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The Low Carb Myth: Free Yourself from Carb Myths, and Discover the Secret Keys That Really Determine Your Health and Fat Loss Destiny
The Low Carb Myth: Free Yourself from Carb Myths, and Discover the Secret Keys That Really Determine Your Health and Fat Loss Destiny

0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 22 Feb. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Essential reading for anyone interested in nutrition strategies to change body composition and health.


Zen Pencils: Cartoon Quotes from Inspirational Folks
Zen Pencils: Cartoon Quotes from Inspirational Folks
by Gavin Aung Than
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

5.0 out of 5 stars Priceless, 24 Nov. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
If you are at all interested in inspirational and motivational quotes, then buy this. It's a no-brainer. It's a bargain. It is outstanding.


Gone Girl
Gone Girl
by Gillian Flynn
Edition: Paperback
Price: £3.85

3.0 out of 5 stars Pretty good, 15 Dec. 2013
This review is from: Gone Girl (Paperback)
I enjoyed this. An easy read and the structure up to about the half way point was intriguing. Once the twist was revealed it did slide a little, but it was engaging enough to make me want to read on. I may be the only person here who actually liked the ending!


John Dies at the End
John Dies at the End
by David Wong
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much of the same, 15 Dec. 2013
This review is from: John Dies at the End (Paperback)
It started well, but I had to abandon it 3/4 of the way through. A collection of random but samey events spanning 500-odd pages. What started as an entertaining, refreshing novel quickly turned into a rather boring mishmash. There are a lot of positives here, but as others have said, you can read about 1/2 of the book and leave it and not have missed out.


Bone Games: Extreme Sports, Shamanism, Zen and the Search for Transcendence
Bone Games: Extreme Sports, Shamanism, Zen and the Search for Transcendence
by R. Schultheis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.96

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, 4 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A strange but fascinating book. It doesn't provide many answers to the questions raised by humans' abilities to achieve greatness under stress; but that, I'm sure, is the point.


The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever: "Lord Foul's Bane", "Illearth War" and "Power That Preserves"
The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant, the Unbeliever: "Lord Foul's Bane", "Illearth War" and "Power That Preserves"
by Stephen Donaldson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.58

5 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars So derivative..., 26 May 2012
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Contains SPOILERS

Maybe I've been spoiled after reading the first 4 books of A Song of Fire and Ice, but I couldn't stand this book. The similarities with Lord of the Rings made this book unreadable for me. I only managed 200 pages; here are some of the 'coincidences' I found:

A reluctant 'hero' who bears a ring of power (Frodo...)
One of the first characters Covenant meets in the Land is Drool, a creature who shouts "Mine!" in triumph once he realises he's succeeded in getting what he wants (Gollum...)
The first location Covenant comes to is Mithil Stonedown (Mithril...)
He then travels to a city in the trees, but is captured and led by the mistrusting Woodhelvennin to their home (the elves of Lothlorien and their mistrust of Gimli...). He is then given a gift by the 'elves'...
He is helped by a very old giant with a booming voice and plenty of patience (Treebeard...)
Before he comes to the great city of Revelstone (Gondor...) he is met by men on horses called the Eomen (Eomer...)

There are probably more, but these jumped out so clearly it was impossible to ignore them!

But similarities aside, I couldn't enjoy this book at all for the reason that the Washington Post found it compelling - we experience it through the eyes of Covenant, an unbeliever. Covenant is a miserable and whiny person, therefore everything he describes is tainted with negativity. He left me feeling a little bit depressed and not at all sorry for him and his condition. And every other word he says seems to be "Hellfire!" or "Bloody hell!". He and the novel are annoying.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 30, 2013 10:11 AM BST


