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Mr. R. Aherne "raymond_the_great" (Wet and windy Britain)
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Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human
by Harold Bloom
Edition: Paperback

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Intuitive yet pretencious, 29 Aug 2006
This book is perfect for the study of any shakespeare play, with facsinating observations and wonderful wit from one of the best scholars on this topic. However, the pretencious opinion of Bloom can be a bit overwhelming, and at best rather irritating. His constant praise of Sir. John Falstaff, and obsession with Hamlet, using both on nearly every page decrease the critical value of this work. While it is excellent in content, it is simply a work of reverence to Fallstaff and due to this falls short of making this 4 star book even better. Bloom's excentric obsessions prove more of a deterrent than anything else.


Ulysses (Oxford World's Classics)
Ulysses (Oxford World's Classics)
by James Joyce
Edition: Paperback

9 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars hard going and rather confusing, 26 May 2006
Confusing, is my first impression. It must be noted that before a reading of 'Ulysses', Joyce's previous book, 'portrait of an artist', MUST be read, otherwise, like me, you will find this book convoluted, irritating and completely annoying. I found this, and continue to feel this way, nevertheless it is a book that, for literary lovers, is an excellent example of Joyce's revolutionary writing style and imaginative narratives. Although this book is long, drawn out and overall rather irritating [in my opinion], it was interesting, in its style and genre. A book that, if time allows, should be read by those who love great Literature, and have far too much patience.


Time's Arrow
Time's Arrow
by Martin Amis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars not for the faint of heart, 6 April 2006
This review is from: Time's Arrow (Paperback)
By far Amis's best, but most controversial novel, one that will leave you stunned, but yearning for more from start to finish. it is short enough to read in one sitting, but long enough to keep you guessing and make you understand the massive twist which takes place. Something that anyone and everyone should read at least 10 times. Amis at his best.


Money: A Suicide Note
Money: A Suicide Note
by Martin Amis
Edition: Paperback
Price: 6.29

8 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 6 April 2006
This review is from: Money: A Suicide Note (Paperback)
I loved this book; it sees the attempts, both successful and failures of John Self, an intriging character who takes the reader through a journey of money, sex, alcohol, George Orwell [one of the best authors of this epoch!] and pornography in a way that both repels and amuses. Amis is a writer who is himself in love with the disgusting attitude portrayed here- adding himself in this nove that displays his talent for writing with unrivaled glory. A must read!


The Plays of Oscar Wilde (Wordsworth Classics)
The Plays of Oscar Wilde (Wordsworth Classics)
by Oscar Wilde
Edition: Paperback
Price: 1.89

5 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A comedian for all our times, 6 April 2006
best known for his work 'a picture of Dorian Grey' - which I also urge anyone to read, his most famous play is 'The Importance of being Ernest'. Whether you have seen the film or not, it is far more funny in the book version. Wilde manipulates his comic talents so well in this play, making every other utterance one of amusement. His other works, such as 'A woman of no importance' are equally wonderful.


War and Peace (Wordsworth Classics)
War and Peace (Wordsworth Classics)
by Leo Tolstoy
Edition: Paperback
Price: 1.99

11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Literature at its best, 6 April 2006
This book is unsupassable in many aspects, but flawed in others. It could be argued that the length is slightly distressing, and also the theory of history that is interlaced inbetween the narrative can be frustrating. Tolstoy makes for a very good historian, but fails to understand that to tell the reader what happens in theory before he actually describes it is a little odd and irritating, but the wonder of this book means that al is worthwhile. As an enjoyable read it may be flawed, but as a masterpiece that has become a work to live on forever, it lives up to its reputation. I definately urge anyone to read this.


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