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Dr S. S. Nagi "Nyrobe" (united kingdom)
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The Tracker: The Story of Tom Brown, Jr.
The Tracker: The Story of Tom Brown, Jr.
by Tom Brown
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THE TRACKER, 25 Dec 2014
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This book was first published in 1978, has 190 pages, 21 chapters and foot print drawings of humans and animals through out this book. The book is dedicated to author WILLIAM JON WATKINS' wife and children.
This book is on TOM BROWN Jr, who is said to be one of the best trackers in USA. His pursuit of the mysteries of the track has taken him through the wilds, living in the wild with nothing but a knife, stalking and being stalked by grizzly, helping police track and destroy a pack of killer dogs, and finding a lost retarded adult, a thousand searchers had given up for dead.
Brown Jr started tracking at the age of 8, when "STALKING WOLF", an Apache tracker, taught him the secrets of tracking and stalking and of surviving in the wilds. With Stalking Wolf, as his guide and his grandson "RICK" as his companion, Brown Jr learnt his art by being out in the woods and following track after track of any source. Brown Jr perfected his skills and respect for all living things.
Brown Jr had spent summer alone in the wilds, living outside of time, eating and sleeping by his private clock, and loosing his taste for civilised things. He had braved the Dakota Badlands; survived in the heat and desolation of Death Valley; stayed with an Indian tribe in Grand Canyon; and learnt from old hunters, trackers and prospectors, how to live in the wilds.
There are many short stories about living in the wilds and then tracking the trails, in this book. Some parts were really hard going.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) The Hunting and Spoor of Central African Game, DD Lyell, 1929
(2) Collins Guide to Animal Tracks and Signs, Bang, 1974
(3) Man Tracking, Robbins, 1977
(4) Art Of Tracking, Liebenberg, 1990
(5) Behaviour Guide of African mammals, Estes, 1992
(6) How to Read Animal Tracks and Signs, Rezendes, 1999
(7) Mammal Tracks and signs, Elbroch, 2003
(8) Field Guide to the Tracks and Signs of Southern and Eastern African Wildlife, Stuart, 2003
(9) Animal Tracking Basics, Young, 2007
(10)Practical Tracking, Liebenberg, 2010
Having born in Kenya, I found this book interesting.


On Corbett's Trail: And Other Tales from Tree Tops
On Corbett's Trail: And Other Tales from Tree Tops
by A.J.T. Johnsingh
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ON JIM CORBETT'S TRAIL, 21 Dec 2014
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This book was first published in 2004, has 139 pages, 10 chapters, 7 B/W illustrations and 1 large map of KUMAON. The book is dedicated to security personal of India. The foreword is by John Seidensticker, senior scientist at Washington DC. Dr AJT Johnsingh is Dean, Faculty of Wildlife Sciences of India. He learnt natural history from Jim Corbett's books and loved walking in jungles. A Trained ecologist, he has gone back to Jim Corbett's forests and walked the same trails, to see how they are now.
Dr Johnsingh is from Sankar Nagar in South India, but now lives in the foothills of Himalayan Mountains. In childhood, he accidentally came across the Tamil version of 'Man-eater of Kumaon', written by Jim Corbett. This arose the wildlife interest in Dr Johnsingh. His whole family was good at fishing and hunting. While studying zoology for 4 years, Johnsingh read all of Jim Corbett's books and longed to see these areas described in his books. After his BSc and MSc, he took up a job as a lecturer in Zoology. In 1978, Johnsingh had taken his PhD. After doing a thesis in USA, he was back in India and Dehra Dun. In 1985, he became deputy director of wildlife institute of India. He had been charged by an elephant, tiger and King cobra. This book contains his 30 years of wildlife observations.
In April 1993, Johnsingh visits the forests Corbett roamed 84 years ago between KALADHUNGI and TANAKPUR. The major victims were the forests and the wildlife. The tigers were gone. The sambar was nearly extinct. The villages have grown with proper bus route through them. Locals said, leopards were still about. The mango tree and spring at THAK still exist. There were no alarm calls at night. The SARDA river had no masher fish. Most of the wildlife has been poached. In 1998, Johnsingh visited KANDA. The forest bungalow is still there, but the Kanda village has vanished. Some wildlife is here, but no tigers or elephants. He heard calls of sambar and barking deer and saw one pug mark of leopard and one of the tiger. Few tigers had been poisoned. Near MOHAN, the forest bungalow and the village had not changed. At KOSI river, there is now a Corbett Riverside resort. TALA DES is well cultivated with wide road. The large town of TANAKPUR now has pilgrims and rhesus macaques only. Land around KOT KENDRI was degraded. The THAK village was overgrown with nettles. The LADIYA and SARDA rivers had no fish. The paths Corbett described were still there, but no wildlife. Near TALA KOTE, the oak trees were replaced by scrub. With humans and their cattle, there was no room for tigers and sambar, in this old Corbett's country.