Horus Rising (The Horus Heresy)
Horus Rising (The Horus Heresy)
by Dan Abnett
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Camping it up with the Space Marines, 11 Feb. 2011
This novel will probably have been the last one I read from the Black Library's collection. I really wanted to like it, but lack of plot; far, far, far too many characters (all of them cardboard cut-outs); and a weird depiction of the personalities of Space Marines prevented me from doing so. I had to chuckle when I read the words of a previous reviewer about the underlying homo-eroticism! I thought the same thing as I started reading "Horus Rising", and once you've tuned into it it's difficult to ignore it. The sentimental and melodramatic exchanges between the future's oh-so manly warriors, coupled with the shortage of female characters (and those who do make an appearance are weak) make it difficult to take this novel seriously! It's frustrating, as Abnett clearly has a grasp of language and structure on occasion ("Eisenhorn" is good, and there are parts in "Horus Rising" that are promising), but dialogue really lets him down. As a teenager I was fascinated by the Warhammer 40K universe, but 15 years later I've either grown out of the whole thing or I've discovered that the territory can only be claimed by die-hard fans. For intelligent science fiction take a look at Ian M. Banks' Culture novels, beginning with "Consider Phlebas".....I'm just gutted I bought "False Gods" 50 pages into "Horus Rising".
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 6, 2011 8:52 PM BST


The Reality Dysfunction: 1/3 (Night's Dawn Trilogy)
The Reality Dysfunction: 1/3 (Night's Dawn Trilogy)
by Peter F. Hamilton
Edition: Paperback

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Hmmm, 22 Jan. 2009
Just finished this. And was glad to finally do so. As has been said, the concept is strong, and the plot is constructed well (for which I've given 3 stars). However, the characterisation is unbelievably weak - instead of concentrating on and developing strong core characters Hamilton conjures up hundreds of cardboard cutouts who offer very little. By the time I was half way through the book whenever a new character was introduced I invariably bypassed the next page and a half or so where their backgrounds were described, as they would soon be dead or forgotten. I also quickly learnt to bypass the endless, endless sexual references (which together must amount to about 50 pages); the erotic equivalent to a young teenager's dreams. Shockingly bad. I also found the writing misogynistic (I doubt many female readers would be impressed with Hamilton's prose and characterisation). The dialogue is dire; full of gung-ho cliches, and Hamilton seems unsure of the nationalities/accents of his characters: they'll 'sound' invariably English one minute, then spout terrible Americanisms. And I challenge anyone not to laugh out loud when they reach the part where the plot is based on the 'English' plamet of Norfolk. Very funny.

However. I bought the sequels two days ago, because I really do want to know how the story develops. Whether I'll actually read them is another matter. I might skip through them like I did with much of this book.

So bottom line: Good ideas, strong plot(lines), effectively descriptive, but very weak characterisation, awful dialogue. Look past the latter negatives and you'll probably enjoy this.


Amtrak Wars Vol.1: CLOUD WARRIOR: Cloud Warrior Bk.1
Amtrak Wars Vol.1: CLOUD WARRIOR: Cloud Warrior Bk.1
by Patrick Tilley
Edition: Paperback

2.0 out of 5 stars Book 1: Cloud Warrior, 26 Feb. 2007
This book had been sitting on my shelf since my early teenage years, and I picked it up yesterday as I'd been keen to read it for years. How disappointed I was. I managed to read almost to the end, with 60 pages to go, but I just couldn't be bothered. Up until that point there had been just enough of an intriguing plot to keep the pages turning (albeit reluctantly), despite some woeful writing.

I really don't 'get' Patrick Tilley's style: one minute he's providing some fascinating descriptions and theories (most of which haven't really dated since the time of writing in the 80s), and the next he's bombarding us with some pretty dire dialogue. At first I thought this was a cleverly intended method, juxtaposing the macho 'Top Gun' language of the Federation with the basic, neanderthal language of the Mutes. After a few chapters, however, it was clear that it was simply the author's weak grasp on realistic dialogue. He also had a bad habit of putting a theory forward, or posing a question, only to answer it before the reader had a chance to consider it. Also, he had a very annoying habit of addressing the reader, asking us 'not to be too hard on Steve', or 'consider things from his point of view' etc.

Maybe younger readers, or those who aren't too picky about quality of writing will enjoy this, but I'm a bit older at 27 and very critical. The fact that the series goes downhill after the first book prompted me to leave the series there and, after reading the synopses of all six books on Wikipedia, I'm glad I did.


The Time Traveler's Wife
The Time Traveler's Wife
by Audrey Niffenegger
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very moving, 21 Nov. 2006
A very moving novel indeed. I have to be honest I struggled with this book. I'm so busy I only manage to steal moments to read every few days. However, a friend who'd read this novel persuaded me (on several occasions) to keep at it - that it was worth it. And she was completely right. My advice is to read this novel with as few time gaps as possible between readings. That way you'll get the very best out of it. Highly recommended.


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