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The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children Book 1)
The Clan of the Cave Bear (Earth's Children Book 1)
Price: £5.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Neighbours! Everybody needs cro-magnon neighbours!, 26 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Neolithic Europe, Ayla - a young Cro-magnon child is adopted by a tribe of Neanderthals when her true parents die in an earthquake. Clan of the Cave Bear tells the tale of Ayla's early years, her adoption by Iza the clan's medicine woman, her gradual acceptance into the tribe and her conflict with her step-cousin Broud.

This is a bit of an epic; a large book in itself, it is the first of six in the series. Not having read the next five, I can't say how the story or the writing develops. This first episode is a bit of a curate's egg, though. It's certainly well researched, if you can accept that our understanding of Neolithic man has developed somewhat in the 35 years since it was written. A good deal of Auel's anthropological and botanical research comes through in the text, in large semi-digestible chunks, in fact, as if she was reluctant to let her work go to waste. This means that there are a number of rather dry descriptive chapters on the flora and fauna of the region or on Neanderthal customs and anthropology. It is also transpires that some of this research turns out to be more than little speculative, to be kind about it. That's all right - this IS a novel after all - but it's useful to keep that in mind as you read.

It's certainly an absorbing story. The early sections, where nothing much seems to be happening tended to drag for me and I do think that this book would have benefitted from a decent edit. Things warm up as the story progresses and as Ayla approaches adulthood. No, it's not an adventure or action novel - more along the lines of a Neolithic Aga Saga. But if the plotting is a tad slow, the writing is certainly competent and readable. Characterisation is also OK although as the story progressed I became less and less convinced by the Neanderthal protagonists who communicate - almost solely by gesture and grunts - surprisingly eloquently.

While I enjoyed Clan of the Cave Bear, I didn't love it and I'm in two minds as to whether I really want to read the next in the series. However, if you like big, immersive reads and like your mammoth cooked medium-rare, this may be the novel for you.


Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 9FS 49FG 1941 - Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 9FS 49FG 1941 (EM37273)
Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 9FS 49FG 1941 - Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 9FS 49FG 1941 (EM37273)
Offered by inandout-distribution
Price: £5.79

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tiny Tomahawk, 25 Feb. 2015
The Curtiss P40 was a single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. In its various guises it was named the Warhawk (all USAAC marks), Tomahawk or Kittyhawk (where operated by British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces, depending, again, on the Mark). It served with many Allied air forces and in pretty much every theatre of the war and, operated by the The Flying Tigers (volunteer American airmen serving in the Chinese air force) it distinguished itself against the Japanese. Although its performance meant that it struggled against contemporary high performance fighters it did nevertheless manage operate effectively as an air superiority fighter, at times suffering severe losses, but also handing out the punishment to enemy aircraft.

EasyModel manufacture a seemingly endless line of military models; not toys, but rather collector pieces. Take a look at their Platinum Collection Aircraft product line... a huge range of aircraft covering the obvious subjects (Spitfires, [[ASIN: Hurricanes]] and Messerschmitts) but also less obvious (the Hawker Tempest or the FW190) or even obscure aircraft (the He162 Salamander or the Lavochkin La7). Not only that, but each aircraft can be bought in one of several marking schemes - they do several versions of the P40 - so there's a lot for you to collect, if you're wealthy (and obsessed) enough.

These 1/72 scale models are all ready-assembled in plastic and fully painted and the quality is surprising. Obviously, if you've the inclination and skill, a good build-your-own P40 kit will come out looking better... but not much. The propeller turns, the panel lines are engraved, the (striking) paint scheme is detailed and well executed and the shape is - as far as I can see - accurate. There's even a little cockpit detail. This P40 has a belly tank with a nicely detailed cradle and even some almost unreadably small "stencil markings".

On the negative side, you're stuck with the undercarriage down and there's a small alignment problem in one of the painted on markings, but really those hardly qualify as legitimate complaints when you consider the high quality of the model overall.


