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ZedBooks "Zeddy" (London)

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Expert Shield - THE Crystal Clear Screen Protector for: Panasonic Lumix *Lifetime Guarantee* (Panasonic Lumix TZ10-TZ30 Crystal Clear Expert Shield)
Expert Shield - THE Crystal Clear Screen Protector for: Panasonic Lumix *Lifetime Guarantee* (Panasonic Lumix TZ10-TZ30 Crystal Clear Expert Shield)
Offered by Expert Shield
Price: £7.95

4.0 out of 5 stars It does what it says on the tin!, 11 Dec. 2013
I have attached a number of protective screens to smartphones and camera screens in the past, but this is the first time I have managed to attach a protective film to a camera without a single bubble and without a single speck of dust to spoil the effect. And as far as I can tell so far, the Expert Shield does not diminish the sensitivity of the screen in any measurable way. It remains to be seen how it fares over the next year or two but, so far, I say: Bravo.


The Gladiators (Vintage Classics)
The Gladiators (Vintage Classics)
Price: £4.35

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A REMARKABLE FEAT OF HISTORICAL EXTRAPOLATION, 19 Nov. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the first of Koestler's trilogy about failed revolutions, and despite the almost total absence of facts about the gladiators' revolt in the 1st century BC, he created a compelling myth about Spartacus and his desire to set up a utopian state for his ragged army of gladiators, slaves, dispossessed farmers and hangers on. At first the slave army defeats a number of complacent Roman generals and poorly trained Legions -- but of course the revolution is doomed to fail, and ironically at the hands of Crassus, the immensely wealthy Roman, perhaps the world's first monetary oligarch, whose God is capitalism. An extraordinary novel which has inspired people for 60 years, and almost as good as the superlative Darkness at Noon, the second novel of the trilogy. Both are required reading!


A Wanted Man (Jack Reacher, Book 17)
A Wanted Man (Jack Reacher, Book 17)
Price: £5.31

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A lesson in shallowness, 29 Mar. 2013
Reacher is completely unbelievable as a character. And the plots are contrived and asinine in the extreme. Thisis the literary equivalent of high-fat fast food -- full of calories but low on real substance.


Unlikely Killer
Unlikely Killer
Price: £1.92

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Really poor writing!, 3 Aug. 2011
This review is from: Unlikely Killer (Kindle Edition)
Sorry, but I really thought this was a terribly written book. Perhaps it was due to the Kindle process, but the text is full of errors. But it can't all be Kindle errors - there are made-up words, endless examples of terrible grammar, hundreds of cliches, and holes in the plot big enough for an elephant to fall through. It is also massively over-written, appallingly, almost lovingly bloodthirsty, and gauche to the point of embarrassment when dealing with relationships. As for the plot, it gallops forward in the most asinine way, and you know that when an author resorts to the cheap trick putting the detective's family in the firing line that they have simply run out of ideas and are taking the easy way out. As for the surprise ending... I had worked it out about halfway through the book. This author needs to find a really tough editor. There is something here, but it is buried under rubbish.


Playing The Game
Playing The Game
Price: £0.99

2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ZedBooks Man, 1 May 2011
This review is from: Playing The Game (Kindle Edition)
There is a decent yarn in here, but this is one of the worst written books I have read for a long time! It's full of appalling cliches, grammatical errors, spelling mistakes and sheer ineptitude.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 2, 2011 12:19 AM BST


The Brutal Art
The Brutal Art
by Jesse Kellerman
Edition: Hardcover

33 of 42 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars ANOTHER KELLERMAN ON THE SCENE, 28 July 2008
This review is from: The Brutal Art (Hardcover)
Faye and Jonathan Kellerman are both bestselling thriller writers, but it seems that their greatest contribution to the genre could well be their son, Jesse, whose latest psychological drama is as startlingly original as his first two. This author, already an award-winning playwright, has no need of blood, bullets, guts and gore to build tension; he knows exactly which buttons to push to keep readers anxiously engaged - even when the plot apparently involves nothing more sinister than a New York art gallery owner, Ethan Muller, who discovers a cache of brilliant but disturbing drawings by a mysterious artist who has since disappeared. Ethan puts the pictures on show, and they start to sell for large sums. But then it begins to emerge that the artist could have been involved in a series of brutal child murders 40 years before, and the drawings might even be evidence. Kellerman writes with grace and style, and shows very nimble creative footwork when long buried secrets about Ethan's own family begin inexorably to break into the fictions so carefully constructed by people who want the past to remain somewhere else.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 17, 2009 4:56 PM GMT