This book also deals with dholes (wild Indian dog), Nilgiri Tahr (wild goat), goral (goat antelope), vanishing tigers, Indian elephant bull tuckers, masher fish in CORBETT NATIONAL PARK, and tracking the lions of GIR forests.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) Man-eater of Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 1944 (1989)
(2) The Man-eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, Jim Corbett, 1948 (1989)
(3) My India, Jim Corbett, 1952 (1989)
(4) Jungle Lore, Jim Corbett, 1953 (2000)
(5) The temple Tiger, Jim Corbett, 1954 (1991)
(6) Tree Tops, Jim Corbett, 1955 (1992)
(7) Jim Corbett's India, Hawkins, 1978
(8) Jim Corbett of Kumaon, DC Kala, 1979 (1999) 2009 (2014)
(9) Under the Shadow of Man-eaters, Jerry Jaleel, 1997
(10)Carpet Sahib, Martin Booth, 1986
(11)My Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 2012
Having born in Kenya, I found this book interesting.


My India.
My India.
by Jim Corbett
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars MY INDIA, 18 Dec 2014
This review is from: My India. (Hardcover)
This book was first published in 1952 (1989), has 190 pages, 12 chapters, I map and also endpaper maps of KUMAON. The book is dedicated to the "poor of India". In this book Jim (EDWARD JAMES CORBETT: 25.7.1875 to 19.4.1955) narrates his India where he had spent 70 years of his life, and the people he knew between NAINI TAL (Goddess Lake) and MOKAMEH GHAT. 60 miles north is Nanda Devi (25,645ft), the highest mountain in India.
By the time Jim is informed of a man-eater, it took him 1 week to come to Naini Tal. The tiger had taken the body of a girl and then a woman, from 25ft high bush of rhododendron. Before the tiger was shot, 5 people had died. Jim could not refuse his fellow Indians for tea and cigs, as this would have been an insult. Jim was 8 years old when Kunwar Singh showed him how to climb trees and make mental maps of everything seen, in a jungle. Kunwar Singh was the best poacher in KALADHUNGI. After Mothi died of TB and Sher Singh of malignant malaria, Jim had to go after the feared old pig (son of shaitan) alone and eventually shot it. During 2nd World War, Jim had to leave Maggie (MARGARET WINIFRED CORBETT), his sister alone in Kaladhungi among his friends, the poor of India.
In the pre-red-tape-days, the superintendent was judge, magistrate, policemen, forest officer and engineer. 2 young children were lost in the jungle for 77 hours, but were found safe and without a scratch, considering the wildlife in the jungle, such is the law of the jungles. Jim's family members had been amateur physicians for many years and it was common for people to walk upto the veranda of their Kaladhugi home for treatment. Two of them were brothers, one of whom had bumped into a tiger in tall grass, and his brother then pulled him away from underneath the angry tiger.
'Sultana' was a dacoit who lived in the Kumaon forests. Since he never robbed the poor, he was classed as 'India's Robin Hood'. Jim was enjoying the train ride through beautiful north Indian countryside, but was worried about the Rupees 200 left over from his job, as the money belonged to the railwaymen, and were donated to the Railways Fund. For his loyalty, Jim was kept on the railways and transferred to Mokameh Ghat (Jim was 21 years of age), where he spent 21 years. All this time his employees were loyal to him, whom he called "the poor of my India".
Jim also cleared 3 generations of debt of 'Budhu' and received great respect from him when Budhu put his hands together and touched Jim's feet (an Indian sign of greatest respect). Jim helped 'Lalajee', a cholera victim, to start his own merchant business. Jim made 'Chamari' his headman, who served Jim honestly for many years until his death from cholera. Jim started school for children of lower-paid railway staff. Life at Mokakeh Ghat was never dull, including playing football or hockey, visit from Nepalese royalty, large cobra in bathroom and celebrating Christmas.
