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Nikica Gilic

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Linger Awhile: Live at Newport and More
Linger Awhile: Live at Newport and More
Price: £20.75

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sassy compilation, 20 Aug. 2011
Well, if this is NOT essential Vaughan CD, it is still interesting both for Sassy's fans and general jazz (and jazzy) audiences... The first portion of CD is made of live 1957Newport recording (around 25 minutes) where she sounds younger than on some earlier recordings and, although very pleasurable, this set is uneven, so it is no wonder it was not released before turn of the century... Sarah's band here is Jimmy Jones (p), Richard Davis (b), Roy Haynes(dm) - again, not working together as well as one would expect of these professionals...
The rest of the CD is a bunch of alternate tracks from various albums and, ACTUALLY, some of these are better than the "original" Newport portion - for instance two tracks alternate from the early '80s album Crazy and Mixed up (Sassy sings with Joe Pass-g, Roland Hanna-p, Andy SImpkins-b, Harold Jones-dm) ...
And, of course, it's always pleasure to hear Sassy working with Basie orchestra (and there are two alternate tracks with Basie's band from early '80s, without Basie, with Sassys trio sittin' in with Freddie Green and the horns)...
So, although not one of the first Vaughan albums to buy, this is more than curiosity and there are sone very fine moments... In the context of Sassy's career I give it 4 stars, although I'd rather give it 4 and a half...
For, Sassy was great not only only when she was perfect...


Traditionalism Revisited
Traditionalism Revisited
Offered by Disco100
Price: £12.76

5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Merging of styles, 27 July 2011
This is as beautiful as I kinda hoped it might be...

If you're into West Coast jazz (50s, cool style) you 'll probably like it, but the same goes if you are a traditionalist (like I am)
or if you like merging of different eras and styles (like me, again)...
Bob Brookmeyer (on trombone and piano), Jimmy Giuffree (on reeds) and Jim Hall (on guitar)work tightly, elegantly and intelligently together showing how well jazz can work when it transcends boundaries...
Magnificent!


The Gifted Ones
The Gifted Ones

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars By Jove! This is swinging!, 25 July 2011
This review is from: The Gifted Ones (Audio CD)
Whether it's a blues or be-bop standard, these cats play some mean and swinging mainstream jazz. Dizzy Gillespie, in a sense, sounds younger than he did in his hay-day,
in another sense he sounds older than ever, belonging to the previous generation of players, very much concerned with bending them notes in a blue growl... It is, of course, the concept of teaming (one of the greatest living) swing pianist (The Count), who happens to be heavily blues - oriented, with the great be-bop trumpeter,
who inherited quite a lot from previous generations of players (including sense of musical humor)...

This rock-solid quartet gives Dizzy in one of the better performances I've heard him do in the 70s, whereas Basie was still going quite strong at that time (as a rule, pianists age better than brass players)... With the versatile Ray Brown and Mickey Roker anchoring the quartet, no wonder this all turned out so great...
The deapth of the understanding these guys have for each other is not surprising; Ray Brown, for instance, played extensively with THE mainstream pianist - Oscar Peterson, placed firmly between swing and modern jazz, but before that he was one of the explorers who were building be-bop around Bird and Dizzy...
For me, this is what jazz should sound like.


Gifted Ones
Gifted Ones

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars By Jove! This is swinging!, 25 July 2011
This review is from: Gifted Ones (Audio CD)
Whether it's a blues or be-bop standard, these cats play some mean and swinging mainstream jazz. Dizzy Gillespie, in a sense, sounds younger than he did in his hay-day,
in another sense he sounds older than ever, belonging to the previous generation of players, very much concerned with bending them notes in a blue growl... It is, of course, the concept of teaming (one of the greatest living) swing pianist (The Count), who happens to be heavily blues - oriented, with the great be-bop trumpeter,
who inherited quite a lot from previous generations of players (including sense of musical humor)...

This rock-solid quartet gives Dizzy in one of the better performances I've heard him do in the 70s, whereas Basie was still going quite strong at that time (as a rule, pianists age better than brass players)... With the versatile Ray Brown and Mickey Roker anchoring the quartet, no wonder this all turned out so great...
The deapth of the understanding these guys have for each other is not surprising; Ray Brown, for instance, played extensively with THE mainstream pianist - Oscar Peterson, placed firmly between swing and modern jazz, but before that he was one of the explorers who were building be-bop around Bird and Dizzy...
For me, this is what jazz should sound like.


The Gifted Ones
The Gifted Ones
Price: £6.34

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars By Jove! This is swinging!, 25 July 2011
This review is from: The Gifted Ones (Audio CD)
Whether it's a blues or be-bop standard, these cats play some mean and swinging mainstream jazz. Dizzy Gillespie, in a sense, sounds younger than he did in his hay-day,
in another sense he sounds older than ever, belonging to the previous generation of players, very much concerned with bending them notes in a blue growl... It is, of course, the concept of teaming (one of the greatest living) swing pianist (The Count), who happens to be heavily blues - oriented, with the great be-bop trumpeter,
who inherited quite a lot from previous generations of players (including sense of musical humor)...

