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Tea Infuser
Tea Infuser
Offered by Nothing but Tea Ltd
Price: 5.40

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Avez vous une cuppa?, 6 Feb 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Tea Infuser (Kitchen & Home)
A fiver seems like a lot to pay for a piece of plastic and some metal gauze. On the other hand, the gauze is very fine so presumably doesn't come that cheap.

The basket is 6cm in diameter and the lugs that sit on the rim of your mug are 9.5cm so the infuser can be used in a mug anywhere between those two sizes. Obviously the basket won't sit comfortably in a large mug (10cm diameter or more), but presumably will still be usable. It's 7cm deep so won't work so well in cups.

So the infuser works great - the gauze lets the water in and the tea out and keeps all but the finest of tea dust through into your mug, so what you actually get is a fine cuppa and, of course, looseleaf is so much better than the teabags.

I also had no idea that you can re-use looseleaf tea, so the infuser provides an excellent means of storing the leaves until your next cup.

The infuser /is/ plastic but it seems quite robust.

See the uploaded photos


Doctor Who - The Complete Series 3 Box Set [DVD] [2007]
Doctor Who - The Complete Series 3 Box Set [DVD] [2007]
Dvd ~ David Tennant
Price: 14.54

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not firing on all cylinders, 5 Feb 2014
Doctor Who needs little introduction - a TV sci-fi series that started way back in the 1960's that ran more or less continuously until the late 1980's and was required Saturday night viewing for generations of British kids. It was notable for it's scary monster of the week theme, the changing title role, the Doctor's slightly ramshackle mode of conveyance and the variety of "Doctor's Companions". Sadly, it was also notable for it's limited budget, wobbly sets and man-in-a-rubber-suit aliens. However, despite its failings, it gained a special place in the nation's conciousness and is looked back on with fondness by many.

After a seventeen year break, the series restarted in 2005 with new writers, Doctors and companions and it has gone from strength to strength since.

This, the third series of the new run of Doctor Who is a patchy affair, veering wildly between good and (sorry about this) terrible, even within individual episodes. The episode listing is:

- "Smith and Jones"
- "The Shakespeare Code"
- "Gridlock"
- "Daleks in Manhattan"
- "Evolution of the Daleks"
- "The Lazarus Experiment"
- "42"
- "Human Nature"
- "The Family of Blood"
- "Blink"
- "Utopia"
- "The Sound of Drums"
- "Last of the Time Lords"

The rather lovely Martha (Freema Agyeman) makes her debut as The Doctor's new companion and her nose is immediately put out of joint by the Doc who is on the rebound from losing Rose. Sadly, too much is made of this - it persists as a minor theme through the entire season and it undermines Martha as a character and Ms Agyeman as a performer. Neither recover from the slight and it's no surprise that they depart at the end of the season.

As I said, there is good and bad to the episode listing, but yet again, the large part of the action takes place on the exotic and exciting planet of... earth. To be honest, the teasers at the end of each episode are becoming a bit of a disappointment when it becomes clear that, yes, it's bloody Earth yet again. That said, one of the best episodes - "Blink" is firmly rooted on our home planet, and in the current timeframe at that. It's a very well scripted and plotted story, poignant and exciting by turns. Quite apart from the genuinely scary baddies (not, I'm afraid, a given in the series), putting the incredibly winsome Carey Mulligan front and centre was clearly a masterstroke. That The Doctor barely features is (ahem) no bad thing.

Contrast this with The Lazarus Experiment. Now, I do appreciate Mark Gatis' points as a dramatic actor - he makes a grand, old school baddie - but he's catastrophically let down by a plot that doesn't so much borrow from The Fly as pillage it shamelessly (and for neither the first nor last time, I'm sad to say) and by a CGI monster that deserves a Golden Raspberry with Oak Leaves and Crossed Spoons.