This is another of Jim Corbett's books which keeps you interested to the end. We visited the last resting place of Jim Corbett in a cemetery, behind Baden Powell Museum, Nyeri, Kenya, in August 2014.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) Man-eater of Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 1944 (1989)
(2) The Man-eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, Jim Corbett, 1948 (1989)
(3) Jungle Lore, Jim Corbett, 1953 (2000)
(4) The Temple Tiger, Jim Corbett, 1954 (1991)
(5) Tree Tops, Jim Corbett, 1955 (1993)
(6) Jim Corbett's India, Hawkins, 1978
(7) Jim Corbett of Kumaon, DC Kala, 1979 (1999) 2009 (2014)
(8) Carpet Sahib, Martin Booth, 1986
(9) Under The Shadow of Man-eaters, Jerry Jaleel, 1997
(10)On Jim Corbett's Trail, Johnsingh, 2004
(11)My Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 2012
Having born in Kenya, I found this book interesting.


Practical Tracking: A to Following Footprints and Finding Animals
Practical Tracking: A to Following Footprints and Finding Animals
by Louis Liebenberg
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.34

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PRACTICAL TRACKING, 16 Dec 2014
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This book was first published in 2010, has 330 pages, 10 chapters, 129 colour photos and 11 B/W drawings. Tracking can be learnt with practice and patience. Tracking is identifying, following and interpreting wildlife tracks and signs. This book discusses tracks, trails, alertness and how these are practiced in the field. The concepts are all the same for different animals.
This book starts with identification of rare Canada lynx from its foot prints and DNA taken from its faeces. Individual animal spoor may vary according to its age, mass, sex. condition and the terrain. Smaller the animal, the more it becomes difficult to distinguish its spoor. Best foot prints (pug marks) are usually found in damp, slightly muddy earth, wet sand, a thin layer of loose dust or thin layer of fresh snow. The claws are protractile, since their normal position at rest is retracted within the sheaths, they are extended by ligaments when needed.
A gait describes the way the animal is moving. The speed of the track is evaluated from the position of the hind track to the front track. When the animal is going faster, the hind track is infront of the front track. (a) SLOW - stalking or hunting or scent marking (b) NORMAL - casual speed (c) FAST - chasing or being chased. Track patterns will show what the animal was doing. Absolute accuracy is not often possible with determining the age of the tracks. (1) OLD SPOOR - >24hrs (2) FRESH SPOOR - upto 12hrs (3) VERY FRESH SPOOR - about 3hrs. After memorising the spoor, it is best to walk next to it, not to spoil the trail. Tracking is easier in the morning and evening, as the shadows make the spoor easy to see.
Types of signs to look are spoor, scent, urine/faeces, saliva and blood. A jackal gives one howl when following a hyena, or many howls when following a leopard or lion. The landscape should be scanned constantly, both up ahead and either sides. Freeze and listen for few minutes when you approach a thicket, water, ridge, marsh, rocky out crop or reed bed. Direction of the wind will give any scent or noise of the tracker. Watch out for animal warning signs, alarm calls and smells. Don't make sudden movements which are easy to pick in good light. Slow movements are easy to pick in bad light. Retreat to a high ground (high ground is safe ground), as animals seldom come after you.
It is best to learn tracking with an experienced tracker on a trail. For safety, animal behaviour knowledge is essential. Animals are usually shot if they attack humans. It is best to avoid confrontation with wild animals and NEVER to test them, especially when they have their young.
The book ends with tracking different animals in the wilds of North America and South Africa, remembering their warning signs and dangers. The authors narrate some fascinating stories of the bush and their tracking experiences. They also warn about do's and don'ts in the presence of wildlife. For me, reading the stories of tracking of snakes, elephants, lions, leopards, hyena, rhino and buffalo, were very interesting.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) The Hunting and Spoor of Central African Game, DD Lyell, 1929
(2) Collins Guide to Animal Tracks and Signs, Bang, 1974
(3) Man Tracking, Robbins, 1977
(4) Art of Tracking, Liebenberg, 1990
(5) Behaviour Guide of African Mammals, Estes, 1992
(6) How to Read Animal Tracks and Signs, Rezendes, 1999
(7) Mammal Tracks and Signs, Elbroch, 2003
(8) Field Guide to the Tracks and Signs of Southern and East African Wildlife, Stuart, 2003
(9) A Game Ranger Remembers, Bryden, 2005
(10)Animal Tracking Basics, Young, 2007
Having born in Kenya, I enjoyed reading this book.


