Profile for 50 Squirrels of Grey > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by 50 Squirrels o...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 26
Helpful Votes: 17149

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
50 Squirrels of Grey (on a shed in St James Park, London. Bring nuts.)
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Insight Guides: Iceland
Insight Guides: Iceland
by Insight Guides
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.28

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A readable and colourful guide, 28 July 2015
This 352-page book - the March 2014 (7th) print edition - is a colourful and informative guide to Iceland - for real visitors and armchair travellers alike. It has all the usual features, with excellent maps - and a larger font than the Eyewitness guides (for example). There are excellent colour photos breaking up the text columns, and informative and easy to read articles and listings. It is a handy up-to-date guidebook, with its trademark ‘Insight’ articles and features on local history, culture and touristy stuff.

The Contents are -
P003: Introduction
P024: History
P061: Features (on local culture - people, cuisine, environment, etc.); and Insights (Mini Features & Photo Features) intermixed with the Places or other articles, to roughly match the subject.
P135: Places (14 entries)
P316: Travel Tips
P322: Accommodation
P331: Activities
P339: A-Z
P347: Language
P349: Further Reading
P352: Index


The Rough Guide to Europe on a Budget
The Rough Guide to Europe on a Budget
by Rough Guides
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A readable and informative guide, 28 July 2015
This 1200-page book - the 4th (print) edition of March 2014 - is an interesting and readable (the two are not always found together) guide to making budget-priced trips around Europe.

Unlike many guides, this is not a glossy booklet dotted with colourful photographs to make it look superficially attractive, but a (literally) rough guide in terms of comparative paper finishes, but well-designed and presented, with readable text, useful maps, and (well-chosen) photographs only where space allows. The excellent design and layout means that you don’t need unnecessary spot illustrations to break up column after column of small-printed data; and the page-edges are colour coded to match the Contents page listing, to make it easier to find the relevant chapter.

The Contents are
P004: Introduction (Where to go, when to go, what to see, etc.)
P028: Basics (travel, transport, accommodation, “work and study”, and other touristy stuff)

P047: The Guide (with the usual Rough Guide “Context” information listed within each country’s entry)
This features 36 chapters of varying size, arranged in alphabetic order, from Albania to Ukraine, and including Turkey and Morocco, so the publishers are optimistic about their entry into the European Union; Belgium and Luxembourg have to share a chapter though.

P1193: Index


All-New Ghost Rider Volume 2: Legend
All-New Ghost Rider Volume 2: Legend
by Felipe Smith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ghost Riders and family secrets, 28 July 2015
The story running through issues #6-12 of Marvel Comics' All New Ghost Rider is collected as All-New Ghost Rider Volume 2: Legend. This volume continues and concludes the story of the All-New Ghost Rider, as we meet the other Ghost Rider, Johnny Blaze, who wants to know who is taking his name in vain. We also discover some family secrets about the possessing spirit Eli Morrow, and why it was Robbie Reyes happened to get chosen, and it all ties together in a big climax when Eli decides to offer Gabe the change to be his host when Robbie tries to reign Eli in.

All of the ongoing sub-plots involving the school bullies and Mr Hyde's plans to take over the city's drug-gangs are all resolved, as well as Eli's quest for revenge on the gangsters who sacrificed him. The story is neatly tied-up ready for the next instalment, wherever and whenever that may appear.

The scripting is still as annoying as in the previous volume, All-New Ghost Rider Volume 1: Engines of Vengeance, with lots of asterisked-out swearing and incomprehensible (to us old people) street speech; and the artwork is just as incomprehensible also, though it does match the `spirit' of the story. If you enjoyed the first volume, then this is basically the second half of the story; if you didn't read the first volume, then don't start here, as there will be far too many spoilers affecting it.


Redditich & Evesham Line
Redditich & Evesham Line
by Bob Yate
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An interesting and readable study of a small section of railway history, 28 July 2015
This volume is an interesting and readable study of the 32-mile-long line from Barnt Green through Redditch and Evesham to Ashchurch. It was built by three separate companies, and opened in four stages between 1859 and 1868. The line partially closed in 1964, though some sections of it are still in service today, along with modern extensions. It originally linked the Midland Railway from a junction at Barnt Green with the GWR (at two separate junctions along its route) and the Stratford-on-Avon & Midland Junction Railway, before rejoining the Midland Railway at Ashchurch.

It is recommended for anyone interested in the history of branch lines, or of minor or regional railway history. This edition is 224 pages with photographs, maps and diagrams included in the text. It is No. 240 in the Oakwood Press' Locomotion Papers, from 2014.