Daron Worldwide Trading EM37274 Easy Model P40E 16TH Fs 23RD Fg 1942 1/72
Daron Worldwide Trading EM37274 Easy Model P40E 16TH Fs 23RD Fg 1942 1/72
Offered by inandout-distribution
Price: £5.79

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tiny Tomahawk, 25 Feb. 2015
The Curtiss P40 was a single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. In its various guises it was named the Warhawk (all USAAC marks), Tomahawk or Kittyhawk (where operated by British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces, depending, again, on the Mark). It served with many Allied air forces and in pretty much every theatre of the war and, operated by the The Flying Tigers (volunteer American airmen serving in the Chinese air force) it distinguished itself against the Japanese. Although its performance meant that it struggled against contemporary high performance fighters it did nevertheless manage operate effectively as an air superiority fighter, at times suffering severe losses, but also handing out the punishment to enemy aircraft.

EasyModel manufacture a seemingly endless line of military models; not toys, but rather collector pieces. Take a look at their Platinum Collection Aircraft product line... a huge range of aircraft covering the obvious subjects (Spitfires, [[ASIN: Hurricanes]] and Messerschmitts) but also less obvious (the Hawker Tempest or the FW190) or even obscure aircraft (the He162 Salamander or the Lavochkin La7). Not only that, but each aircraft can be bought in one of several marking schemes - they do several versions of the P40 - so there's a lot for you to collect, if you're wealthy (and obsessed) enough.

These 1/72 scale models are all ready-assembled in plastic and fully painted and the quality is surprising. Obviously, if you've the inclination and skill, a good build-your-own P40 kit will come out looking better... but not much. The propeller turns, the panel lines are engraved, the (striking) paint scheme is detailed and well executed and the shape is - as far as I can see - accurate. There's even a little cockpit detail. This P40 has a belly tank with a nicely detailed cradle and even some almost unreadably small "stencil markings".

On the negative side, you're stuck with the undercarriage down and there's a small alignment problem in one of the painted on markings, but really those hardly qualify as legitimate complaints when you consider the high quality of the model overall.


Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 77 Sqn RAAF 1942 - EM37271
Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 77 Sqn RAAF 1942 - EM37271
Offered by inandout-distribution
Price: £5.79

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tiny Tomahawk, 25 Feb. 2015
The Curtiss P40 was a single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. In its various guises it was named the Warhawk (all USAAC marks), Tomahawk or Kittyhawk (where operated by British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces, depending, again, on the Mark). It served with many Allied air forces and in pretty much every theatre of the war and, operated by the The Flying Tigers (volunteer American airmen serving in the Chinese air force) it distinguished itself against the Japanese. Although its performance meant that it struggled against contemporary high performance fighters it did nevertheless manage operate effectively as an air superiority fighter, at times suffering severe losses, but also handing out the punishment to enemy aircraft.

EasyModel manufacture a seemingly endless line of military models; not toys, but rather collector pieces. Take a look at their Platinum Collection Aircraft product line... a huge range of aircraft covering the obvious subjects (Spitfires, [[ASIN: Hurricanes]] and Messerschmitts) but also less obvious (the Hawker Tempest or the FW190) or even obscure aircraft (the He162 Salamander or the Lavochkin La7). Not only that, but each aircraft can be bought in one of several marking schemes - they do several versions of the P40 - so there's a lot for you to collect, if you're wealthy (and obsessed) enough.

These 1/72 scale models are all ready-assembled in plastic and fully painted and the quality is surprising. Obviously, if you've the inclination and skill, a good build-your-own P40 kit will come out looking better... but not much. The propeller turns, the panel lines are engraved, the (striking) paint scheme is detailed and well executed and the shape is - as far as I can see - accurate. There's even a little cockpit detail. This P40 has a belly tank with a nicely detailed cradle and even some almost unreadably small "stencil markings".

On the negative side, you're stuck with the undercarriage down and there's a small alignment problem in one of the painted on markings, but really those hardly qualify as legitimate complaints when you consider the high quality of the model overall.


Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 11FS 343FG 1942 - EM37272
Easy Model 1:72 - P-40E Tomahawk - 11FS 343FG 1942 - EM37272
Offered by Creative Models Ltd
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tiny Tomahawk, 25 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
The Curtiss P40 was a single-seat, all-metal fighter and ground attack aircraft that first flew in 1938. In its various guises it was named the Warhawk (all USAAC marks), Tomahawk or Kittyhawk (where operated by British Commonwealth and Soviet air forces, depending, again, on the Mark). It served with many Allied air forces and in pretty much every theatre of the war and, operated by the The Flying Tigers (volunteer American airmen serving in the Chinese air force) it distinguished itself against the Japanese. Although its performance meant that it struggled against contemporary high performance fighters it did nevertheless manage operate effectively as an air superiority fighter, at times suffering severe losses, but also handing out the punishment to enemy aircraft.

EasyModel manufacture a seemingly endless line of military models; not toys, but rather collector pieces. Take a look at their Platinum Collection Aircraft product line... a huge range of aircraft covering the obvious subjects (Spitfires, [[ASIN: Hurricanes]] and Messerschmitts) but also less obvious (the Hawker Tempest or the FW190) or even obscure aircraft (the He162 Salamander or the Lavochkin La7). Not only that, but each aircraft can be bought in one of several marking schemes - they do several versions of the P40 - so there's a lot for you to collect, if you're wealthy (and obsessed) enough.

These 1/72 scale models are all ready-assembled in plastic and fully painted and the quality is surprising. Obviously, if you've the inclination and skill, a good build-your-own P40 kit will come out looking better... but not much. The propeller turns, the panel lines are engraved, the (striking) paint scheme is detailed and well executed and the shape is - as far as I can see - accurate. There's even a little cockpit detail. This P40 has a belly tank with a nicely detailed cradle and even some almost unreadably small "stencil markings".

On the negative side, you're stuck with the undercarriage down and there's a small alignment problem in one of the painted on markings, but really those hardly qualify as legitimate complaints when you consider the high quality of the model overall.


Ainsley Harriot Wild Mushroom Soup (Pack of 9)
Ainsley Harriot Wild Mushroom Soup (Pack of 9)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not mushroom for shitake, 13 Feb. 2015
I suppose one must try to avoid expecting too much when it comes to cup-soups, but in this particular case Ainsley does at least manage to provide something that tastes like a typical cream-of-mushroom cuppa. Nothing to get too annoyed at, the texture is faux-creamy and the taste faux-mushroomy. Perhaps a little too salty for me but that's more likely a matter of taste. Not a bad effort, but don't get too excited by the "premium" or "wild" tags.


Ainsley Harriott Cup Soup Wonderfully Wild Mushroom (4 per pack - 88g)
Ainsley Harriott Cup Soup Wonderfully Wild Mushroom (4 per pack - 88g)
Offered by Cooking Marvellous
Price: £2.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not mushroom for shitake..., 13 Feb. 2015
I suppose one must try to avoid expecting too much when it comes to cup-soups, but in this particular case Ainsley does at least manage to provide something that tastes like a typical cream-of-mushroom cuppa. Nothing to get too annoyed at, the texture is faux-creamy and the taste faux-mushroomy. Perhaps a little too salty for me but that's more likely a matter of taste. Not a bad effort, but don't get too excited by the "premium" or "wild" tags.


Ainsley Harriot Chicken and Leek Soup (Pack of 9)
Ainsley Harriot Chicken and Leek Soup (Pack of 9)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Clucking bell, 13 Feb. 2015
To begin with I found it extremely hard to detect any trace of chicken in this soup. Sure enough there was plenty of evidence of leek which, for some strange reason, had an oddly disconcerting taste of Fairy Liquid.