Jungle lore
Jungle lore
by Jim Corbett
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars JUNGLE LORE, 11 Dec 2014
This review is from: Jungle lore (Hardcover)
This book was first published in 1953 (2000), has 166 pages, 12 chapters, 6 B/W photos and 1 map. The book is dedicated to author's sister 'MAGGIE (Margaret Winifred Corbett). In this book Jim ( EDWARD JAMES CORBETT - 25.7.1875 to 19.4.1955) includes stories from days of his youth and his learning of jungle lore and his skill in removing man-eaters. He also opens readers eyes and ears to the sights and sounds of India and her wild places. His experience and skill in jungle craft helped him to interpret and imitate the sounds of beasts and birds, good enough to impress tiger's and leopard's acute senses.
Jim had heard of the 'churail' (evil spirited woman) only 3 times, always at night, and had seen it only once - looked like a dark brown eagle. As a young boy, he had learnt the feel of the jungle and use of rifle. Jim's brother TOM and his mother, helped Jim to recover from a bout of pneumonia. Jim learnt from his brother's dog, how to walk noiselessly through the jungle. After accidentally stepping on a large coiled python, Jim and his dog find themselves facing a large leopard. On holidays, between the 2 Great Wars, Jim spent his leave in the jungle of KALADHUNGI.
The leopard and tiger use their teeth to kill their victims. Tigers will also hamstring the animals by using their claws. Between Jim's estate and the jungle, Jim shot his 1st tiger after the 2nd World War. This tiger had killed a horse, a calf and 2 bullocks. Jim could identify each creature by the tracks it made. All jungle animals understand each other's language. The tiger cub pug marks are larger than that of a large leopard. Jim had also learnt the tracks of snakes. The sound of birds or animals only heard once, a warning call of immediate danger, calls for instant action.
At the age of 10, Jim had joined the cadets of NAINI TAL volunteer rifles. Fear had taught Jim to move noiselessly, to climb trees, to pinpoint sound and to use his eyes and rifle. Later, Jim kills his 1st leopard. Another leopard was shot after Jim had set fire to the tall grass. Forest fires always frightened Jim. He hunts in the jungle with his dog 'ROBIN' and the dogs belonging to the Maharajah of JIND. Jim also participated in 4 tiger hunts when the Viceroy of India made his 1st visit to Jim's village of Kaladhungi. The leopard has no difficulty in catching langur monkeys.
But the leopard does not trust his weight when following red monkeys into thin branches of the tree. Jim used juice from 'Brahm Buti' (God's flower) to heal flesh wounds. With so many birds and animals in the jungle and walking on his own at night, Jim had developed a subconscious sense and impulse to avoid a known and anticipated danger.
This is another of Jim's books that keeps you interested to the end.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) Man-eater of Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 1944 (1989)
(2) The Man-eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, Jim Corbett, 1948 (1989)
(3) My India, Jim Corbett, 1952 (1989)
(4) The Temple Tiger, Jim Corbett, 1954 (1991)
(5) Tree Tops, Jim Corbett, 1955 (1992)
(6) Jim Corbett's India, Hawkins, 1978
(7) Jim Corbett of Kumaon, DC Kala, 1979 (1999) 2009 (2014)
(8) Carpet Sahib, Martin Booth, 1986
(9) Under The Shadow of Man-eaters, Jerry Jaleel, 1997
(10)On Jim Corbett's Trail, Johnsingh, 2004
(11)My Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 2012
Having born in Kenya, I found this book interesting.


Into Africa: Story of the East African Safari (Travel Literature)
Into Africa: Story of the East African Safari (Travel Literature)
by Kenneth M. Cameron
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars INTO AFRICA, 7 Dec 2014
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This book was first published in 1990, has 196 pages, 12 chapters, 55 B/W photos and 1 map of East Africa. The book is dedicated to 'Patti'. This book covers the history of safari from its origin of trade to the safari's golden age of 1920s and 1930s. KENNETH CAMERON uses first hand accounts and his own personal experience of East Africa, to give the reader the sense of 'being there'. The book covers the historical detail of the safari, the clothes, the equipment, relationship between whites and blacks, stunt safaris, hunting safaris and the myth of the great white hunter, and the adventure of a safari.