The Brutal Art
The Brutal Art
by Jesse Kellerman
Edition: Paperback

4 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another Kellerman takes over, 28 July 2008
This review is from: The Brutal Art (Paperback)
Faye and Jonathan Kellerman are both bestselling thriller writers, but it seems that their greatest contribution to the genre could well be their son, Jesse, whose latest psychological drama is as startlingly original as his first two. This author, already an award-winning playwright, has no need of blood, bullets, guts and gore to build tension; he knows exactly which buttons to push to keep readers anxiously engaged - even when the plot apparently involves nothing more sinister than a New York art gallery owner, Ethan Muller, who discovers a cache of brilliant but disturbing drawings by a mysterious artist who has since disappeared. Ethan puts the pictures on show, and they start to sell for large sums. But then it begins to emerge that the artist could have been involved in a series of brutal child murders 40 years before, and the drawings might even be evidence. Kellerman writes with grace and style, and shows very nimble creative footwork when long buried secrets about Ethan's own family begin inexorably to break into the fictions so carefully constructed by people who want the past to remain somewhere else.


The Bloomsday Dead
The Bloomsday Dead
by Adrian McKinty
Edition: Paperback

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fasten your seatbelts!, 28 July 2008
This review is from: The Bloomsday Dead (Paperback)
The Bloomsday Dead, by Adrian McKinty
Serpent's Tail, £10.99
Those who know McKinty will automatically tighten their seat belts. To newcomers I say: buckle up and get set for a bumpy ride through a very harsh landscape indeed. His character, Michael Forsythe, is the real McCoy hard man - as wary, cunning and ruthless as a sewer rat. He has escaped from a Mexican prison, losing a foot in the process, killed a top New York gangster, and he has consequently been on the run from assassins for 12 years. The question in this thriller is: can he survive until midnight on the 100th Bloomsday in Ireland and also find the kidnapped daughter of his former nemesis, Bridget Callaghan? It is Bridget who has been trying to kill him for the last dozen years, but now that her daughter has been nabbed, she sends for Forsythe as the man most able to penetrate the fissiparous political and criminal gangs operating in Belfast. His journey in some ways parallels that of James Joyce's Leopold Bloom on one day in Dublin but, trust me on this, it is a lot more violent and a very great deal more exciting.


Dearly Devoted Dexter
Dearly Devoted Dexter
by Jeff Lindsay
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.74

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dexter is distinctly different!, 15 April 2008
This review is from: Dearly Devoted Dexter (Paperback)
Dexter Morgan knows exactly why monstrous serial killers do what they do - because Dexter is himself a serial killer, even if he confines his chopping up of bodies to child killers and other unpleasant murderers who have somehow escaped justice. He tells us cheerfully that he likes nothing more than a long night with his very sharp knives and a helpless, bound victim. And he works for the Miami homicide police as a blood spatter analyst (he ought to know). Every instinct told me to disapprove of this book and to condemn its flippancy about depravity but, dammit, Dexter has a way of er. . . getting under your skin, and making you like him. His one-liners are exquisitely funny (in a very dark way) and the plots are excellent - to the extent that I rushed out to buy the first Dexter book before writing this review. In this second outing, Dexter is forced to team up with his nemesis, the forbidding Sergeant Doakes, to track down a hideous monster who spends weeks torturing his victims. Dexter is the most original sleuth to have appeared for years, and sharp as a razor. . .


The Big Over Easy: Nursery Crime Adventures 1
The Big Over Easy: Nursery Crime Adventures 1
by Jasper Fforde
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent hokum, 15 April 2008
The unfortunate Detective Inspector Jack Spratt, head of the Reading Police Department's Nursery Crime Division is in bad odour, not merely because he has failed to get any of his cases dramatised on television or even published in Amazing Crime Stories, but also because his recent prosecutions failed. His attempt to get the Three Pigs convicted on the grounds that boiling Mr Wolff alive had been premeditated and beyond the reasonable force required to protect themselves, was thrown out by a jury (the youngest pig had refused to squeal on the others). "Those pigs should have fried," Jack mutters. Then there was the farmer's wife who beat a cruelty charge for cutting mice tails off with a carving knife. But everything changes when, accompanied by a new sidekick, Sergeant Mary Mary[correct], he takes on the case of the death of a certain egghead called Humpty Dumpty who seems to have died from injuries sustained from a fall from a nearby wall. Before long Jack and Mary are deeply embroiled in high society skulduggery. The amazing thing is that Jasper Forde manages to sustain this highly enjoyable hokum for 400 pages without going off the boil. Very funny.


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