There were even some of those little cardboardy red squares that seem to turn up in almost every cup-a-soup that claims a vegetable heritage. I can only imagine that there's a small factory in Byelorus or Prestatyn which employs the local ne'er-do-wells to snip up sheets of red cartridge paper into the regulation 5.76mm tesseri and then ships them off to Campbell's, Heinz, Batchelor's and the estimable Mr H for use in minestroni, veggie soup etc etc.

However, it wasn't until I reached the bottom of the mug that I encountered a large, tumorously fibrous mass of something that tasted like the world's oldest, gamiest chicken. I can only be thankful that the old girl had passed away. Had she been allowed to live she would no doubt have climbed up some nearby skyscraper and would, even now, be swatting down bi-planes and artillery shells with her enormous, radiation-mutated wings.

Actually, perhaps that would have been a better outcome for mankind all 'round. It would certainly have been desirable to the Chicken-That-Ate-Prestatyn actually entering the food chain.

Not one of Ainsley's better efforts. And as for the "Scottish" tagline... I think the less said, the better.


Ainsley Harriott Chicken & Leek Soup 12x20g
Ainsley Harriott Chicken & Leek Soup 12x20g
Offered by Emaan Limited
Price: £8.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Clucking bell, 13 Feb. 2015
To begin with I found it extremely hard to detect any trace of chicken in this soup. Sure enough there was plenty of evidence of leek which, for some strange reason, had an oddly disconcerting taste of Fairy Liquid.

There were even some of those little cardboardy red squares that seem to turn up in almost every cup-a-soup that claims a vegetable heritage. I can only imagine that there's a small factory in Byelorus or Prestatyn which employs the local ne'er-do-wells to snip up sheets of red cartridge paper into the regulation 5.76mm tesseri and then ships them off to Campbell's, Heinz, Batchelor's and the estimable Mr H for use in minestroni, veggie soup etc etc.

However, it wasn't until I reached the bottom of the mug that I encountered a large, tumorously fibrous mass of something that tasted like the world's oldest, gamiest chicken. I can only be thankful that the old girl had passed away. Had she been allowed to live she would no doubt have climbed up some nearby skyscraper and would, even now, be swatting down bi-planes and artillery shells with her enormous, radiation-mutated wings.

Actually, perhaps that would have been a better outcome for mankind all 'round. It would certainly have been desirable to the Chicken-That-Ate-Prestatyn actually entering the food chain.

Not one of Ainsley's better efforts. And as for the "Scottish" tagline... I think the less said, the better.


Ainsley Harriott Cup Soup Scottish Style Chicken & Leek (4 per pack - 80g)
Ainsley Harriott Cup Soup Scottish Style Chicken & Leek (4 per pack - 80g)
Offered by Cooking Marvellous
Price: £2.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Clucking bell, 13 Feb. 2015
To begin with I found it extremely hard to detect any trace of chicken in this soup. Sure enough there was plenty of evidence of leek which, for some strange reason, had an oddly disconcerting taste of Fairy Liquid.

There were even some of those little cardboardy red squares that seem to turn up in almost every cup-a-soup that claims a vegetable heritage. I can only imagine that there's a small factory in Byelorus or Prestatyn which employs the local ne'er-do-wells to snip up sheets of red cartridge paper into the regulation 5.76mm tesseri and then ships them off to Campbell's, Heinz, Batchelor's and the estimable Mr H for use in minestroni, veggie soup etc etc.

However, it wasn't until I reached the bottom of the mug that I encountered a large, tumorously fibrous mass of something that tasted like the world's oldest, gamiest chicken. I can only be thankful that the old girl had passed away. Had she been allowed to live she would no doubt have climbed up some nearby skyscraper and would, even now, be swatting down bi-planes and artillery shells with her enormous, radiation-mutated wings.

Actually, perhaps that would have been a better outcome for mankind all 'round. It would certainly have been desirable to the Chicken-That-Ate-Prestatyn actually entering the food chain.

Not one of Ainsley's better efforts. And as for the "Scottish" tagline... I think the less said, the better.


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