The book starts with very early days of safari lead by Arabs and then a few Europeans, into the interior of Africa, from Zanzibar, some taking 2 years or more ! The long snake of the safari had many problems and delays. Water was very important and there was a lot of waste created on popular routes. Before boiling of water was realised, diseases were rife. Nearly all Europeans resolved to flogging Africans. The caravans then returned to the coast. The arrival of 'Uganda Railways' in 1901, changed all that and opened the Safariland, which was dominated by Volcanoes and Savannahs. Then, there is the Great Rift Valley with its lakes and Volcanoes. Early safaris wanted to see the 'paradise of big game'. The Railway produced the Safariland capital called 'NYROBE' (Nairobi).
In 1902, the 1st stop in Nairobi as a tin hut and the 1st hotel in a shanty called 'Woods Hotel'. Safari organisers sprang up, both Indian and European. In 1907, the term 'White Hunter' was coined. President Roosevelt's (Bwana Tumbo) 1909 BEA (British East Africa) safari, increased the appeal of it. Clients went to bed at 8pm and rose at 4am. For Africans, safaris were hard work for 3 pence a day and they often got charged by rhinos. By 1912, Ford Car was replacing the porters and the 1st World War devastated the safari business. In 1891, Doctor May (Mary) French Sheldon took her own East African safari and was called a 'crazy woman'. Safari wives were common before the Europeans came.
By 1928, safari expanded into Tanganyika (Tanzania). Cars and cruise ships increased this. But Nairobi was still ahead of Arusha as a centre, and is still so. The rich had their 'Champagne Safaris'. Photography safari followed. After 2nd World War, the safaris started again, but with much reduced wildlife. Instead of coming by sea, most tourists now came by jets to Nairobi. After independence, the walking safaris vanished and were replaced by safaris in 4x4 vehicles or mini buses. Many lodges were built to accommodate thousands of new tourists. In 1977, Kenya banned hunting. National Parks and Reserves were formed as protected areas for the wildlife. The safari tourists had to stay in the car in these areas, apart from picnic or toilet areas. Many camping areas were opened.
Today, the safari is popular as ever. As long as the animals remain, safari will too. We have enjoyed our share of being 'on safari' since 2001, mainly in East Africa. Our last was in August/September 2014 through Kenya/Tanzania. Yes, it is much busier now-a-days, but you can still find a quiet spot and view and listen to nature.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) Through Masai Land, Joseph Thomson, 1885
(2) My African Journey, Churchill, 1908
(3) Through Central Africa East to West, Kearton, 1915
(4) A Game Ranger on Safari, AB Percival, 1928
(5) Out of Africa, Karen Blixen, 1937
(6) The Nylon safari, Rehna Cloete, 1956
(7) On safari, Armand Denis, 1963
(8) End of the Game, Peter Beard, 1965
(9) The Iron Snake, Ronald Hardy, 1965
(10)Safari, Bartle Bull, 1988
Having born in Kenya, I found this book interesting.


The Lion Hunter: In the Days When All South Africa Was Virgin Hunting Field (Classic Reprint)
The Lion Hunter: In the Days When All South Africa Was Virgin Hunting Field (Classic Reprint)
by Roualeyn Gordon-Cumming
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.01

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars THE LION HUNTER, 2 Dec 2014
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This book was first published in 1850 (1915) 2012, has 378 pages and 13 chapters. The wildlife in South Africa and all over Africa was at one time teaming. Many hunters went their and slaughtered it. In this book, the editor has selected best parts from 2 volumes. One must remember that hunting was excepted in the 1800s as normal, which today rightly is very distasteful. Rifles were also poor those days and many shots were needed to bring the animal down. Suffering to wildlife was not considered either at that time. Hunters also took a lot of risks, not knowing the country and the dangers of wildlife hunting.
RONALEYN GEORGE GORDON-CUMMING was born on 15.3.1820 in Scotland. He went to Eton to study and even as a student, his room was filled with wildlife trophies and objects of natural history. He collected bird eggs. He loved salmon fishing and deer stalking and to be alone in the forests. In 1838, he was in India and hunted tigers, buffalo and elephants. In 1840, he returned to Scotland. In 1843, he went to South Africa. He wanted to travel north into the wilds and took a large Cape wagon and few Africans. He witnessed the springbok migration and first time heard the lion roar at RIET river. He wore kilts and at times he went almost naked. He returned with his trophies to LONDON in 1851 and exhibited them in a museum. He went about the country for many years exhibiting and lecturing. By 1858, he had premonition of impending death, so he ordered a coffin and made his will. He died on 24.3.1866 at Fort AUGUSTUS, Scotland.
