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K. Leversuch (Brighton, UK)

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The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6)
The Silver Chair (The Chronicles of Narnia, Book 6)
by C. S. Lewis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.59

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good tale, 7 Oct 2009
the silver chair

Amazon synopsis:

The Narnia Chronicles, first published in 1950, remain some of the most enduringly popular ever published. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, has been translated into 29 languages! The illustrations in this book have been coloured by the original artist, Pauline Baynes. Now published with the original cover, as designed by Pauline Baynes. "We've got to go north," said Edmund, "and reach the ruins of a giant city." Prince Rilian, Caspian's beloved son, has mysteriously disappeared, and Jill and Eustace are brought into Narnia by Aslan, the great Lion, to find him. But an evil enchantress has dire plans for the prince, and for Narnia...This is the sixth adventure in the exciting Chronicles of Narnia.

I enjoyed this book. It is the sixth book in The Chronicles of Narnia series and good fun. We met Eustace in the previous book and he has grown up and is more likable in this adventure. The children are on a mission to find the lost Prince, and as ever C.S. Lewis fills the story with all kinds of excitment and perils, such as the underground world and the giants city.

Even as an adult I enjoyed this book, and the series. They contain everything you could want - a good storyline, likable characters and well written verse. This is a fantasy adventure, and thoroughly worth reading. It is a gripping book, and I wanted to see how Lewis would complete this particular tale.

My favourite character is the Marshwiggle Puddlegum. He made me laugh - especially as he is so negative and yet believed he was the most upbeat of them all!

I would recommend this book to everyone - adults and children alike.

8/10


Expect a Move of God in Your Life...Suddenly!
Expect a Move of God in Your Life...Suddenly!
by Joyce Meyer
Edition: Paperback

18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Helpful book, 10 Sep 2009
This is a nifty little book from Meyer. Only 60 pages long but full of good advice. Meyer looks at hearing from God - how we need to be silent and patient and how we should expect a move of God suddenly - how He works on his time frame not ours. This book has personal stories in which are encouraging, and although only a small book she imparts wisdom and has made me consider my prayer life and she has helped raise my expectations. I can confidfently say I am now more open to God moving suddenly, and am looking forward to the surprises!

This is well written and only took an hour or so to read. I liked how she was honest and shared stories of her life to help people grasp what she was saying. I found this a helpful book and well worth a quick read.

8/10


Pemberley
Pemberley
by Emma Tennant
Edition: Paperback

2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Surprised, 7 Aug 2009
This review is from: Pemberley (Paperback)
Pemberley is a sequel to Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. The story is based at Darcy's Derbyshire mansion, where Elizabeth is now residing as his wife. Everything seems blissful - Darcy has been softened and loves doting on Elizabeth, but all is about to return to how things were before the wedding as it is Christmas, and everyone in the family are embarking on a trip to Pemberley. Elizabeth is very concerned: Jane is about to give birth, Wickham will be present, and what about her mother? Will she keep her cool? Will Darcy revert to his prideful, sullen self? Is Christmas going to be a disaster?

I was pleasantly surprised by this book. I was concerned that it would just be a copy of Pride and Prejudice, but it isn't. It holds it own, and although the characters are the same, as are the location, it is not the same as Pride and Prejudice.

I liked that Tennant was consistant with the characters - so Mr. Collins was as ridiculous as ever, and Mrs. Bennett as flamboyant as Austen wrote her. Tennant added new characters too, which I think helped her move away from Austen's work and helped her novel to develop on its own accord.

This is not a long book - it is under 200 pages. It was an easy and enjoyable read. I was drawn in and connected with the wonderful characters again. I was eager to find out what would happen in the end. The story was a fun read but I did think the ending was a bit rushed. However, I will be looking to read Tennant's new installment: Pemberley Revisited.

If you like Pride and Prejudice I don't think you will be disappointed by this novel. Obviously not as good as the original it is a great follow up book.

8/10


The Time Machine (Penguin Classics)
The Time Machine (Penguin Classics)
by H.G. Wells
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.79

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Adventure, 23 July 2009
Synopsis from Amazon:

When a Victorian scientist propels himself into the year 802,701 AD, he is initially delighted to find that suffering has been replaced by beauty, contentment and peace. Entranced at first by the Eloi, an elfin species descended from man, he soon realises that this beautiful people are simply remnants of a once-great culture - now weak and childishly afraid of the dark. They have every reason to be afraid: in deep tunnels beneath their paradise lurks another race descended from humanity - the sinister Morlocks. And when the scientist's time machine vanishes, it becomes clear he must search these tunnels, if he is ever to return to his own era.