This rock-solid quartet gives Dizzy in one of the better performances I've heard him do in the 70s, whereas Basie was still going quite strong at that time (as a rule, pianists age better than brass players)... With the versatile Ray Brown and Mickey Roker anchoring the quartet, no wonder this all turned out so great...
The deapth of the understanding these guys have for each other is not surprising; Ray Brown, for instance, played extensively with THE mainstream pianist - Oscar Peterson, placed firmly between swing and modern jazz, but before that he was one of the explorers who were building be-bop around Bird and Dizzy...
For me, this is what jazz should sound like.


Urbane Jazz
Urbane Jazz
Price: £9.72

5.0 out of 5 stars SO beautiful, 11 July 2011
This review is from: Urbane Jazz (Audio CD)
Roy Eldridge and Benny Carter have collaborated for the first time long ago before these 1950s recordings.... And it actually made me think how both have actually changed (NOT improved, just changerd) between 30s and the 50s (or in Benny's case since 30s and 70s or 90s)... No wonder that liner notes compare Carter to Stan Getz...
These sophisticated players are sophisticated in quite different manner and, in addition to that, both are swinging so strongly...
SUch a rich mainstream jazz offering this CD is (with bonus tracks of Roy playing duo with the hot drums of Alvin Stoller).

This oone might, just might hook you up on jazz if you're not already a fan.... The fans, on other hand, know, what Roy adn Benny can do (and at this occasion they rise to the expectations IMHO)..


Carmen Mcrae - Live in Montreal [2005] (NTSC) [DVD]
Carmen Mcrae - Live in Montreal [2005] (NTSC) [DVD]
Dvd ~ Carmen Mcrae
Offered by mecodu-uk
Price: £14.50

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Carmen the Magnificent, 16 Jun. 2011
Supported by the ellegant back-up group (lead by Eric Gunnison on piano), with sax master Clifford Jordan as a very welcome guest, this great diva really shines on this live concert DVD, recorded near the end of fher career, when she recorded a beautiful Thelonious Monk album ( Carmen Sings Monk: Remastered )...
She sings a great many of Monk's tunes here (with lyrics written mostly by Jon Hendricks), but she made a mixed programe (as she eloquently explains to the audience) with other beautiful jazz standards...
Witty comunicator, master of rhythm and those lovely twisted notes that make a great part of the greatness of jazz, Carmen is magnificent and this DVD might make you a fan (if youre not already)...
This DvD is equall to all the other best jazz vocal DVDs I've seen so far and fares well compared to the best vocal CDs by Carmen or any other giant.


El Rojo
El Rojo
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: £34.95

5.0 out of 5 stars EL ROJO, 12 Jun. 2011
This review is from: El Rojo (Audio CD)
Yes, this is a very interesting swing compilation;
Red Norvo plays fluid and swinging lines on the vibraphone and xylophone (the latter has more wooden sound).
If your records/CD collection is swarming with Benny Goodman and/or Lionel Hampton recordings, I must warn you that part of this music
(labeled as "The Complete Keynote/Capitol Small Group Recordings & more) is similar to their stuff, but some of the recordings are
more distinctive, not only thanks to Red, but also to the company he keeps; check out, for instance, tracks 8 and 9:
"Hollyridge Drive" (B. Carter) and "Under a Blanket of Blue"(Livingston-Symes-Neiburg), uplifted by the presence of the great Benny Carter.

Johnny Thompson fares out pretty well here as well, with more than third of recordings being his arrangements,
with some nice solos throughout, not only by Red, but also by Teddy Wilson, Vic Dickenson, Joe Thomas, Barney kessel,
Dodo Marmarosa, Arnold Ross and others, including a nice short duet by Jimmy Giuffre (as) and Dexter Gordon (ts) on
"I'll Follow You". You can also recognise distinctive contributions by two great bass players -
you can often hear them even when they don't solo: Slam Stewart (1-7) and Red Callender (10-22)

The tracks from 12-16 find Norvo's outfit in the service of likeable but hardly unforgettable vocal of Kay Starr (she actually does sound blueish on "Steady Daddy" and even scatts a little), otherwise Norvo is the star, often leaving plenty of space for his "sidemen".
Yes, this is mostly for the swing fans, in spite of the likeable "Bop" (Norvo-Rogers) - track number 11 and the quite unusal sound of tracks 17-22 (check out the personell list)
If you're into ethno-jazz experiments, there's "Russian Lullaby" (I. Berlin) and Latin flavored "El Rojo" (R. Norvo)