The book starts on 23.2.1844, when Cumming meets many Boer families at RIET river, South Africa. He started collecting Blesbok and black wildebeest trophies for his collection. One night, he slept with a puff adder under his pillow ! During his time in South Africa, there were many 'quaggas' about. Trying for a lioness trophy, he was charged by this lioness, who then lacerates Cumming's horse. She was eventually shot. He returned to COLESBERG to store his trophies and get some supplies and more men. Up North, he meets Dr David Livingstone. Travelling with his men, Cumming continued to shoot at eland, buffalo, rhino, elephant, giraffe and hippo. After hunting in the bush for 11 months, his appearance became wild and even the Boers could not recognise him.
After staying and taking supplies in GRAHAMSTOWN, Cumming head back into the wild interior again. He continued to get fever attacks. By 1849, he was returning back and meets William Cotton Oswell, also a big game hunter. Then finishing his expedition and tired, Cumming marched to PORT ELIZABETH. On 7.6.1849, he sailed on 'Augusta' to England with his trophies, after 5 years in the wilds of South Africa.
This book is full of repetitive shooting of wildlife, nearly everyday, as was common in those olden days.


The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag
The Man-Eating Leopard of Rudraprayag
by Jim Corbett
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE MAN-EATING LEOPARD OF RUDRAPRAYAG, 30 Nov 2014
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This book was first published in 1948 (1989), has 166 pages, 24 chapters, 7 B/W photos and beautiful endpaper maps. The book is dedicated to victims of the man-eating leopard of Rudraprayag. Over 8 years, this leopard had killed nearly 125 people. It took Jim ( EDWARD JAMES CORBETT - 25.7.1875 to 19.4.1955 ) 2 years and 10 weeks on a stretch to kill this leopard.
The 1st human killed by the leopard of Rudraprayag was on 9.6.1918 and after 8 years, the last human killed was on 14.4.1926. Estimates of deaths were over 125. This lead to 'terror' and total curfew imposed by the man-eater. In 1925, Jim was asked for help and in 10 days he and his men arrived in Rudraprayag. The leopard was thought to be an old strong male. When a 'sadhu' is taken, a beat is organised, but it failed as the man-eater had left the area. Jim thought the man-eater was using the 2 bridges to cross from one area to the next. The leopard had also followed Jim. Then a pregnant woman is taken. Jim closed the bridges using thorn bushes.
A leopard was trapped in a gin-trap and later shot, but Jim felt it was not the man-eater. Next, the man-eater had crossed the bridge and taken a woman. When Jim and Ibbotson returned in the evening after sitting in a tree, they were followed by the leopard. Exhausted from looking for the leopard, Jim returned to NAINI TAL. After 3 months, Jim returned to Rudraprayag, to find 10 humans had been killed by the man-eater, in his absence. When a man is killed, his body was poisoned with cyanide capsules. But the man-eater survived the poisoning and killed another 70 year old woman. He even escaped the gin-trap set for him.
Then one boy is killed and another boy was carried off by the leopard. That night, Jim hears the man-eater having a fight with another male leopard. The man-eater travelled towards the pilgrim shelter, on the road to Rudraprayag. On this road Jim sat in a 'machan' (platform) in a mango tree for 10 days, over a goat. On the 11th dark night, the dogs started barking and at 10 pm, using a torch, Jim shot the leopard, as it approached the goat. The leopard was 7' 6", old with worn teeth and one canine broken. He had multiple cut wounds on his body. The leopard was laid under a tree for the people to see. Every year a 'mela' (festival) was held at Rudraprayag to commemorate the death of the man-eater. See article in BBC Wildlife Magazine December 2014, on Leopards and Indians living side by side with only small number of human fatalities. leopards in Indian towns relying on stray dogs, cats and pigs. Killing leopards has been outlawed in India.