In Victorian London, a man known only as The Time Traveller has beaten the odds and made a time machine. He transports himself to the year 802,701 to find out what the world will be like in the future. He discovers two races, the fearful Eloi and the scary Morlocks. It seems the latter, who hide in the darkness of the underground tunnels have taken his time machine. The Time Traveller has to go on quite an adventure to relocate his ticket home.

This was a quick book, and fairly enjoyable, however, Wells makes quite a dire prediction of the future. He writes that humans will split into two races: one will be childish and the other evil. I did not relate to the characters well, yet I wanted to know what happened. Some people have referred to this book as a social commentary but for me it was an adventure book. The Time Traveller had dark roads to travel and all sorts of beings to fight if he wished to get to his era.

I think it is clear why it is a classic. It has elements of excitment and it Wells has thought outside the box to write this book. Although not the best classic around I think this is a book worth reading.

7/10


Blest Atheist
Blest Atheist
by Elizabeth Mahlou
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Great honest book, 28 Jun 2009
This review is from: Blest Atheist (Paperback)
This is the story of Elizabeth Mahlou's life. It is harrowing and encouraging. She is honest, realistic and humble. The book begins with Beth telling us about how she spoke at a Russian Orthodox church about her role as a Good Samaritan in helping Shura, a boy in Siberia with Spina Bifida. The book is full of how she meets people, how she connects and copes in different countries and how her contacts and friends enable her to help many people. She has multiple degrees, can talk a range of languages and has many fascinating stories, such as how she was one of the only American's allowed in Russia during the Cold War. Yet she does not brag and is not big headed. She is honest and humbled by her truely amazing experiences. She sees all of them as a chance to help others. She talks about her family and the abuse all her siblings suffered from different family members but how they supported each other and looked out for each other, and ultimately survived.

The second part of her book examines how she changed from an atheist to a practising Christian. She talks about how God has always rescued her, had a plan and loved her. How all the "coincidences" in her life were likely to be from God. She relays miracles she has seen, the faith of others and how ultimately her life was changed.

This is an amazing read. Even if you aren't interesting in God or religion this book is inspiring and beautiful. Many lives have been changed through Mahlou's work, and I think maybe will be changed by this book. This is a must read.

9/10


Bones to Ashes
Bones to Ashes
by Kathy Reichs
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good crime novel, 23 May 2009
This review is from: Bones to Ashes (Paperback)
I have only just started reading crime novels and this is the first Kathy Reich's book I have read - and it certainly encourages me to read more of this genre and more of her work.

In this novel, Tempe is working with several skeletons - most of them from Ryan's missing girls and cold cases. Except, it all gets a little personal. When a young girl her friend disappeared without a trace, and Tempe worries that one of the skeletons is her friend. With this in mind, she and her sister start their own investigation, which leads them into danger....

This was an exciting book with plenty of turns and twists and I didn't work out the ending. It seemed very realistic - full of scientific knowledge and crime knowledge. Reich's writing is engaging and gripping. She writes about more than just the crimes, there is love and friendship and family explored too, adding depth to an already good book. Through these she is able to explore the characters more fully.

My only complaints were lots of the conversation was in French, which then had to be translated, and there was so much science I didn't understand! Other than that, this was a good book and well worth reading.

8/10


The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith
The Prodigal God: Recovering the Heart of the Christian Faith
by Timothy Keller
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Christian manual, 17 May 2009
This is the first Tim Keller book I have read, and I found it very useful in my walk with God. Keller looks at an alternative way of looking at the parable of the prodigal son. He looks at the elder brother - the one who didn't take his inheritance, run off and shame the family. In that parable, the father shows amazing grace and love and forgives the younger son completely. The elder brother however, does not. Keller explains how Christianity is not a religion - where you follow rules, like the elder brother to get into heaven. He explores how it is by God's grace and Jesus' death and resurrection that we are saved. The elder brother did not have a relationship with his father, he was bitter - just like the pharasees. He followed rules and was into legalism. Keller explains how that is something we need to break out of - that won't bring us salvation.

This is a short book that clearly explains the Gospel message and how to adapt ourselves to live in relationship with the Father. I did dip in and out of this book, which was not a problem. It is a book that will get re-read. I did find however that when I was reading it, to take it in I had to give the book my full attention.

My fiancee started the book this afternoon and is already half way through - that is a good indication of how readable it can be - especially as he is not a big reader.

