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Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Issue 4 B "Global Conquest Edition" Jan 2012 IDW
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Issue 4 B "Global Conquest Edition" Jan 2012 IDW
by Kevin Eastman & Tom Waltz
Edition: Comic

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars "Change is Constant" issue #4, 17 Sep 2014
The stories from issues #1-4 of IDW's new series of `Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' comic are collected as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Volume 1: Change is Constant.

Issue #4 opens with Casey and Raphael having been lured into a trap by Old Hob's henchmen. Raphael's memory of his mutation comes back to him when he is confronted by Hob. The flashback to the lab crime scene sees Hob, following his mutation, volunteering to retrieve the missing Turtles and rat, in exchange for a financial consideration... Back in the present, as the two would-be heroes succumb to superior numbers, help arrives, and the Turtles are reunited for the final showdown...


Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Volume 1: Change is Constant
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Volume 1: Change is Constant
by Dan Duncan
Edition: Paperback
Price: 9.45

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My first Mutant Turtle comic, 17 Sep 2014
The stories from issues #1-4 of IDW's new series of `Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles' comic are collected as Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Volume 1: Change is Constant. This is my first Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comic, despite having read comic books for over 50 years. I have no idea what the `real' origin of the characters is, nor whether this is a brand-new origin, or a retelling of the original. However, it was an entertaining comic, though a quick read, as it lasted only a bus journey from Bricklayers Arms to Regent Street. The artwork is a bit cartoony - but no more than recent Spider-Man stories - and the story and scripting is reasonable, though I am getting a bit tired of mystic oriental masters preaching inner peace while practicing external violence.

The story opens with three Turtles and their Zen-rat master Splinter facing off against mutant Cat street-gang leader Old Hob in a turf war, interspersed with flashbacks to a laboratory where secret genetic experiments are under way, and co-incidentally housing a tank with four baby turtles, and a lab-rat who is free to wander about while testing psychotropic drugs are tested on him... The fourh Turtle is missing, and while the band of brothers searches for him, he is wandering the streets of New York in search of food and shelter. He stumbles upon an abusive father beating his (teenage) son, and steps in to help. The teenage son turns out to be a masked vigilante of sorts, and gradually all three stories start to join up, as we see a break-in at the lab where the baby turtles, rat and passer-by alley cat get doused in various secret super-soldier serums being stolen by masked ninjas as the rat manages to defeat them al, though the cat gets away with one Turtle... The super-soldier serums mutate the Turtles, rat and cat into humanoid forms (with innate language skills and knowledge of pizza), and the two main factions establish themselves as rivals. Eventually, everybody meets up in the finale and the Turtles are reunited. Meanwhile, still in the background, there is a mysterious general who has been financing the experiments, and the mysterious masked ninjas who broke into the lab. Bearing in mind that this is a comic book, the story hung together reasonably well, and was entertainingly told. I shall certainly read further volumes if they present themselves at my local library.


[(Action! Mystery! Thrills!: 200 Great Comic Book Covers 1936-45 )] [Author: Greg Sadowski] [Jan-2012]
[(Action! Mystery! Thrills!: 200 Great Comic Book Covers 1936-45 )] [Author: Greg Sadowski] [Jan-2012]
by Greg Sadowski
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars All in colour, for a dime!, 17 Sep 2014
Action! Mystery! Thrills! Comic Book Covers from the Golden Age 1933-1945, edited by Greg Sadowski, 208pp, 2011

This book reproduces a selection of 176 covers of American comic books from 1933-1945, chosen and annotated by Greg Sadowski. The covers are printed - slightly larger than life - one to a page, with the notes at the back of the book, along with mini-covers to identify which is which, grouped eight to a page.

In his Foreword, Ty Templeton reminds us it has been written that the Golden Age is when you are twelve. For me, that would have been 1968, and I was fascinated by the comic-book characters and stories being referenced and reprinted by both Marvel and DC comics from a legendary Golden Age over 20 years previously – I remember the ‘Flash of Two Worlds’ and the subsequent appearances of the Justice Society members in the pages of the Flash that sparked my quest for knowledge of the period. Now it is 40 years later, and we have Archives and Masterworks galore (and Alter Ego magazine); and it is still a fascinating subject.

Mr Templeton reminds us that the period covered here “was as unparalleled time of creativity, skill, and daring, this decade when comic books grew up. Though there was plenty of high craft and brilliance to come, never again did the medium advance on so grand a scale, and never has it been this much fun to discover that those who grew up with these comics were actually right. It turns out it was the Golden Age”.

“Witness it in the pages of this book: the Art Deco stylings of of Alex Schomburg, Jack Cole and Reed Crandall battling it out with the more intuitive Modernism of Joe Simon, Jack Kirby, and Charles Biro. The external realities of war and depression, counterbalanced by magic and fantasy, each vying for the public’s hearts, minds and dimes. The layouts, the logos, the limits of the printing technology, and the size of the product are tested and refined, with genres and audience coalescing at the same time. And we find that this period was so much more than superheroes, and all being done by master craftsmen at the top of their game…”

There are a few covers that I recognise, and some big-name characters appear, but the Editor has managed to find many that are new to me, both by well-known and lesser-known artists. It is an excellent collection, with extremely informative notes.