Like Jim's other books, his observations and experience keep you interested in this book right to the end. In August 2014, me and my wife visited the last resting place of Jim Corbett, at NYERI, Kenya, in the cemetery behind the Baden Powell Museum.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) Man-eater of Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 1944 (1989)
(2) My India, Jim Corbett, 1952 (1989)
(3) Jungle Lore, Jim Corbett, 1953 (2000)
(4) Temple Tiger, Jim Corbett, 1954 (1991)
(5) Tree Tops, Jim Corbett, 1955 (1992)
(6) Jim Corbett's India, Hawkins, 1978
(7) Jim Corbett of Kumaon, DC Kala, 1979 (1999) 2009 (2014)
(8) Under the Shadow of Man-eaters, Jerry Jaleel, 1997
(9) Carpet Sahib, Martin Booth, 1986
(10)My Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 2012
Having born in Kenya, I enjoyed reading this book.


The Temple Tiger and More Man-Eaters of Kumaon
The Temple Tiger and More Man-Eaters of Kumaon
by Jim Corbett
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE TEMPLE TIGER and More Man-eaters of Kumaon, 26 Nov 2014
This book was first published in 1954 (1991), has 197 pages, 6 chapters, 10 B/W photos and no maps.
While visiting DABIDHURA and its rest house on 'God's Mountain', Jim (EDWARD JAMES CORBETT 25.7.1875 to 19.4.1955) was asking about the leopard who tried to drag a herdsman away. However, the priest told Jim, if he wanted to kill anything, he should try the 'Temple Tiger'. Jim was carrying his brand new rifle. When the tiger killed 2 cows, Jim followed it. He shoots the tiger twice but misses. Next time, while Jim was in a tree, the tiger was watching him. As the tiger kills his 5th cow, Jim sits in the tree near the carcass. The tiger came and watched Jim again, pawed the tree in which Jim was sitting and purred at him. Then the tiger vanished. He was a large male tiger.
In 1910, at MUKTESAR, a tigress could not eat after she got stuck with quills from a porcupine. She killed 3 people and became a man-eater. After she killed 24 humans, the Government asked Jim for help. When Jim eventually shoots her, he finds that she was blind in one eye and had 50 quills in her right forearm. In 1907, the PANAR man-eater leopard had killed nearly 400 humans. In 1910, Jim was asked for help. After tying a goat, Jim sat in a tree and shot the leopard, giving Jim an attack of fever.
In 1936, a man-eating tiger at CHUKA tried to take a man driving his 2 bullocks. In June 1937, the tiger killed 2 boys and 2 cows. Then another boy is taken by the tiger. From the pug marks (foot prints), Jim could tell that it was a big male tiger. Jim takes a shot at him, but misses. The tiger had killed buffalo and carried them away (see page 150 in 'Tiger Fire' by Valmik Thapar). When eventually Jim shot him twice, the tiger was in a good condition, 9' 6" and his right canine of the lower jaw was missing.
Over 8 years, the TALLA DES man-eater tiger had killed 150 people. In April 1929, Jim is asked to deal with this man-eater. He was told that an old woman had been killed by the tiger in March. Jim comes across 2 tigers asleep in a field and he shoots them. Suddenly, a 3rd tiger runs and Jim shoots it too, but only wounded it and it limped into the bushes. The 2 tigers shot were grown up cubs and it was their mother, probably the man-eater, which had limped away. Jim tries to find her and get in touch with her. So he follows her. 5 days later, Jim had shot her again, but she rushed away. Following her again, he shot her twice, when she tried to charge him. She had many porcupine quills in her making her a man-eater.
Jim's experience and observations make this book an enjoyable book to read to the end. In August 2014 me and my wife visited the last resting place of Jim Corbett in NYERI, Kenya, in the cemetery just behind the Baden Powell Museum.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) Man-eaters of Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 1944 (1989)
(2) The Man-eating Leopard of Rudraprayag, Jim Corbett, 1951 (1989)
(3) My India, Jim Corbett, 1952 (1989)
(4) Jungle Lore, Jim Corbett, 1953 (2000)
(5) Tree Tops, Jim Corbett, 1955 (1992)
(6) Jim Corbett's India, Hawkins, 1978
(7) Jim Corbett of Kumaon, DC Kala, 1979 (1999) 2009 (2014)
(8) Carpet Sahib, Martin Booth, 1986
(9) Under the Shadow of Man-eaters, Jerry Jaleel, 1997
(10)My Kumaon, Jim Corbett, 2012
Having born in Kenya, I enjoyed reading this book.


