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Reg Harris: The rise and fall of Britain's greatest cyclist
Reg Harris: The rise and fall of Britain's greatest cyclist
by Robert Dineen
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £13.59

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It's Not Just About The Bike, 19 Mar. 2013
This is a beautifully written book about a fallen sporting icon. Dineen approaches his subject with both great sensitivity and a keen eye for the truth and paints a compelling picture of the post-war cycling scene and the furiously driven and deeply flawed man who dominated it. Avoiding the clear temptation of either hatchet job or hagiography, he's written a book for both cycling fanatics and general readers. Highly recommended.


Keynes: The Return of the Master
Keynes: The Return of the Master
by Robert Skidelsky
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, shame about the proofreading!, 18 Aug. 2011
This is a fabulous and incredibly concise introduction to Keynes, a great primer for several schools of economics, and a pithy analysis of the economic troubles we find ourselves in. It would easily be a 5-star review if it weren't for the fact that my paperback edition is littered with typos, mis-spellings and some sentences which don't even make any sense. Sort it out Penguin!


The Phantom of the Open: Maurice Flitcroft, The World's Worst Golfer
The Phantom of the Open: Maurice Flitcroft, The World's Worst Golfer
by Scott Murray
Edition: Paperback

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I'm not a golf fan but..., 14 Dec. 2010
...I love this book! It's beautifully written and made me laugh more times than I care to remember, and even shed a few tears. For any hacker who believes passion and persistence can trump dull talent, and anyone who's struggled against humourless bureaucracy, Maurice Flitcroft is the Che Guevara of the fairways. At times it rattles along like a Seventies sitcom, but the writers never lose their warmth towards Maurice, and leave you feeling that a world without characters like him would be a much, much poorer one. Highly recommended.


The Pleasure is All Mine: Selfish Food for Modern Life
The Pleasure is All Mine: Selfish Food for Modern Life
by Suzanne Pirret
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.99

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sassy, sexy and great fun, 27 July 2009
I have cookbooks that I will use more often, but few that I enjoy more this. Rattlingly well-written with some wonderfully indulgent recipes, Suzanne Pirret is the lovechild of Anthony Bourdain and Angelina Jolie.

Not one to give a kid who can't boil an egg as a going to university present perhaps, but if you love food, and believe you need a shamelessly selfish treat, this comes highly recommended.


Day of the Match: A History of Football in 365 Days
Day of the Match: A History of Football in 365 Days
by Rowan Walker
Edition: Hardcover

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For fans of the Fiver, and more!, 9 Feb. 2009
I bought this on the strength of Scott Murray's hilarious and anarchic writing for the Guardian online's Fiver column. However this is a much straighter proposition, but no worse for it. A selection of fascinating anecdotes about teams and players you know and a lot you won't. It's well-written enough to pull in the casual reader, but with enough authority to satisfy the most anoraky fan.

Football books are two a penny, so finding a really good one like this is well worth shouting about.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 13, 2010 6:25 PM GMT


Bernard Sumner: Confusion - Joy Division, Electronic and New Order Verus the World: Confusion - Joy Division, Electronic and New Order Versus the World
Bernard Sumner: Confusion - Joy Division, Electronic and New Order Verus the World: Confusion - Joy Division, Electronic and New Order Versus the World
by David Nolan
Edition: Paperback

10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Brave but flawed, 19 Mar. 2008
This isn't quite the exhaustive piece of research it boasts it is. Nolan hasn't really penetrated Barney's inner circle and relies heavily on press cuttings, anecdotes from the HAcienda's glass collectors and an embittered old schoolfriend. His lumbering prose doesn't help much either. Suffice to say, he's no Ian MacDonald!
But if you're a Joy Div/ New Order fanatic like me, I'd still recommend it. It throws up some interesting, previously undocumented facts about the man, and presents a sketchy, but fascinating, picture of a modest, prickly and complex unsung genius. I guess the real USP here is the responses he's printed from Bernard to some of the anecdotes - they start off as acerbic and witty and become increasingly indignant as the book goes on!

Not a classic, but ten times more likeable, readable and original than Paul Morley's wretched, smug Joy Division book.


Joy Division: Piece by Piece: Writing About Joy Division 1977-2007
Joy Division: Piece by Piece: Writing About Joy Division 1977-2007
by Paul Morley
Edition: Paperback

19 of 27 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Overblown, repetitious, pretentious guff, 9 Jan. 2008
Joy Division is probably more important to me than any other group, but the band are ill-served by this hastily assembled mix of Morley's flat, prosaic early writing, and, worse still, his pompous later musings - his attempt to mimic the style of JG Ballard's Atrocity Exhibition is particularly risible. His specialty is to say something vacuous and then paraphrase himself three times. Many of the pieces are repetitious, some barely mention the band at all. What they have in common is that they are chiefly about the writer himself.

I've enjoyed some of Morley's writing in the past, and found his Words and Music book largely infuriating, but with some glimmer of wit, but this is a waste of time. There is more of worth in the 2-3 pages Simon Reynolds writes about the band in the brilliant Rip It Up... than there is in this entire book.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 20, 2008 3:46 PM GMT


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