The Daleks make their obligatory reappearance in a 2-parter. The plot here takes a moderately interesting turn by stripping the head pepperpot of his armour and putting him in - of all things - a pinstripe suit. Unfortunately I struggled to get past the bit where black characters are made out to be respected members - even leaders - of a happy multiracial community. I despise historical revisionism of this sort. It's no less egregious in a programme that is aimed at younger viewers who may not know any better.

"Human Nature/Family of Blood" is another 2-parter and not a bad 'un, either. Possibly my favourite part was Harry Lloyd's Flashman impression. I had NO idea until I Googled him that he went on to play GoT's Viserys Targaryen (I KNEW I recognised him!). The episodes have some real tension built in and even a bit of romance and it's only let down by the (yawn) rather prosaic location and (yawn yawn) the scarecrow monsters. Don't waste bullets! Chuck lit matches at 'em, for heavens' sake!

The final 3 part series introduces us to a new-old baddie (I shan't spoil the surprise). Again, the balance sheet is finely... balanced. Apparently, earth in the year six-squillion is populated by humans who /still/ haven't evolved. There are still internal combustion engined vehicles and Kalashnikov rifles. However, the universe is dying - a jolly decent premise which is gaily chucked out of the Tardis' window when our heroes simply pop back to 21st century earth to complete the story.

I'm afraid I can only give this season three stars - "It's OK". The bad points are many and lamentable but at least they are saved by a few outstanding positives.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 6, 2014 8:41 AM GMT


Moleskine Pocket Size Plain Hard Notebook - Green
Moleskine Pocket Size Plain Hard Notebook - Green
Offered by BOOKS etc
Price: 2.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More useful than a chocolate teapot, 2 Feb 2014
There's something deliciously decadent about shelling out this much cash for a simple notebook. In truth, unless your livelihood depends on being able to jot down notes on high quality paper, you can easily get away with a much cheaper alternative to the Moleskine brand. Heck. I even bought a Moleskine clone from Asda not so long ago. It was much the same size, had the same hard cover, the same expandable back pocket*, the same elastic band and ribbon page-marker. Even the paper had that rich creamy yellow colour and seemed to be just as "all that" as Moleskine's acid resistant product. And all for less than a couple of quid. Makes buying a real Moleskine a bit silly doesn't it? But then, Asda... Moleskine... Asda... Moleskine. Hmmm. Doesn't quite work does it?

At least with Moleskine you get a wee sticker and a leaflet with an enjoyably pretentious blurb to help you self-justify your ridiculous indulgence.

"The Moleskine notebook is a battery that stores ideas and feelings, releasing its energy over time." Ah! Now I understand!

This little chap fits happily into your breast pocket, just peeking out far enough to wink tantalisingly at people saying, "buy me!"

Damn. Now I'm beginning to sound like a Moleskine copywriter.

* What am I supposed to use that for?! My Orient Express ticket stub? My receipt from dinner at Megu's in Manhattan? Bill Clinton's business card? I normally just pop those into my elephant skin wallet.


Urban Fruit Golden Apricots 200 g (Pack of 8)
Urban Fruit Golden Apricots 200 g (Pack of 8)
Price: 11.92

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So much nicer than "ordinary" dried apricots, 31 Jan 2014
They have a lovely burnt sugar flavour to them that makes other brands taste bland and insipid. Plump and moist, they make an excellent mid-morning snack and I could eat them like sweets if they didn't have an unfortunate effect on one's.. err... digestive system if eaten to excess.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 31, 2014 11:53 AM GMT


Tenn Mens Winter Weight Cycling Race Jersey - Long Sleeve - Black/Yellow XL
Tenn Mens Winter Weight Cycling Race Jersey - Long Sleeve - Black/Yellow XL
Offered by Tenn Outdoors
Price: 29.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ride 'em cowboy!, 30 Jan 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have a 45"-46" chest and the XL size fits just fine. Worn with a t-shirt underneath it's not too tight, but not baggy either. The arms are a little long, but nothing problematic and the body length uis just right on me. There's a grippy tape around he hem which is very effective in preventing the body from riding up.