The Golden Age of DC Comics by Levitz, Paul ( AUTHOR ) Feb-10-2013 Hardback
The Golden Age of DC Comics by Levitz, Paul ( AUTHOR ) Feb-10-2013 Hardback
by Paul Levitz
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A treasure trove of Golden Age art and illustrations, 17 Sep 2014
This is a ‘coffee table’ book – one that you need to rest on a small table to read comfortably (or screw four legs on to make a coffee-table). It is primarily a collection of comic-book covers, comics’ pages and other illustrations and photographs from and about the period 1935-56 – the Golden Age of comic books.

The Contents are –
P006: Interview with Joe Kubert by Paul Levitz
P014: A Super Hero is Born
P054: The Golden Age
P412: Index
P414: Bibliography
P415: Credits
P416: Acknowledgements

Joe Kubert was one of the few DC Comics’ Golden Age artists still active (at the time of publication). The next chapter is a short overview of the origins and early days of comics and comic books – particularly DC Comics, which includes early sketches of the proposed Superman character by Siegel and Shuster, who also appear to have coined the term ‘Super Hero’. The final and main section is a collection of annotated illustration of Golden Age comics, photographs and artefacts – but primarily comics.

If you are a fan of the early comic books, this will be an interesting volume to look through. My first exposure to the Golden Age came in the 1960s when Julius Schwartz began to reintroduce the Golden Age DC heroes in the Flash, with the pretext that they were living on a parallel-world to the modern DC heroes. I was fascinated by them, and that led to my life-long interest in this period of comics.

Favourite illustration – Aquaman throwing a polar bear at seal-poachers.


Velvet Volume 1 TP
Velvet Volume 1 TP
by Ed Brubaker
Edition: Paperback
Price: 5.25

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The spy who married me…, 17 Sep 2014
This review is from: Velvet Volume 1 TP (Paperback)
The story running through issues #1-5 of Image Comics’ ongoing title ‘Velvet’ is collected as Velvet Volume 1 TP. This is a superb new spy series from Ed Brubaker and Steve Epting, set in the 1970s, but with plenty of flashbacks covering the period back to the war, as we see what we assume is a British (but possibly Anglo-American – “Allied Reconnaissance Commission”) super-spy organisation busy fighting the bad guys. I say super-spy, but we only see one piece of advanced technology, deployed in issue #2 and not seen again. The organisation is based in London, hence my assumption it is British, but as it is written and illustrated by Americans (as far as I know), and occasionally some Americanisms (or at least references) creep in, but so minor as to be almost un-noticeable, and considering that they manage to get the Bricklayer’s Arms railway station into one panel (which is now long gone, but was there in the period of the story) which was just across the road from one of my local libraries, and whose site I have been looking for, I can forgive them anything.

The story opens with the ARC’s top agent being assassinated, and the evidence pointing to an ex-agent as the killer. However, the boss’s secretary, Velvet Templeton, a lady of a certain age, has been going over the various reports with a fine-tooth comb as they cross her desk on their way to her boss, and she spots a discrepancy here and there, leading her to suspect someone has been framed. When she goes to investigate, she finds the suspect dead, and the investigating team burst in just in time to find her leaning over the body… What they (and we) don’t know, until people start flying through windows, is that Miss Moneypenny (for it is fairly obvious who she and the first dead agent are based on) is the Moneypenny of “Skyfall”, and soon we are off on a Bond adventure that takes us across 1970s Europe as Velvet follows the trail looking for clues to who is behind the plot, and her background as a field agent is slowly filled in as we go. Eventually the trail leads to a figure from her past, and another major twist in the tale…

This really is a superb story, set in a believable past, and playing with the world of Ian Fleming’s novels, rather than the films – though there are the odd references to those, as when Velvet is looking for a cigarette lighter in a car –
“Not that one! That’s not the lighter!”
“Is this a work car?”
We don’t know what the button is for, but we certainly know what a work car is.

THE SPOILER ZONE
THE SPOILER ZONE

Issue #1 opens in Paris in 1973, as a James Bond lookalike assassinates some tuxedo’d men in a rooftop restaurant, then makes his escape, only to be gunned-down as he reaches his silver Aston Martin...

Velvet Templeton is woken at 4AM and summoned to the London HQ of ARC-7 for a briefing on the death of their top field-agent in Paris. We get a bit of back story on her and the dead agent, as the investigation into his death concludes that a retired agent was responsible. But Velvet has been going through the dead agent’s paperwork, and spotted something missing. She suspects something is amiss, ad goes looking for the accused agent, only to find him dead, and she is discovered looming over the body by the investigating team…

Issue #2 opens with Sergeant Roberts reporting to Director Manning that his secretary, Velvet Templeton, has just beaten him and his men up when they tried to arrest her for treason, fled the scene of a (framed) murder, and after a big high-speed car chase through South London, eluded his elite pursuit squad. He would like to know how. It turns out that she was their top agent until she retired in 1956…

Meanwhile, Velvet has looked up an old acquaintance form those days, who she hopes will get her out of the country and on the trail of the clue she has found in the paperwork.