The Contents are –
P005: Introduction
P012: The Reditch Railway
P035: The Evesham & Ashchurch Railway
P044: The Evesham & Redditch railway
P055: Connections at Broom Junction
P067: Description of the line
P135: Working the line from 1868 to 1964
P203: Modern Times
P218: Chronology
P221: Bibliography & Acknowledgements
P223: Index


Hulk: Future Imperfect (Incredible Hulk)
Hulk: Future Imperfect (Incredible Hulk)
by Marvel Comics
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Past imperfect, 28 July 2015
The stories collected in this volume - Hulk: Future Imperfect (Incredible Hulk) - are the two-part Future Imperfect (from 1993), and The End: The Hulk (a one-shot tile from a few years later).

The two- (double-sized) part Future Imperfect is set in a post atomic-war future, where the Hulk is the only super-powered character to have survived, and he has set up a little human community with himself as the ruler. The inevitable freedom fighters find Doctor Doom's time machine, and send agents back to recruit Bruce Banner (at the time, in control of the Hulk's body) to come forward and free them from the future Hulk.

This is a reasonably interesting story, but with too much `fake' future-speak, now as outdated as 1950s or `60s slang is to us. The art is the usual (i.e. superb) George Perez, though again, the future fashions of the 1990s also look dated. The story is quite god, and there is a discussion between the Hulks about alternative time-lines caused by time travel, which looks like it might come back to haunt us, as the writer of this story is also writing the current Hulk series, which will go into the upcoming Secret Wars event with the Hulk looking remarkably like the future Hulk in this story; what goes round...

The second story was part of a Marvel series back in the 1990s that looked at possible endings for their characters. This story, based on an earlier prose story by the writer, sees the Hulk walking alone through another post-atomic war landscape, this time without any other survivors than the occasional army of cockroaches. Occasionally, Banner gets to be the dominant figure, as he is slowly ageing, but the Hulk persona will not allow him to die. Eventually, Banner comes to realise that there is a mythological element to their intertwined lives, and sees a possible way out...

This was not as interesting as the first story to e, though it is probably the `better' of the two. Both, however, feel as if they have been left behind by history, as we today see the world probably ending in very different ways to those imagined twenty years ago.


Men of War, Vol. 1: Uneasy Company
Men of War, Vol. 1: Uneasy Company
by Tom Derenick
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Directionless stories, 28 July 2015
The stories running through issues #1-8 of DC Comics' `New 52' title "Men of War" is collected as Men of War, Vol. 1: Uneasy Company. This collection consists of a six-part "Uneasy Company" story, starring a New 52 Sergeant Rock, who is recruited for some sort of clandestine US Army unit, for which we get no background or explanation, which engages in a couple of missions in which they encounters super-human or super-natural characters, for which we get no background or explanation, and there is a team-member with some sort of superhuman power, for which we get no background or explanation. There are two stand-alone stories featuring US military personnel, and some back-up stories, including a Frankenstein (and SHADE) serial set in the Second World War.

The stand-alone stories and backups would make an average to good comic; the Sergeant Rock and the Frankenstein backups would have made a very poor comic. It is possible that the Uneasy Company story was going somewhere, but never reached its destination; but who cares. It didn't make it for a reason - it wasn't good enough to sustain a readership. Imagine a Garth Ennis war comic without the characterisation, plot, gore and foul language: difficult? Just look here.


Justice League International Volume 2: Breakdown TP
Justice League International Volume 2: Breakdown TP
by Dan Jurgens
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Justice League of Nowhere, 28 July 2015
The story running through issues #7-12 of DC Comics' `New 52' "Justice League International" title is collected, along with Annual #1, as Justice League International Volume 2: Breakdown TP. This is a definite improvement over the first volume; and although still remaining rooted in the style of the Old DC Universe, feels somehow less old fashioned; just enough to be more enjoyable. New members are introduced during the course of the story, with several of the last volume's members being in hospital for most of the story following the last-page explosion at the JLI's new headquarters. This story sees the team hunting down those responsible - a team of anarchists with 1970s costumes, powers, identities and motivations - which in turn leads to a meeting/confrontation/crossover with the Firestorms (though I don't know who was hoping to pick up new readers as a result), before a final resolution is reached, and a new HQ and purpose, as well as more new members. OMAC joins the team early on, and the Olympian and the Blue Beetle join at the very end, the Annual, just in time for the series to finish, with the Blue Beetle sent off into outer space (in the middle of his own second volume, without a reference back to this one), Kevin Cho freed form the OMAC entity, and Brother Eye making vague threats about a coming unstoppable menace - which two years later is revealed in NEW 52 FUTURES END TP VOL 01 (N52). Even that far back, DC were getting ready to abandon the New 52 and have yet another Crisis!

This was an entertaining volume, and the series was brought to a satisfying conclusion, with the team all set up for further adventures, which never happened. At least it was a tidy ending.