Here comes complete personell of this CD compilation:

Red Norvo with
1-4 Aaron Sachs (cl) Teddy Wilson (p), Remo Palmieri (g), Slam Stewart (b), Eddie Dell (dm)
5-7 Joe Thomas (tp), Vic Dickenson (tb), Hank D'Amico (cl), T. Wilson (p), S. Stewart (b),
Specs Powell (dm), arr. Johnny Thompson
8-9 Bobbby Sherwood (co), Benny Carter (as), Dave Cavanaugh, Eddie Miller (ts), Arnold Ross (p),
Dave Barbour (g), Billy Hadnott (b), Jesse Price (dm)
10-11 Ray Linn (tp), Jimmy Giuffre (as or ts), Dexter Gordon (ts), Dodo Marmarosa (p), Barney Kessel (g),
Red Callender (b), Jackie Mills (dm)
12-16 Kay Star (vocal), Dick Anderson (cl), D. Cavanaugh (ts), A. Ross (p), Jack Marshall (g), R. Callender (b),
Jack Turner (dm)
17-18 Don Bonnie (cl), Lloyd Rathburn (oboe), Al Gershoff (fl), Jimmy Rowles (p), R. Callender (b),
Irv(ing) Cotter (dm), arr. J. Thompson
19-22 Manny Klein (tp), John Cave, Al Berlich (frh), Don Bonnie (cl), Jules Kinsler, Bob Lawson (b-cl),
L. Rathburn (oboe), Vic Poscella (fl), Art Fleming (bassoon), A. Ross (p), B. Kessel (g),
R. Callender (b), I. Cottler (dm), arr. J. Thompson

Tracks are from
1-7 : 1944.
8-22 : 1947.


Brussels Fair 1958
Brussels Fair 1958
Price: £9.77

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HOT JAZZ in Brussels (Bruxelles), 5 Jun. 2011
This review is from: Brussels Fair 1958 (Audio CD)
This CD might be the proper way to start studying Sidney Bechet if you're a younger jazz fan interested in past masters... It is reasonably well recorded (technically speaking) and there are hints of more modern styles with other players...
The band is quite stellar (particularly in the horns; the rhythm could have been a bit tighter IMHO): S. Bechet -ss, Buck Clayton -tp, Vic Dickenson - tb, George Wein -p, Arvell Shaw- b, Kansas Fields -dm.... On track 9 (Blues Ad-lib) a host of younger stars join old Sidney - Sarah Vaughan + a big band of really young players, including Dusko Goykovich from Serbia (Yugoslavia) on trumpet, great German trombonist Albert Mangelsdorff, Hungarian (I guess) guitarist Gabor Szabo and others...

I'm writing from a 2010 edition of this CD, with several bonus tracks (10-17) of Bechet's glorious quartet - Bechet (ss), Martial Solal (p), Lloyd Thompson (b), al Levitt (dm)... Actually, it's quite surprising how well Sidney and Martial (a future giant of modern piano AND the composer for J-L. Godard's Breathless) work together - a true meeting of the times.

Talk about an all-stars CD!
Sidney is still going strong, near the end of his rich life (he WAS one of the very few acknowledged soloists of jazz) although, I must admit my preference of trumpet and trombone sound over the sound of soprano sax is not shaken with this great album... Vic Dickenson and Buck Clayton are among the greatest performes of swing, classic and mainstream jazz - if anyone has any doubts, you can point him/her to this CD (Clayton's feature on "All of me" is oh-so-growlingly sweeet!).

Do I recommend this CD? Oh, my, do I!!!!!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 27, 2011 12:12 PM BST


Breakfast Dance And Barbecue
Breakfast Dance And Barbecue
Offered by Disco100
Price: £11.16

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars SWINGING Basie, 30 May 2011
Of course, this beautiful album boasts the solos of Al Grey, Joe Newman, Thad Jones, Frank Wess (flute on "Cute", tenor on "Roll 'em Pete"...), Frank Foster and other major figures in the second testament Count Basie orchestra (plus Joe Williams, plus a guest spot for Harry Sweets Edison in the end...)... There's even a very nice Snooky Young solo on Foster-penned "Who me?"...
BUT it is the strong ensemble work that this band stands out for, with Basie's irresistibly plinking and splanking piano and rock-solid rhythm of Basie, Freddie Green (g), Eddie Jones (b) and Sonny Payne (dm)...
The songs are great, with some creative reworking and blending (for instance the beginning of Hefti's "Cute"), some are "greatest hits", some are less well known and there's an occasional pleasant surprise or two - for instance Ellington's tune "In A Mellow Tone" and Joe Williams singing "No Moon at All"...
Basiecly, this is an excellent swing album, yet another instance of 2nd testament Basie performing admirably, with chatter of bar-audience augmenting the relaxed atmosphere this tight band so easily creates!


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