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Nikica Gilic

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Jazz On A Summers Day [DVD]
Jazz On A Summers Day [DVD]
Dvd ~ Bert Stern
Offered by DaaVeeDee-uk
Price: £16.98

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A great film about JAZZZZZZZZZZZ and some blues and gospel and rock, 28 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Jazz On A Summers Day [DVD] (DVD)
I own a different edition of the film ( Jazz On A Summer's Day [DVD] [1958] [NTSC] ), so I just wanted to say this is a great jazz documentary, with Dinah Washington swinging madly with Terry Gibbs (even joining him for a ride with hot mallets), with the incredible Anita O'Day singing exuisitly (and, oh, so hip), with Louis Armstrong and Jack Teagarden working beautifully together, with some fine cool jazz (Jimmy Giuffree, Bob Brookmeyer, Jim Hall), with Mahalia Jackson charming and charismatic as ever (and shy as a young girl when receiving a well deserved applaus...)...
There's also the blues women Big Maybelle, Thelonious Monk (albeit interrupted by the "documentary" material of yacht races) and lots of other attractions, for instance Chuck Berry rocking and rolling with a jazzers backing him up...
My copy of the film is magnificent (although the gratiutous CD that came with it was faulty, skipping on the second half). I hope this edition is as great.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 17, 2013 9:53 PM GMT


Original Album Classics
Original Album Classics
Price: £15.94

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Plenty of Armstrong, 27 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Original Album Classics (Audio CD)
Plenty of Satchmo for this price... Actually, I probably wouldn't be mistaken if I said this is an excellent overview of "mature" Satchmo, in dixieland oriented format, but with Louis as an undisputable star...
For a long time underappreciated, these albums and performances finally got some traction in the past several decades, with the original idea of Armstrong's "circus" slowly making place for the idea of fierce, hot, swinging jazz with traditionalist flavor. In addition to Satchmo himself (still a powerhouse of playing and singing in the 1950s), the bands include some quite competent back-up players, quite able to do both the ensemble (neworleans-ish performance) and hot solos when at the spotlight. These particularly goes to the clarinet master Edmond Hall (who is HOT), but also Billy Kyle on piano and Trummy Young on the trombone, both sadly unappreciated... Barney Bigard (one of the great Ellingtonians) is also heard on these albums - although his style is less suitable to the Armstrong-created environment than Hall's, he is still a great musician....
And there's also Velma Middleton, not a great vocalist per se, but energetic and, well, fun... (the same could be said to the Trummy Young's vocals - he ain't no Jack Teagarden).
But, overall, the music is great, it's only a pity
Columbia went back for "Plays W. C. Handy" and used the inferior edition with alternate takes instead of later, painstaikingly restored edition true to original LP album...

EDIT:
Akhm... I just realised that "Satch plays Fats" is also faulty... Also not the best versions are used... Well... I can still give it 4 stars alltogether...
END OF EDIT...

But even with this minor flaw, this 4 albums (and 5 cds) package (The great Chicago concert has two CDs) is one of the best approaches to the art of Armstrong on the market...
I already owned all others albums EXCEPT The great Chicago concert and I still bought it, because it's cheaper than the concert album bought on its own... Folks, there's still recession where I live, I'm ready to pay for my music, but when I pay less, it's even sweeter.
And now I have double CDs of some of my favorite jazz albums (honestly, Ambassador Satch is a masterpiece as well)... Pity bout Plays W C Handy desicion though...

You get Louis live and Louis in studio, playing standards, occasional novelty tune ("Faithfull hussar" ? Not my cup of tea), concept albums and a lot of positive energy.
Recommended.
BTW, shipping costs aside, you get better price on american version of amazon at the moment I'm writing this...