Issue #3 opens in a prison in Yugoslavia, which Velvet is breaking into… her acquaintance from the good old days has got her to Vienna, from where they go to Belgrade, where on a previous mission, the murdered agent X-14 seduced the wife of a Yugoslav general. Now Velvet needs to find her. After a bit of “field work”, we discover that the now ex-wife is in prison… where Velvet has gone to rescue her, in order to find out what X-14 discovered from her…

Issue #4 opens in ARC-7’s London office, where they suspect Velvet was involved in the recent deaths of a Yugoslav general and his ex-wife.

Meanwhile, Velvet is in Monaco for the Carnival of Fools, where she hopes to find the man that Marina the General’s ex-wife has put her on to. This is another figure from her days in the field, a former Soviet agent turned freelance, who is now being hunted by the KGB. He gives her another clue…

Issue #5 opens in the Bahamas in 1956, where Velvet is on honeymoon with her husband and fellow agent. We get the back-story of Velvet’s recruitment and training, and the discovery that her husband appears to be a traitor…

In the present (1974), Velvet discovers from the former Soviet agent that the dead husband was not working for them… She boards a flight for London.


VELVET #5
VELVET #5
by Ed Brubaker
Edition: Comic

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Velvet chapter five, 17 Sep 2014
This review is from: VELVET #5 (Comic)
The story running through issues #1-5 of Image Comics’ ongoing title ‘Velvet’ is collected as Velvet Volume 1 TP.

Issue #5 opens in the Bahamas in 1956, where Velvet is on honeymoon with her husband and fellow agent. We get the back-story of Velvet’s recruitment and training, and the discovery that her husband appears to be a traitor…

In the present (1974), Velvet discovers from the former Soviet agent that the dead husband was not working for them… She boards a flight for London.


VELVET #4
VELVET #4
by Ed Brubaker
Edition: Comic

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Velvet chapter four, 17 Sep 2014
This review is from: VELVET #4 (Comic)
The story running through issues #1-5 of Image Comics’ ongoing title ‘Velvet’ is collected as Velvet Volume 1 TP.

Issue #4 opens in ARC-7’s London office, where they suspect Velvet was involved in the recent deaths of a Yugoslav general and his ex-wife.

Meanwhile, Velvet is in Monaco for the Carnival of Fools, where she hopes to find the man that Marina the General’s ex-wife has put her on to. This is another figure from her days in the field, a former Soviet agent turned freelance, who is now being hunted by the KGB. He gives her another clue…


VELVET #3 (MR)
VELVET #3 (MR)
by Ed Brubaker
Edition: Comic

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Velvet chapter three, 17 Sep 2014
This review is from: VELVET #3 (MR) (Comic)
The story running through issues #1-5 of Image Comics’ ongoing title ‘Velvet’ is collected as Velvet Volume 1 TP.

Issue #3 opens in a prison in Yugoslavia, which Velvet is breaking into… her acquaintance from the good old days has got her to Vienna, from where they go to Belgrade, where on a previous mission, the murdered agent X-14 seduced the wife of a Yugoslav general. Now Velvet needs to find her. After a bit of “field work”, we discover that the now ex-wife is in prison… where Velvet has gone to rescue her, in order to find out what X-14 discovered from her…


VELVET #2 (MR)
VELVET #2 (MR)
by Ed Brubaker
Edition: Comic

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Velvet chapter 2, 17 Sep 2014
This review is from: VELVET #2 (MR) (Comic)
The story running through issues #1-5 of Image Comics’ ongoing title ‘Velvet’ is collected as Velvet Volume 1 TP.

Issue #2 opens with Sergeant Roberts reporting to Director Manning that his secretary, Velvet Templeton, has just beaten him and his men up when they tried to arrest her for treason, fled the scene of a (framed) murder, and after a big high-speed car chase through South London, eluded his elite pursuit squad. He would like to know how. It turns out that she was their top agent until she retired in 1956…

Meanwhile, Velvet has looked up an old acquaintance form those days, who she hopes will get her out of the country and on the trail of the clue she has found in the paperwork.


VELVET #1 (MR)
VELVET #1 (MR)
by Ed Brubaker
Edition: Comic

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Velvet chapter 1, 17 Sep 2014
This review is from: VELVET #1 (MR) (Comic)
The story running through issues #1-5 of Image Comics' ongoing title `Velvet' is collected as Velvet Volume 1 TP.

Issue #1 opens in Paris in 1973, as a James Bond lookalike assassinates some tuxedo'd men in a rooftop restaurant, then makes his escape, only to be gunned-down as he reaches his silver Aston Martin...

Velvet Templeton is woken at 4AM and summoned to the London HQ of ARC-7 for a briefing on the death of their top field-agent in Paris. We get a bit of back story on her and the dead agent, as the investigation into his death concludes that a retired agent was responsible. But Velvet has been going through the dead agent's paperwork, and spotted something missing. She suspects something is amiss, ad goes looking for the accused agent, only to find him dead, and she is discovered looming over the body by the investigating team...


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