Service and Sport on the Tropical Nile. Some Records of the Duties and Diversions of an Officer Among Natives and Big Game During the Re-Occupation of the Nilotic Province
Service and Sport on the Tropical Nile. Some Records of the Duties and Diversions of an Officer Among Natives and Big Game During the Re-Occupation of the Nilotic Province
by Captain C A Sykes
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars SERVICE AND SPORT ON THE TROPICAL NILE, 24 Nov 2014
This book was first published in 1903 (2013), has 298 pages, 18 chapters, 17 B/W photos and 1 map. The book is dedicated to author's mother. In 1877, Captain CLEMENT A SYKES was asked by foreign office to go to Uganda for 2 years, to put down the mutiny by the Sudanese troops. He travels to Zanzibar, MOMBASA and then on Uganda Railways for 100 miles. After that, they had to march internally in a terrific heat. From KIBWEZI, they could see Mt Kilimanjaro towards the south. The wildlife around the road was in their thousands. After passing the MAU escarpment (8,000ft), they descended to Mumias (4,000ft) and Lake Victoria. They sailed to Entebbe and then moved onto Kampala.
The loyal Indian and Sudanese soldiers were saving Uganda. The currency was in cowrie shells. The silver 1 Rupee and 1/2 Rupee coins came in later. King Mwanga was deposed and his mutineers arrested and tried. Many Africans were gobbled up by crocodiles and hurried out of Africa in this manner! Here Sykes starts to learn Arabic. He also suffered from what he called 'Malarial leg ulcers'. From Kampala, Sykes goes for a patrol towards the Ruwenzori area and then back to Kampala. From Entebbe, he takes an expedition down the Nile and takes 250 Sudanese soldiers. They pass the Murchinson's and Uhuru Falls. Sykes and his men get the fever.
Some of the officers suffered from 'Blackwater Fever', dysentery, malaria and dislocated shoulder, before arriving at WADELAI. The journey continued with a flotilla down the Nile, watching the beautiful white eared Kob. They approach the SUDD, which is mostly soft to tread and swampy with papyrus growing thickly upon it. Sykes had malarial fever nearly every day and worse at 'Mosquito Camp'. 2 Officers had died of Blackwater Fever. They meet many Chiefs and hunt antelope and kill poisonous snakes. After Sykes shoots an elephant, the Africans soon clean the carcass. Moving the loads, they come across 50 elephants. Sykes shoots and the elephants charge and he and his gun-bearers barely escape with their lives.
Sykes starts collecting butterflies and beetles. He kept monkey and antelope as pets. When a local Sudanese woman is killed, Sykes follows the mutineers with his Sudanese and Swahili troops. After clearing them, he and his men return. Just as Sykes is about to hear his home leave was due after 20 months in Uganda, his leave was cancelled and the foreign office asked him to stay for another 8 months. He hunts a female rhino, and after shooting her dead, her cub is eaten by the Africans. He flogged the Africans if they made themselves ill.
After Sykes replacement had come, he took leave with some tears in his eyes and a lump in his throat. Leaving Uganda, he came to the nearly completed Uganda Railways, but was glad to walk as the rails were very unstable. He arrived back in MOMBASA and then sailed home.
This is an interesting book of early Uganda Protectorate and the life at that time in East Africa. The artist who drew Mt Kilimanjaro and Murchinson's Falls, had obviously never been to Africa or misread the pictures which were brought back, as his drawings look nothing like the real scenes.
Some other books of interest are:-
(1) British Mission to Uganda in 1893, Sir Portal, 1894 (1970) 2010
(2) Soldiering and Surveying in British East Africa, MacDonald, 1897 (1973)
(3) With MacDonald in Uganda, Austin, 1903 (1969)
(4) Early Days in East Africa, Sir Jackson, 1930 (1969)
(5) The Rise of Our East African Empire, 2 Volumes, Lord Lugard, 1893 (1968)
(6) Eight Years in Uganda and East Africa, Rev Tucker, 1908 (2011)
(7) British East Africa or IBEA, MacDermott, 1893 (2010)
(8) My Mission to Abyssinia, Gerald Portal, 1892 (1969) 2010
(9) John Ainsworth and Making of Kenya, Maxon, 1980
(10)New Light on Dark Africa, Karl Peters, 1891 (2010)
Having born in Kenya, I found this book interesting.


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