Walking the Jurassic Coast: Dorset and East Devon - The Walks, the Rocks, the Fossils (Cicerone Walking Guides)
Walking the Jurassic Coast: Dorset and East Devon - The Walks, the Rocks, the Fossils (Cicerone Walking Guides)
by Ronald Turnbull
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.05

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A detailed and colourful guide for walkers AND armchair travellers alike, 28 July 2015
This 240-page book - the first - 2015 - edition is a colourful, detailed and READABLE guide to walking the Jurassic Coast of Dorset and East Devon. It is a small (6 ¾ by 4 ½ inch) book, with superb full-colour maps and photos on almost every page. It describes 30 detailed circular walks (i.e. you end up back where you started from), with the relevant sections of the Ordnance Survey map (reproduced here bigger than it appears the OS sheet for ease of reading) for each walk, and with photographs taken on the route, showing you highlights of what to see along the way. There are also directions for short-cuts or alternative routes provided, and a running commentary on what you can see (or what you can go and see if you take “the path back right, signed for Sutton Poyntz” for example).

Note that, as well as the scenic views from these walks, this book is very focused on the geology of this region, and is subtitled “Dorset and East Devon: the walks, the rocks and the fossils” for a reason. Each walk’s chapter contains details of the rocks and fossils to be seen (and found) as you go, as well as text boxes containing detailed descriptions of features and history.

This really is a superb guide; and if you can’t take the journey in person, you can just read it for enjoyment.

The Contents are -
P008: Overview map
P010: Strata diagram
P012: Geologic topic index (what each walk will show you)
P015: Introduction
P021: Geological Introduction
P029: Devon’s Red Beds (7 walks)
P071: The Lias (Lyme Regis - 2 walks)
P086: Golden Cap (5)
P119: Chesil Beach (5)
P151: Chalk Walks: Lulworth and Inland (4)
P181: Lulworth Cove (2)
P191: Isle of Purbeck (5)
P221: Isle of Purbeck Circuit
P222: Route summary table (start/finish; OS grid reference; distance; ascent; time; page)
P224: Indoor Geology: Museums and visitor centres
P225: Rock reference
P226: Glossary of geological terms
P228: Timechart: Cambrian period to the present day
P229: Rocks of the Jurassic Coast
P232: Jurassic Coast cliff diagrams (showing the geology you will see on the walks)


Walking in the North Wessex Downs (Cicerone Walking Guides)
Walking in the North Wessex Downs (Cicerone Walking Guides)
by Steve Davison
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.05

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A detailed and colourful guide for walkers AND armchair travellers alike, 28 July 2015
This 188-page book - the first - 2015 - edition is a colourful, detailed and READABLE guide to walking the North Wessex Downs. It is a small (6 ¾ by 4 ½ inch) book, with superb full-colour maps and photos on at least every second page (and for much of the book on every page). It describes 30 detailed circular walks (i.e. you end up back where you started from), with the relevant sections of the Ordnance Survey map (reproduced here bigger than it appears the OS sheet for ease of reading) for each walk, and with photographs taken on the route, showing you highlights of what to see along the way, OR to give you navigation reference points (“keep right at the trees”). There are also directions for short-cuts or alternative routes provided, and a running commentary on what you can see (or what you can go and see if you take the alley down the side of the fire-station, for example).

This really is a superb guide; and if you can’t take the journey in person, you can just read it for enjoyment.

The Contents are -
P009: Introduction
P021: Berkshire Downs East (5 walks)
P047: Lambourn Downs (7)
P085: Marlborough Downs (6)
P121: Vale of Pewsey (6)
P153: North Hampshire Downs (6)
P194: Route summary table (start/finish; OS grid reference; distance; ascent; time; page)
P186: Useful contacts
P187: Further reading


Estonia (Bradt Travel Guides)
Estonia (Bradt Travel Guides)
by Neil Taylor
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A superb, readable guide, 28 July 2015
This 328-page book - the 7th edition of March 2014 - is a superb readable and informative guide to Estonia, the northernmost of the “little” Baltic States, which sits above Latvia and borders on Russia - for real visitors and armchair travellers alike. It has all the usual features, with excellent maps - and a full-colour relief map of the country at the front (with the major roads) showing you the shape and texture of the country. There are two excellent colour photo sections in the book, the rest of which is monochrome.

This is a readable guidebook, and the author has been visiting or living in the country since 1992, and is a former tour company director, specialising in the Baltic States. This is not a set of listings and things to see and do, but a structured guide to the country, with things to see and do integrated into the chapters.

The Contents are -
P001: General Information
P003: Background Information
P051: Practical Information
P071: The Guide
P073: Tallinn
P135: Around Tallinn
P153: North and Northeast Estonia
P177: Central Estonia
P209: South and Southeast Estonia
P233: Western Estonia and the Islands
P291: Language
P294: Further Information
P301: Index


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20