Duke Ellington And Sarah Vaughan - Live At The Berlin Philharmonic Hall 1989 [DVD]
Duke Ellington And Sarah Vaughan - Live At The Berlin Philharmonic Hall 1989 [DVD]
Offered by nationwide
Price: £6.49

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not quite consistent but with some MARVELOUS musical moments, 19 Oct. 2010
These quite rare tracks show Sarah Vaughan in her prime (and still quite attractive, if I might add a small opinion),
scatting and mellow-singing with her trio, as well as a not so bad (but neither perfect nor perfectly presented) version of Duke Ellington's orchestra,
featuring Russell Procope, Harry Carney, Paul Gonsalves and other giants, plus some bit younger but still mean cats (Harold Ashbey, Norris Turney)...
Maybe Cootie Williams is not up to the task on "Take the A Train" (Is it really him? He used to sound so powerful once upon the time...), but Gonsalves-Ashby-Turney tenor sax battle is a riot(on "Triplicate") and Duke is always a pure joy to watch and listen, conducting and leading his orchestra and the smaller outfits (which is also documented in the Ellington segment of the DVD).

The liner notes are non-existant in my version of this DVD
and the personell info on Ellington is quite insuficient, but this is a nice addition to your jazz video collection...
Sassy sings "Scat' Blues", perrenial favorite "Misty" (before her voice grew too deep for the bennefit of that lovely Garner-penned ballad) and other standards and gems ("Clear Day",
"I Cried for You", "My Funny Valentine" and "All of me")... The pianist Johnny Veith has a very nice and gentle, somewhat surprising vocal chorus on "Misty" (he is the second Vaughan's pianist
I've heard doing that; it must have been a method to uplift the familiar song they may have grew a bit tired of doing) whereas on the Ellington set there's a just OK Louis-Armstrong imitation by a Money Johnson, a vocalist (with trumpet in hand) I'm not familiar with.
The lower point of otherwise beautiful Vaughan segment is "My Funny Valentine", where Sassy shows off her vocal capabilities (not surprisingly, the audience liked it); "Misty" and all tbe livelier tracks give much better performance by one of the true giants of jazz singing ("All of Me" is, perhaps, particularly uplifting)...

Apparently, everything was recorded in Berlin in 1969 (although I'm not sure that Ellington tracks are all recorded on the same day).
The Vaughan's trio are Johnny Veith (p), Gus Mancuso (b) and Eddy Pucci (dm).


Jazz Masters of New Orleans
Jazz Masters of New Orleans
by Martin T. Williams
Edition: Hardcover

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading IMHO, 17 Oct. 2010
O boy, what a beautiful reading... I know the book is quite old now, but such a loving and (IMHO) subtle and intelligent
writing on Henry Red Allen, Bunk Johnson, Sidney Bechet or Zutty Singleton is very much appreciated by this jazz fan... I know enough about the New Orleans jazz tradition to appreciate this book, but I've learned a lot here:
- Did you know why the drummers of New Orleans jazz have always been underrecorded? Did you know that Orson Welles was a big New Orleans jazz fan who even had a hand in the birth of dixieland revival? Did you know how misunderstud Bunk Johnson was even among those who idolised him (maybe even ESPECIALLY among them)? Did you know what was Sidney Bechet's approach to collective and individual jazz/music improvisation and arrangement?

Students of more general (American, African-American, musical) history might also find this book very much intriguing.

Untill you hear otherwise from someone more informed, this is a classic in my book. Jazz book.


Jawbreakers
Jawbreakers
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: £15.95

5.0 out of 5 stars How sweet and swinging this is, 14 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Jawbreakers (Audio CD)
AMAZING music... The sensitive, often muted and at times discreet (but, if necessary, quite hot), Harry Sweets Edison was one of the BEST swing (and, later, mainstream) trumpet players. In this album, their first collaboration, he clicked BEAUTIFULLY with the verbose (slightly Coleman-Hawkinsish) tenor sax giant Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis, a player of great capacity for swinging hard, balladeering gently and blow roughly (as demonstrated with C. Basie, with Shirley Scott&Jerome Richardson, with Johnny Griffin...).
They never recorded together before this occasion, but they recorded several albums after this gem, which will clime high on my wish list (I bought this CD-album on the French Amazon site, a bit cheaper than here on British, but PAY WHATEVER THEY ASK YOU TO!!!!!! You will not regret it.)

