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David Kelly
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Insight Flexi Map: Istanbul (Insight Flexi Maps)
Insight Flexi Map: Istanbul (Insight Flexi Maps)
by Apa
Edition: Map

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Look elsewhere, 7 Oct. 2011
This is quite useless as a tourist map. The scale is too big and valuable space is wasted on tourist tips. I wanted a map, not a travel guide. The free map from the tourist information desk at the airport is far better.


Illustrated C# 2008 (Expert's Voice in .NET)
Illustrated C# 2008 (Expert's Voice in .NET)
by Daniel M. Solis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £35.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not practical, 6 July 2009
Good layout and text so its easy to understand. But the dry, factual tone makes no attempt to engage the reader.

For me there were 2 big omissions. Firstly, there were no explanations of why different features would be used. Secondly, there are no exercises.

As a reference book for beginners this is very good. But if you want a practical book to learn C#, look elsewhere.


The Rough Guide To Climate Change (Rough Guides Reference Titles)
The Rough Guide To Climate Change (Rough Guides Reference Titles)
by Bob Henson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 12 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Dull, 6 July 2009
I never realised that the subject of climate change could be so boring. The first half of the book is fact after fact after fact. It does pick up a bit in the second half, but like many proposals to deal with global warming, it was too little, too late.

This book is clearly targeted at a British and American audience which is probably why every measurement is annoyingly given in both metric and imperial units


The Power Of Positive Thinking
The Power Of Positive Thinking
by Norman Vincent Peale
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

4.0 out of 5 stars Positive, 6 July 2009
This reminded me of Dale Carnegie's books - very dated, and overloaded with examples. The Christian aspect might not appeal to some people but I found a lot of useful stuff here. It's unfortunate that there are so many stories to wade through.


Microsoft® Visual C#® 2008 Step by Step (PRO- Step by Step Developer)
Microsoft® Visual C#® 2008 Step by Step (PRO- Step by Step Developer)
by John Sharp
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK, 6 July 2009
Well laid out, easy to read and understand. But the examples and exercises are very poor.


The Screwtape Letters: includes Screwtape Proposes a Toast (C.S. Lewis Signature Classics, Sixtieth Anniversary Edition)
The Screwtape Letters: includes Screwtape Proposes a Toast (C.S. Lewis Signature Classics, Sixtieth Anniversary Edition)
by C. S. Lewis
Edition: Paperback

3 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not so good, 6 July 2009
If the idea was to get the message of Christianity across without preaching or sermonising, it doesn't work. I found the writing to be patronising and dated, resulting in a boring read. Not one of his better books.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 4, 2012 12:29 AM GMT


Teach Yourself Emotional Intelligence
Teach Yourself Emotional Intelligence
by Christine Wilding
Edition: Paperback

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth reading, 31 Dec. 2008
Good book. So much information that I had to read it twice and I still haven't taken it all in. The basic idea is awareness and management of your emotions and those of others. There are concepts here that everyone will find useful - all you need is a willingness to learn more about yourself. It can be scary at times to see the low level (or absence) of some of these principles in ourselves, but self-realisation is the first step towards improvement in any area.

It's not perfect. Some of the exercises are a bit vague and could benefit from an example. Also, there is a tendency to see things in
black and white with no middle ground. Certain things about the reader are assumed - family/friends who are willing to let you practice your new-found skills, various past experiences ready to be recalled. The last section is about using EI in the work place, in intimate relationships and with children - 3 areas that are not open to many people. And some of the sections are annoyingly short, but it is a small book.

However, I would recommend reading this book (at least once). We can all learn something from it.


The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking the Poet Within
The Ode Less Travelled: Unlocking the Poet Within
by Stephen Fry
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

20 of 39 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 31 Dec. 2008
It starts well. The first section (on metre) is easy to read and understand, with plenty of examples. The constant attemps at humour in the first few pages soon dies out, thankfully, and I found the content both interesting and informative.

Unfortunately the second half of the book isn't as good. The chapter on form soon becomes bogged down in numerous short sections that seem to blend into each other in a mishmash of similar names. Also, the author appears to believe that vulgarities and obscenities are necessary to further the reader's understanding of the topics.

Overall, a very good book on metre, but the rest is poor.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 28, 2015 3:07 PM GMT


Psycho-Cybernetics
Psycho-Cybernetics
by Maltz
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good, 6 Dec. 2008
This book is nearly 50 years old and it shows, from the sexist, racist language, to the frequent referrals to cigarettes, to the archaic computer science. (I see that, in the updated version, cigarettes have been replaced by pencils.)

But some of the points he makes are still appearing as big topics in self-help books today. He tells us that we should live in the present; that real happiness only comes from inside; that we get what we focus on; that our life is what our thoughts make it; that we are not our thoughts; that by changing our beliefs, we can change out self image and behaviour. This book contains the basic ideas of emotional intelligence and NLP, and of authors like Eckhart Tolle and Ester Hicks .

I'm glad I read the original version, but after glancing through the newer book, I think the latter is probably better.

A good read.


First Things First
First Things First
by Stephen R. Covey
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 18 Nov. 2008
This review is from: First Things First (Paperback)
Covey's '7 Habits' had some good ideas but was too long. This book is also over-written but, for me, contains very little of value. It reads like a course manual and is certainly directed to an American audience. Practically every example involves the office or the family - perhaps the authors think that only executives with a spouse and children have busy lives.
Many of the example stories serve only to highlight the wisdom of the authors in solving the problems of others. The stories they relate about their own families are frightening - do they really believe that American families are so dysfunctional that they need to be run like a business, with meetings, schedules, mission statements and feedback?
My favourite line appears in chapter 11 - 'Where would we be without doctors, hospitals, penicillin and health insurance?' For me, that summed up the tone of the whole book.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 6, 2014 11:10 AM BST


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