de did as a player really was very much the same; he created a setting that he and his featured soloists could play against.

Here it was pretty clear that Miles was making statement; he was echoing that thing that Jack Johnson said "I'm black, they ain't never gonna let me forget it. I'm black alright, I ain't never gonna let them forget it." What Miles did here was to re-establish that he was not going to be tamed into the sort of black artist that white America could be comfortable with; he was going to do it on his own terms. Having said that this is also, for those willing to actually listen, a brilliant album, which I listen to again and again.


Far From Home
Far From Home
Price: 7.90

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Traffic? But Still Great!, 12 July 2013
This review is from: Far From Home (MP3 Download)
Okay so some might see this as another Steve Winwood album with Jim Capaldi coming along for the ride, however, although there may be a small grain of truth in this, there is also far more to this album that that.
Steve Winwood had particular reason to want to break away from the malign forces of record company A&R meddling in the recording process. The effect of that interference was perhaps only subtle and the, i.e. looking back at Junction Seven and Refugees of the Heart, these albums have more merit than many at the time declared. I never listened to them when they were released and now find that there is enough there to still make them worthwhile.

This "Traffic" album is a return to the musicians being in charge of the creative process. Even if it only performed the role that David Bowie's Tin Machine experiment did, i.e. freeing him from the demands of the record company, it would have been worthwhile, but it is actually a great collection of songs. Okay so the drafting in of at least a bass player and perhaps a guitarist to make it a genuine new version of Traffic would have broadened it out a bit but I am also realistic enough to know that the approach here made sense financially. A bigger group of musicians would have needed record company support just when these guys were trying to free themselves from record company control.

So this sounds more like a very good Steve Winwood album than a Traffic album but I'll live with that.


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