It's nice and comfy and warm enough to keep the chill out on a cold day. I don't know how well it'll fare in the very cold - the weather has been below water rather than below zero this winter in the UK. However, it feels like it should keep me just warm enough till I've got up to speed, as it were. Neither have I been rained on yet. However I shall report back anon.

Two deep, open pockets at the back are easily accessible and when I popped my mobile phone in one it felt pretty secure. There's also a little zip-up on the back but it's too small for anything larger than a house key or a very small moby. Overall quality seems good.

All in all, having coped with a heavy, non-wicking rugby shirt for many years of cycling, this is a big step up. The black/yellow/white colours are a bit headache-inducing, but at least make for good visibility.


Quaker Oatso Simple Original Porridge 27 g (Pack of 120)
Quaker Oatso Simple Original Porridge 27 g (Pack of 120)
Offered by REMI DIRECT
Price: 16.50

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does exactly what it says on the... sachet, 29 Jan 2014
About as healthy a breakfast as you can manage to get out of a packet. I have a special drawer at work full of these sachets and my morning routine is to cycle to work, make up a cuppa and a bowl of porridge and enjoy a quiet half hour of brekky at my desk.

As the review title says, this stuff really does do what it says on the tin. It's oats and not much else and it is simple to make up. Much simpler than "real" porridge done in the saucepan (half an hour to cook, 5 minutes to eat, an hour to clean the pan). I make this up with water instead of milk to keep it /really/ healthy and only add a half-teaspoon of sugar. A tiny pinch of salt would help the flavour but I do without.

Of course you can do what you like with this - add jam, syrup, dried fruit... I even tried adding pumpkin seeds & walnuts. Feckin' 'orrible it was.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 30, 2014 1:50 AM GMT


Moleskine Pocket Squared Notebook
Moleskine Pocket Squared Notebook
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More hip than an orthopaedic surgery operating theatre dustbin, 28 Jan 2014
There's something deliciously decadent about shelling out this much cash for a simple notebook. In truth, unless your livelihood depends on being able to jot down notes on high quality paper, you can easily get away with a much cheaper alternative to the Moleskine brand. Heck. I even bought a Moleskine clone from Asda not so long ago. It was much the same size, had the same hard cover, the same expandable back pocket*, the same elastic band and ribbon page-marker. Even the paper had that rich creamy yellow colour and seemed to be just as "all that" as Moleskine's acid resistant product. And all for less than a couple of quid. Makes buying a real Moleskine a bit silly doesn't it? But then, Asda... Moleskine... Asda... Moleskine. Hmmm. Doesn't quite work does it?

At least with Moleskine you get a wee sticker and a leaflet with an enjoyably pretentious blurb to help you self-justify your ridiculous indulgence.

"The Moleskine notebook is a battery that stores ideas and feelings, releasing its energy over time." Ah! Now I understand!

This little chap fits happily into your breast pocket, just peeking out far enough to wink tantalisingly at people saying, "buy me!"

Damn. Now I'm beginning to sound like a Moleskine copywriter.

* What am I supposed to use that for?! My Orient Express ticket stub? My receipt from dinner at Megu's in Manhattan? Bill Clinton's business card? I normally just pop those into my elephant skin wallet.


Moleskine Books - Pocket Ruled Notebook, Spine
Moleskine Books - Pocket Ruled Notebook, Spine
Offered by Glint
Price: 9.90

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cooler than Mother Teresa's sandals, 28 Jan 2014
There's something deliciously decadent about shelling out this much cash for a simple notebook. In truth, unless your livelihood depends on being able to jot down notes on high quality paper, you can easily get away with a much cheaper alternative to the Moleskine brand. Heck. I even bought a Moleskine clone from Asda not so long ago. It was much the same size, had the same hard cover, the same expandable back pocket*, the same elastic band and ribbon page-marker. Even the paper had that rich creamy yellow colour and seemed to be just as "all that" as Moleskine's acid resistant product. And all for less than a couple of quid. Makes buying a real Moleskine a bit silly doesn't it? But then, Asda... Moleskine... Asda... Moleskine. Hmmm. Doesn't quite work does it?