The rhythm section was Edison's usual group of the time (he also played with the tenor man Jimmy Forrest in the band) and, as the liner notes inform us,
it was Lackjaw's idea to use the group Edison is well connected to...
It must have helped the intensity of swing here---
It is also interested to note that a part of the repertoire of this album is inspired by Miles Davis,
another minimalist of the jazz trumpet,
which is no great surprise, particularly since Lockjaw is a true mainstream horn-blower (associated with Basie years after Edison left that great band)...
There's blues, there's groove, there's first class jazz, comparable to BEST and most liked small group albums ever
( think "Kind of Blue", "Tatum Group Masterpieces", "Sweets at Haig", "Coleman Hawkins encounters Ben Webster", Count Basie&Roy ELdridge's "Loose Walk"...)


Live 1965
Live 1965
Offered by trec002
Price: £39.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars RED ALLEN - a true trumpet giant, 9 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Live 1965 (Audio CD)
Although this might not be THE FIRST Red Allen CD you should buy, you should buy it nevertheless - his playing is spirited and extremely rich, expressive in sound and often quite surprising in phrasing.
Henry Red Allen was probably one of the best trumpet players in the entire jazz history, comparable only to the greatest (Armstrong, Beiderbecke, Eldridge, Gillespie, Davis, Brown...);
he is definitively equally individual, idiosyncratic and unique as they are so even the most accomplished of players, such as Sammy Price on piano here, might sound a tad inferior in his company.
Intelligent balladeer, hard swinger and hot shouter, Allen gives a great performance on this CD (as he did so many times with Fletcher Henderson, Coleman Hawkins, Pee Wee Russell and other jazz giants).
The song selection might be slightly questionable, but, with the exception of newer pop fodder "Never on Sunday", every old song is given a fresh or fairly fresh, but always emotional, sometimes even rambunctious approach.

Since he plays only with his quartet here (and he is the only horn), you might want to build up to this CD by consuming his recordings with bigger bands (these were my gateway to his genius):
Ride, Red, Ride in Hi
Ride Red Ride: Original Mono Recordings 1930-1946
Vintage Collection - Jazz Masters 1958-1961 [DVD]

However, even if you are a Red Allen beginner, don't hesitate in buying this quartet CD, recorded in 1965 - maybe it will soon disappear from the market for who knows how long.


Sweet Rain
Sweet Rain
Offered by EliteDigital UK
Price: £13.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This GREAT Getz CD is magnificent in several ways..., 3 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Sweet Rain (Audio CD)
... For instance, it's like this 1967 recording is contemporary in overall sound and execution; Getz's approach to sound and improvisation seems to be quite influential nowdays, incorporated into the work of younger musicians... Also, the music is at moments just plain LOVELY in the old fashion sense, when people cared more deeply (and more often) about the BEAUTY of the sound...
This album is for all sorts of jazz (and even fusion) fans.
Others have said and written alot about Getz; he is probably one of the best sax players I've ever heard and there's a calmness in his music that's like the eye of the storm, suggesting the tumult around it...
The quartet works beautifully together...The interplay of the band is great (Chick Corea on piano, Ron Carter on bass, Grady Tate on drums), with the "rhythm section" giving a more modern sound to the album...
and there are worthwile solos by Corea and Carter worthy of Getz's leadership.
And yes, the original liner notes reprinted here are quite silly and pointless.
BTW
This CD is also somewhat confusing for me in one respect - I went to a Chick Corea in my town some two years ago; this album is recorded over 40 years before that concert took place...
Is that guy for real? How old is he? He looked quite youngish, playful and quite energetic on the concert (he played with the banjoist Bela Fleck)...