8/10


An Ice Cold Grave
An Ice Cold Grave
by Charlaine Harris
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

5.0 out of 5 stars Great third book, 17 May 2009
This review is from: An Ice Cold Grave (Paperback)
an ice cold grave

Synopsis from Amazon:

Harper Connelly was struck by lightning as a teenager, and now she can find the dead. In her third case, Harper and Tolliver, her stepbrother, are hired to find a missing grandson. But the truth is far worse than a single dead child, for numerous teenage boys, all unlikely runaways, have disappeared from Doraville, North Carolina. Harper soon finds the eight bodies, buried in the half-frozen ground, but then, still reeling from coming into contact with her first serial killer, she is attacked and injured. Now she and Tolliver have no choice but to stay in Doraville while she recovers, and as she reluctantly becomes part of the investigation, she learns more than she cares to about the dark mysteries and long-hidden secrets of the town: knowledge that makes her the most likely person to be next to end up in an ice-cold grave.

This is the third book in Harris' Harper Connelly series, and of course, is as good as the other two - both of which I gave top-ratings too.

In this installment, Harper is in South Carolina. The grandmother of a missing teenage boy has contacted them to see if she can find his body. Not only does Harper find the body of one boy, she finds the bodies of eight. In this small town, a serial killer is at large. At once the place is swarming with police and the media. However, having had his dirty secret revealed by Harper, she is his next victim, and he lands her in hospital. Yet that is not the end of his man nor the investigation...

Well, this is by far the most creepy, what with it being a serial killer, who did horrific things to the boys before their deaths. Along with the suspense is an engaging and exciting book. Harris does not whip out of writing about the horrors of rape and torture - and although that is very sinister, it adds to the book. As ever, she continuesstory lines from the other two books - such as Tolliver's and Harper's changing relationship and their missing sister Cameron.

I love this series and am so looking forward to the next one, which is out later this year (2009). Harris is gripping and exciting. I love the way she writes and her characters. I enjoy reading about Harper, the realism in her physical pain and the way she becomes emotionally involved with the cases and the people. I highly recommend this book and the entire series.

10/10


Small Gods: (Discworld Novel 13) (Discworld Novels)
Small Gods: (Discworld Novel 13) (Discworld Novels)
by Terry Pratchett
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Another Discworld great, 12 May 2009
Meet Brutha. He is not overly intelligent - in fact people think he is a bit nuts. But that might be because his god is trapped inside a tortoise, one he is carrying around and talking to. As it happens, he is right; and his mission, find some philosophers who can get the god out. Aroad trip is in order. Along the way they experience horrors such as the sea god, ship wrecks and war. All in all, another Discworld extravagant adventure, full of fantasy, humour and anticipation.

This is book thirteen in the Discworld series. I did not enjoy this one as much as others I have read. That said, this book is still funny and worth reading. Pratchett takes you into a fantasy world, filled with gods, all whom need followers to survive. As ever, his writing style is such that I was easily transported to the Discworld and remained focused and interested in the book.

I like to see characters who featured in other books pop up, and this is the case. The most persistant character is Death - who of course had me laughing, and Dibbler - that man is funny too, with the way he tries to bargin with everyone, gods included. Brutha was a great character too, even though this is the only book he will feature in. His simple nature, and his faithfulness to his god made him an enjoyable and humorous read.

Overall, although not the funniest book in this series, I did enjoy this book and would recommend it to anyone.

7/10


Grave Sight (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
Grave Sight (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
by Charlaine Harris
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Must read, 28 April 2009
I really enjoyed this book. It is the first Harris book I have read and I was gripped. We are introduced to Harper Connelly and her step-brother Tolliver. Having been struck by lightning at the age of 15 Harper was left with a unique gift - she finds dead people. This talent takes her to Sarne to find the body of a missing teenager. When found however, the town goes nuts. To separate Tolliver and Harper, Tolliver is arrested and thrown in jail, and Harper has several attacks on her life. In the midst of this, she does some investigating work, and this small town reveals some dark secrets...

This is the first book in the Harper Connelly series, and if all the books are this good, we will be in luck! This is an exciting, engaging and gripping book. I really enjoyed how Harris wrote. Even though Harper's talent is questionable, I found myself pulled into the story and believing what was written. I was trying to solve the mystery too.

I enjoyed reading all the characters and the setting. I chuckled at the fact Sarne had been written as the stereotypical hill-billy small-town, with in-breding. That did make for a fun read! I thought the way Harper and Tolliver were written were great. I connected with both of them and liked how Harris wrote in their history so we understood them better.

I don't have any complaints about this book - I loved it. This is a must-read.

10/10


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