At least with Moleskine you get a wee sticker and a leaflet with an enjoyably pretentious blurb to help you self-justify your ridiculous indulgence.

"The Moleskine notebook is a battery that stores ideas and feelings, releasing its energy over time." Ah! Now I understand!

This little chap fits happily into your breast pocket, just peeking out far enough to wink tantalisingly at people saying, "buy me!"

Damn. Now I'm beginning to sound like a Moleskine copywriter.

* What am I supposed to use that for?! My Orient Express ticket stub? My receipt from dinner at Megu's in Manhattan? Bill Clinton's business card? I normally just pop those into my elephant skin wallet.


Moleskine Pocket Size Ruled Hard Notebook - Green
Moleskine Pocket Size Ruled Hard Notebook - Green
Price: 6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sexier than an oiled ballet dancer, 28 Jan 2014
There's something deliciously decadent about shelling out this much cash for a simple notebook. In truth, unless your livelihood depends on being able to jot down notes on high quality paper, you can easily get away with a much cheaper alternative to the Moleskine brand. Heck. I even bought a Moleskine clone from Asda not so long ago. It was much the same size, had the same hard cover, the same expandable back pocket*, the same elastic band and ribbon page-marker. Even the paper had that rich creamy yellow colour and seemed to be just as "all that" as Moleskine's acid resistant product. And all for less than a couple of quid. Makes buying a real Moleskine a bit silly doesn't it? But then, Asda... Moleskine... Asda... Moleskine. Hmmm. Doesn't quite work does it?

At least with Moleskine you get a wee sticker and a leaflet with an enjoyably pretentious blurb to help you self-justify your ridiculous indulgence.

"The Moleskine notebook is a battery that stores ideas and feelings, releasing its energy over time." Ah! Now I understand!

This little chap fits happily into your breast pocket, just peeking out far enough to wink tantalisingly at people saying, "buy me!"

Damn. Now I'm beginning to sound like a Moleskine copywriter.

* What am I supposed to use that for?! My Orient Express ticket stub? My receipt from dinner at Megu's in Manhattan? Bill Clinton's business card? I normally just pop those into my elephant skin wallet.


Moleskine Plain Pocket Notebook
Moleskine Plain Pocket Notebook
Price: 7.49

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Cooler than Mother Teresa's sandals, 28 Jan 2014
There's something deliciously decadent about shelling out this much cash for a simple notebook. In truth, unless your livelihood depends on being able to jot down notes on high quality paper, you can easily get away with a much cheaper alternative to the Moleskine brand. Heck. I even bought a Moleskine clone from Asda not so long ago. It was much the same size, had the same hard cover, the same expandable back pocket*, the same elastic band and ribbon page-marker. Even the paper had that rich creamy yellow colour and seemed to be just as "all that" as Moleskine's acid resistant product. And all for less than a couple of quid. Makes buying a real Moleskine a bit silly doesn't it? But then, Asda... Moleskine... Asda... Moleskine. Hmmm. Doesn't quite work does it?

At least with Moleskine you get a wee sticker and a leaflet with an enjoyably pretentious blurb to help you self-justify your ridiculous indulgence.

"The Moleskine notebook is a battery that stores ideas and feelings, releasing its energy over time." Ah! Now I understand!

This little chap fits happily into your breast pocket, just peeking out far enough to wink tantalisingly at people saying, "buy me!"

Damn. Now I'm beginning to sound like a Moleskine copywriter.

* What am I supposed to use that for?! My Orient Express ticket stub? My receipt from dinner at Megu's in Manhattan? Bill Clinton's business card? I normally just pop those into my elephant skin wallet.


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