Sweet Rain
Sweet Rain
Price: £6.57

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This GREAT Getz CD is magnificent in several ways..., 3 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Sweet Rain (Audio CD)
... For instance, it's like this 1967 recording is contemporary in overall sound and execution; Getz's approach to sound and improvisation seems to be quite influential nowdays, incorporated into the work of younger musicians... Also, the music is at moments just plain LOVELY in the old fashion sense, when people cared more deeply (and more often) about the BEAUTY of the sound...
This album is for all sorts of jazz (and even fusion) fans.
Others have said and written alot about Getz; he is probably one of the best sax players I've ever heard and there's a calmness in his music that's like the eye of the storm, suggesting the tumult around it...
The quartet works beautifully together...The interplay of the band is great (Chick Corea on piano, Ron Carter on bass, Grady Tate on drums), with the "rhythm section" giving a more modern sound to the album...
and there are worthwile solos by Corea and Carter worthy of Getz's leadership.
And yes, the original liner notes reprinted here are quite silly and pointless.
BTW
This CD is also somewhat confusing for me in one respect - I went to a Chick Corea in my town some two years ago; this album is recorded over 40 years before that concert took place...
Is that guy for real? How old is he? He looked quite youngish, playful and quite energetic on the concert (he played with the banjoist Bela Fleck)...


Les Double Six Meets Quincy Jones/Les Double Six
Les Double Six Meets Quincy Jones/Les Double Six
Price: £8.05

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Swing with the mad French swingers (and boppers), 28 Sept. 2010
Now if you like Lambert Hendricks & Ross, I'm pretty sure you'll like this group;

working in more or less same idiom (with the wonderful Mimi Perrin writing the lyrics to instrumental jazz)... On the downside - none of the voices is as expressive as Jon Hendricks' and you might have a linguistic barrier on your hands since they sing in French.
But, I believe this great music transcendns the linguistic barriers; if you don't speak the language, you'll only appreciate the musicianship more... Also, there are texts of all songs in the booklet, so you can learn/practice your French...
BTW, you get 2 les double six albums on this CD (not that they say so in the booklet; I read it from another review) so you're in treat...
Also interesting - The Swingle Singers developed from the seed of this group, but this outfit is more swinging (probably because the chief Mimi Perrin was leading them that way)...
There's overdubbing, there's wit, there's plenty of swing and bop (and some of the best rhythm sections available at the time in Paris)...


The Blues: That's Me!
The Blues: That's Me!
Price: £10.97

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful blues and other facets of mainstream jazz, 26 Sept. 2010
This review is from: The Blues: That's Me! (Audio CD)
One of the good ones (and maybe somewhat underestimated ones)...
It is an Illinois Jacquet album, it's called "The Blues; That's Me!";
if you think you've pegged it before actually listening, let me warn you that Jacquet traded his tenor sax for the basoon to give as an sensitive interpretation of Monk's "Round Midnight" on this album (and the bass player Buster Williams uses his bow alot to achieve compatible effects... Great deal of this album is a very bluesy mainstream jazz affair, with the occasional feeling of jam-session (which can be both good and bad, depends how you look at it...).

Illinois is one of those muscular tenor men from the Texas school (as Dan Morgenstern points out in the reprinted original liner notes) but this album is one of the proofs how complete a musician he was /I'm glad his career was so long; there's more for me to explore.../
Another of the less bluesy gems from this CD is "The Galloping Latin", set by a beatiful Wynton Kelly intro on piano, while the rhythm section is superb throughout.
Personell:
I. Jacquet (ts, basoon), Tiny Grimes (g), Wynton Kelly (p), Buster Williams (b), Oliver Jackson (dm)...

Recorded in 1969.

p.s. if you're a Stewie Wonder fan you might be interested in Jacquet's take on "For once in my life" on this record; the song sounds as something written long time ago, forgoten and thankfully rediscovered by this jazz legend...


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